Re: Cats - ongoing problem

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I've never tried this, but have made the suggestion many times: fill your Supa-Soaker with water containing Ipecac Syrup, and give the cat a good squirt so you get plenty on its coat. If your timing is just right, the cat will return to its owners lounge-room carpet before starting to lick the liquid off its coat ....
Another possibility, splash or squirt it with castor oil.
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The idea is to solve the problem, not be a real jerk to the neighbor who owns the cat.
Ray

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His idea is also horribly cruel to the cat, which is just being a cat.
Just use a damned hotwire! It works every time and will keep out other furry garden pests as well, such as squirrels and rabbits... and thieving neighbors.
K.

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I've just been thinking of this for my neighbour's cat - if by hotwire you mean an electric fence?
In which case, is there technology to generate one with solar panels? i.e. some kit I could buy or make that produces the electricity in the garden, and doesn't require leads into the house?
Anita
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Yes.
And yes! There are solar kits to run electric fences. They are used a lot by sheep farmers to keep coyotes away from the flock.
K.
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wrote:

It's called a battery ;-)
Seriously, though, many old-style fence chargers used large dry cells. I believe I saw some at the Tractor Supply Company that have rechargeable batteries and solar cells. Without the battery backup, the fence won't work at night. The animals would soon figure that out.
Ray
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On Thu, 01 Apr 2004 22:39:48 -0500, Ray Drouillard wrote:

Once you convince the real jerk who owns the cat to keep it out of your garden the problem IS solved.
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Have you ever tried to keep a cat out of someone else's yard -- besides locking it indoors?
Besides that, the cat is just doing what cats do. Why torture it?
Thirdly, torturing someone's cat can get you in legal trouble.
Ray
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depends on where you live. Perfectly fair to trap (using deadly ones too) cats where I live
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On Wed, 07 Apr 2004 18:07:49 -0400, Ray Drouillard wrote:

Whether I've personally tried it or not is moot. I am aware of this tendency in cats. That's one of the (many) reasons I don't own one.
Your inability to control an animal you brought into your home is not my problem. It's yours.
It's your cat. It's your problem. Period.
I have the right to "peaceful enjoyment" of my garden which I intend to enforce. Be governed accordingly.
When YOUR problem wanders over into my yard it becomes MY problem. That's when I impose MY solution and solve the problem for both of us. My solution is to live trap and cart the animal to the local animal shelter. If you live in my neighborhood and can't find your cat, I'd suggest you look at the animal shelter sometime in the next seventy-two hours. Forty-eight if they are crowded.
I'm sorry, but just because you can not control your cat does not mean that I have to stand idly by and allow it to destroy my food.
Bill
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Put some rocks in your garden and spray them with ammonia. Cats don't like that. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Delete the obvious to reply to me personally. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
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il Sat, 10 Apr 2004 17:47:32 GMT, "Lobo" ha scritto:

Funny, cat pee is related to ammonia. My info says to avoid cleaning with ammonia as it is too similar. I imagine ammonia runoff won't help the garden none either.
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Actually, ammonia is rich in nitrogen. Anhydrous ammonia is a common commercial fertilizer.
Ray Drouillard
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snipped-for-privacy@aotearoa.invalid writes:

FYI, ammonia will cause spraying with some cats. So if you want certain toms in the neighborhood to be marking your garden, spray ammonia all around; that and the cat urine will smell just wonderful, not to mention your garden produce will not be the cleanest. It's likely a very good idea to be fully aware of the potential results of what you do before you do it.
A sure cure is the automatic sprinkler. It costs under $50, attaches to your garden hose and is powered by a 9-volt battery. I know several people who use them for cats, and they swear by them as being very effective. Besides, anything you sprayed on your garden to keep them out would have to be sprayed every day to be effective; are you ready to do that? So much simpler to buy the sprinkler; just remember to turn off the water before you walk out there. I understand they also keep away raccoons and some people use them for deer as well. Sometimes the simplest things are the best.
Glenna
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snipped-for-privacy@pmug.org (Glenna Rose) wrote:

I'll say it again....
Hotwire.
Cheap and effective, and keeps other garden pests out such as squirrels and rabbits, and larger birds.
I've used one to keep the dogs out of the garden.
It has not raised my utility bills significantly.
K.
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well, it worked in my yard ... the cat that had been coming over the back fence stayed away. It only had to be resprayed if it rained. The sprinklers didn't hit it, so I wasn't doing it every day. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Delete the obvious to reply to me personally. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
writes:

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il Sun, 11 Apr 2004 00:47:37 -0500, Katra ha scritto:

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Only if you use rubber pellets... :-(
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il Sun, 11 Apr 2004 02:48:59 -0500, Katra ha scritto:

There's solid plastic and hollow plastic. I have no idea what they're like. I was thinking of aiming 'near' them for the noise effect. The mynahs may need lead however...
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On Sun, 11 Apr 2004 02:48:59 -0500, Katra

Firing any sort of gun, even BB or pellet .. are illegal in the city limits also ..plus it's illegal to kill the birds or squirrels, cats or dogs even if in the wrong place can't be killed, it's considered cruel to kill them by means other than euthanasia. You can borrow a live trap from the humane society, or use your own to catch cats and dogs to take to the humane society. It is not illegal to let your cat wander since the very nature of the beast is to wander, however if you care about your pet cat, you will not allow it outside other than on a cat safe leash that it has been trained to properly, or in an enclosure designed for the cat..which I will not allow unless it was way above ground and had flea proof legs .. that would stop them from climbing them as there are fleas outside, and only inside when someone brings them in from their flea infested houses, or if there are pets allowed in and out of the house.
Most cats don't do well past 3 years of age outdoors in most places. They start losing more fights past 3 years of age, start getting bit and getting abscesses, even if they manage to avoid cars, dogs, and cat hating or torturing humans, they just start having more injuries that get expensive to treat when they are deep abscesses.
I just started getting kittens and never letting them outside. Then they die of old age, rather than feline infectious leukemia or the host of other diseases. Yes, vaccination is good, but not all get them soon enough or often enough.
The only time I experienced much trouble with cats in the garden is early in the season, when the ground is soft of course. Once the soil has firmed up they're not so eager to dig in it. Stretching plastic bird netting across the ground not quite laying on it, but not up high enough for them to crawl under it will discourage most as they don't like it snagging on their claws. Some would be discouraged with it just being ON the ground, so I'd try that before going to the work of changing the height until they hate it. Some would hate it when it was high enough that it did not fully suspend them but not allow them to walk very well on it. They're suspicious of unfirm footing.
Once the soil is firm but cats are still wandering and trying to dig, providing them an area that is sandy, and easy to dig, will keep them out of the rest of the yard.
No matter what you do, there will always be cats out there .. there are about as many cats as people in the world.
Janice
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