Home Depot politics

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Thank you for this information. All the more reason for me to support Home Depot. Matt in MI

a
Republicans
want
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Thanks for that bit, Z. Here in Maine we are about to experience Lowes in competition with HD. 2 Lowes stores, one in Brunswick and one in Auburn.
The Auburn Store will be in quadrangle with HD, Super Wal-Mart, and BJ's Wholesale Club. Another Big Box property on the same "strip" is yet to be disclosed, was the former Wal-mart.
Simply put, I'm looking for the best deal on an Echo 210 Staight Shaft Trimmer and the brush blade that goes with. HD has the lowest price in Maine at the moment and I'm holding out at this point for end of season sales.
If I were purely politically oriented, I'd not buy from HD. But when MY budget is tested on a product or a project, I'll shop for best price ( period).
choice is wonderful.
sue western Maine
far away from anywhere.
-- Breeze ( sue burnham)
| Maybe this is much too off topic, but a friend of mine who is much more of a | political animal than I am told me HD is heavily supported by rich Republicans | such as Arthur Blank, the | president of Home Depot, who hosted a dinner | in Atlanta that gave Bush $2.5 million. So any of you whose whole lives, | including gardening, are permeated with their political convictions might want | to go to Loew's, etc. if you need to buy at a big chain store. | zemedelec
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in
be
Be sure you are comparing apples to apples. Sometimes HD has products produced to cheaper specifications that are sold only in its stores. The Echo trimmer that you want may or may NOT be exactly the same at Lowe's, Wal-Mart, and Home Depot.
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Almost anything sold by any of these crap-o-mats can be found to have a parallel product vastly better from Seers. I'm no huge fan of Seers, but I'm far less a fan of products that break easily or don't even work, which is what you get at (in order of crappiness) Home Depot & its ilk. And all too often, the illusion of having saved a dollar by paying $10 at Home Depot for what costs $11 at Seers, since the Lowes product breaks right away it's actually $10 too much, & since the Seers version lasts for years & years, it's the real bargain.
I've also gotten superior products at Ace Hardware & Fred Meyers, in some cases after having to return unutterable junky versions to Home Depot or Lowes. I have hardly ever set foot in WalMart, but the couple times I ever got anything there (a garden light comes to mind) it was broken in a trice, so WalMart slipped off my map entirely. I do still compare-shop at Home Depot & Lowes, but anything that has two or more moving parts to it is guaranteed not to work as well (if at all) as the equivalent from Seers. It's just the way it always works out.
-paghat the ratgirl
--
"Of what are you afraid, my child?" inquired the kindly teacher.
"Oh, sir! The flowers, they are wild," replied the timid creature.
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"Vox Humana"

I would add to that you will never get a ration of crap trying to return something to Sears. I bought a fairly expensive expensive self propelled mower a while back and I just didn't like the way it operated.
After using it twice I took it back to the store. The guy asked me why I was returning it and I told him exactly why. They gave me a full refund without batting an eye.
Tyler
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"Vox Humana"

which
all
years
mower a

was
without
Apparently the new CEO of HD is quite proud of the new return policy. Of course, he blamed, I mean credited it to some low level employee who said it wasn't fair to take stuff back and give people cash while she could hardly pay her bills. The logic escaped me and Wolf Blitzer didn't seem to be troubled by the nonsense.
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I'm afraid I don't exactly follow that logic either. So what is their new return policy?
Tyler
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Of
said it

hardly
return
I'm not entirely sure. Blitzer mentioned that people always remarked that "Home Depot will take anything back." That lead to the discussion about how it wasn't fair to take things back and they were cracking down on people who were abusive. Frankly, there are times that I don't know if I will need ten pipe fittings or 18. I might need six of these and seven of those and perhaps four of another. I don't want to run out of supplies and have to drive to the hardware store in the middle of a project. I tend to buy more than I need and return the rest. I haven't had a problem so far at Lowe's or HD, but if there is some new stringent return policy at HD, that is yet another reason to shop elsewhere. There have been time that I have had to return things to HD because there were parts missing from the box. Once I got a toilet and the take and bowl didn't match because someone switched them in the box. Once I got a bunch of plumbing components recommended by an employee that were the wrong parts and I had to return them.
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On Wed, 28 Jul 2004 22:03:03 +0000, Vox Humana wrote:

The problem that these stores have is not with someone buying extra nuts and bolts and returning what's not used, but with equipment. I know a guy who's very proud of the fact that every fall he "buys" a ladder from Lowes, cleans out his gutters, then returns the ladder. No worries about cost, storage, etc. I have heard that HD (and others) are modifying their return policies to try to put a stop to that kind of abuse. Hard to fault them for that.
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I have no problem with that. They should have explained the new policy instead of trying to put some spin on it that provided no information.
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As with any policy, there will always be someone who figures out how to abuse it, or circumvent it.
I saw a woman try to retun a 1/2 dead flat of annuals. It was very early in the season and we had a frost. She had planted them and dug them back up post-mortum.
They wouldn't allow the return, because the flat was sold as a flat, not the few individual plants she wanted credit for. I was glad HD stuck to their guns, but, if I were a lawyer, I'd claim they did at the time, have banners all over proclaiming "Satisfaction Guranteed or your money back." No conditions, no "*" followed by fine print.
Taken to the letter, if I were to purchase a lawn mower and become dissatisfied 3 years into use, i *should* be able to return it, no?
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HA HA Budys Here wrote:

to abuse

early in the

not the

their guns,

all over

conditions, no "*"

