Growing watercress at home

Hi, folks,
A bunch of watercress that I bought at the supermarket several weeks ago had roots. I had never seen that before. So I took several short cuttings, and planted them in 4" plastic pots with porous potting soil. I've watered well, and I keep them constantly moist by soaking the pots in a shallow tub of water between waterings. The plants are happy and growing!
I've got two questions.
First, I can see that the plants want to grow in a prostrate position. Of the five cuttings I started, only one is forming a nice, upright rosette. The rest of the plants are spilling out the sides of their pots, dangling additional roots. So, should I plant watercress in flats instead of 4" pots? Will the plants stop expanding if I don't give those other roots a place to touch down?
Second, many of the plants are developing bronze, rather than green, foliage. I'm growing these plants on my deck, which faces south. Could they be getting too much sunlight?
Thanks for your help.
-- Rainforest laid low. "Wake up and smell the ozone," Says man with chainsaw. John J. Ladasky Jr., Ph.D.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What about setting the pots into a larger (say, 2-foot) tub filled with large stones, and then rainwater. The pots can rest on topof the stones so the leaves are level with the water, and the roots can go down into the water as they would do in a stream. It would be important to keep the water sweet, with charcoal or whatever, as these plants grow in very clean water.
They probably are getting a bit of sunburn, which will turn them bronze.
If this doesn't work, you can always consider American land cress.
s.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/23/04 3:47 PM, in article co0huh$g98$ snipped-for-privacy@news7.svr.pol.co.uk, "someone"

the surface with the roots reaching down into the soil (mud) below. It was the roots in the soil that kept the plants from being washed down stream. I'm thinking that a constant flow of cool water could be crucial but then I really don't know. Sounds like an interesting project. Let us know how you make out. