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I cheated and read the threads before I posted this.
If you are in base housing, check with the housing office and see what they will allow. Drive around and see what others have done in your area. If your base has a "Self Help Store" (again ask at housing or other people that have been there a while), grass seed, bedding plants, perrenial plants, supplies, equipment, etc may be available at no charge for people in base quarters. The plants limited quantities for your spring planting needs, tools and equipment on an "as available basis".
Many areas have county extension offices that can answer agricultural questions for your area regarding best suited plants, plant pests and diseases and treatments. Check the government pages in your telephone directory for listings. Usually if you are directed to the right office, they are very helpful. The same with ag departments at some of the local colleges and universities, one poster specified "Land Grant" colleges.
If your yard was sodded, even sloppily, after it starts growing, the sod will fill in the bare spots. Many types of grass further south are not sodded in a solid carpet, but plugged at intervals that grow and spread to the bare spots.
As suggested by other posters, rake and remove the largest rocks, also remove construction debris. A dead patch in the yard later could indicate the presence of nails or shingles. In that case you can pin point the offending material and remove it.
Hopefully, you will have a few years at your new assignment to do and enjoy your yard before transferred.
Best wishes, Nancy G. USA (retired)

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In article snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net says...

If I were you I'd try and minimize lawn as much as possible by planting wildflowers. Wildflower seed can be gotten by the pound online for less than $35 which should be enough to cover your land unless you have a huge site. Plan out a mixture of lawn and wildflowers such that the grass has easy turns for your lawn mower and use the lawn as walk ways through your garden. In your wildflower sections, follow the instructions for spring planting, plant the seeds on the fresh soil (you're not suppose to till it much), then plant grass seeds in the grass areas, and let everything grow. The nice thing about having grass walkways to contain the wildflowers is that it will look like a planned garden so you'll get less complaints from neighbors thinking you're just growing a bunch of weeds. Make sure you have grass pathways by the property lines with your neighbors too.
If you're into herbs, perennials, annuals, bushes, etc., set aside land for that as well. You might want to start small and find out what you like and what grows well in your location. Gardens take years to grow and as the years go by and you get a feel for the light and location, you can make changes to suit your vision. The nice thing about wildflowers is that they're pretty resilient and they can look magnificent the first year and, unlike annuals, you don't have to plant each flower individually. Just spread the seeds, water, weed a little, and hope for rain in Spring.
And don't forget trees. All gardens should have trees. If you plan to live there awhile, trees take a long time to grow if you plant them from seedlings and you may as well get a couple started ASAP.
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