Hollyhock Transplanting

We had a volunteer hollyhock sprout up at the edge of our veg garden. We let it grow cause is looked a little like a squash / zucc. Its has beautiful pink flowers but is in a bad location. I've read it has some transplanting problems. Anybody have any tips?
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Wait until it dies in winter and pull all of it out, they don't take to transplanting at all. Save the seeds too.

let it

problems.
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Hollyhocks have quite large roots. I have transplanted them successfully - however, the earlier in the season the better. The best bet is when you get the soil well-moistened beforehand, and get the hollyhock up with a large clump of dirt around the roots. It will wilt pretty distressingly for 3 or 4 days, but then usually will come back if you water it well everyday until then. Afterwards, just water normally as you do other plants. The ones that seed themselves in usually are the best, most healthy plants. Those that I have come up that way often reach 6 to 8 feet with sturdy stalks. The transplants and store-bought plants often top out at 3 or 4 feet. Unfortunately, the foliage of hollyhocks is never an asset. A magnet for chewing insects and rust......

let it

problems.
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let it

problems.
If it's blooming, leave it alone. They are biennials and it will die this winter anyway. Save the seed it produces and sow it this fall where you want them to grow.
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