dissatisfied
It's very true that no matter how many restrictions you put on your return policy, eventually someone will find ways to abuse it. The trick is to find a policy that you can use as a selling point, without loosing more than you're gaining with it.
A certain technology company offers paid support at $xx an incident, or you can buy annual contracts for $xxx-$xxx, depending on how much you want covered. The per-incident charge can't be reversed if they fix the problem, but they provide a 30-day full refund for the annual contracts, even if you've made a call to tech support every day.
There are lots of advantages to the 30-day return policy. Most people who call weren't even aware that these programs were available, and haven't had a chance to evaluate whether the price is worth it. But they have an immediate problem they need solved. The return policy gives them the chance to make what could be considered an impulse buy, but they now get a 30-day cooling-off period.
Of course you already know what happens. People call in and buy annual contracts to avoid paying an charge for the single incident.
When the company rolled-out the return policy, they knew some people would do that. The policy wasn't created by idiots. But the numbers they ran said that the additional sales of annual contracts they could make because of the policy outweighed the amount of revenue lost to people who find the loophole.
Retail stores that have the "no questions asked" return policies know that they're going to spend more giving money to people who should have been asked to justify their returns, but they believe that they are making additional sales because of the policy.
This is especially good for hardware items. Some people will still return that extra nut and bolt they grabbed, but many people won't. And, more importantly, given the choice of going someplace that'll take back the excess bought, and someplace that all sales are final, people will go to the place with the better return policy -- especially people like contractors who can be repeat customers.
People returning using and ladders could be a problem. The guy who cleans out his gutters, and brings it back is a sale lost. But the guy who bought a 14' ladder, got home, got the job halfway done, and realized he needed an 18' ladder instead is different. A store credit, allowing the guy to buy that 18' ladder, might be a good solution, but what if the store doesn't have 18' ladders? Who's going to decide which customer has a valid reason for returning something, and which doesn't? What criteria will they use? How much will it cost to train people to apply the standards fairly and consistently? How many sales will be lost because potential customers won't buy because the return policy isn't liberal enough? How many customers will walk out the door scared away by an angry customer complaining (loudly) that the store won't take a return?
Sometimes the bottom line is served best by having an outrageously liberal return policy that is obviously abusable. Sometimes the bottom line is served best with a "no returns" policy. The bigger the company, the more they've likely pondered the return policy, and it's big-picture effects. And it is the big picture that counts whether you're Sears, Home Depot, or Joe's Dollar Store. You can't focus on that guy who just left the store with a refund he didn't deserve.
--
Warren H.

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Warren wrote:

Good point. I'd love to chat, but I need to run to HD and buy a conduit bending tool for a once in a lifetime outdoor electrical wiring project. Sure hope it's not the wrong color or I'll have to return it. :)
Seriously, I understand your point. I guess that HD and others have evaluated their policy and decided its just too darned liberal.
The blame is squarely on the shoulders of those who abuse the liberal policy, not those who are forced to rescind it because of jerks.
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On Thu, 29 Jul 2004 18:40:29 -0400, "Joe Sandlin"

There is another consideration. All product in HD is placed there on consignment by the manufacturers. Returns do not hurt HD's bottom line, they affect the manufacturers who supplied and bankrolled the product. I suspect that quite a few are bitching. Worked for one who was placing product from Canada, heard all about, had to design packaging for a situation where people need to touch the stuff, but we don't want too many opened.
Costco indulges in similar practices.
Shirley Hicks Toronto, Ontaro "A liberal is a conservative who's been through treatment." - Garrison Keillor
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Shirley Hicks wrote:

I had not considered that at all, but I suspect that you are correct. Thanks!

...and a conservative is a liberal who's been mugged. :)
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After six months of using an electric Ryobi trimmer, I returned it to Home Depot. I was given store credit, no questions asked other than what was wrong with it. NO receipt.
Need a good, cheap, knowledge expanding present for yourself or a friend? http://www.animaux.net/stern/present.html
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They all do the same thing. One of the biggest fish-heads they use to lure people into the store is "exclusively at such & such" or "only at HD".
It's a fact manufacturers will not sell to discount stores the exact same item the authorized dealers sell.
Same goes for their garden plants/shrubs, they sell the items wholesale nurseries can't sell to re-wholesalers. They are rejects or lesser quality than you purchase through a wholesaler or retailer. I know this because I work for the largest re-wholesaler in the nation.
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Shopping for the best price is a political choice, though that may not be readily apparent. There are lots of folks who'd rather you didn't, and lots of places where you can't.

Yes it is, isn't it?
Swyck
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I am probably more thrifty than most people. Still, I realize that the price on the shelf tag or sticker isn't the only consideration. Plants from a big box store aren't necessarily the bargain that they appear to be. Often they have wilted over and over again. Items may be dumbed down, look-alike products that are cheaper than what you might find for a little more elsewhere. Sometimes the help you get from knowledgeable sales people adds value to the product. From a political standpoint, you have to consider if the money you pay for an item will eventually be used against you or contrary to your values. Will you buy cheap now and then use tax dollars to clean up a toxic waste site left by that company. Will you buy cheap now and pay for the food stamps of the poorly paid employees? Will you buy cheap now because the store receives generous tax breaks when the established store in town goes broke and stops paying taxes. Will the store ship all the profits back to a distant headquarters, or worse, will it ship jobs overseas. Knowing that the top guy at HD earns $22 million dollars sort of disturbs me when I see people working in the stores who are obviously a paycheck away from being homeless. Knowing that a chunk of the money goes to a political movement that is unpinned by a philosophy of cheap labor also troubles me. Given that knowledge, I will shop elsewhere when I can. I'm not suggesting that anyone else should follow, nor am I ignoring the fact that people of other political conviction make purchase decisions using the same logic. The religious right has avoided Disney products for years. Others mount boycotts against media outlets like CBS. Political shopping isn't a practice owned by any particular group.
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I agree, wouldn't the HD stock holders have more influence over the CEO?

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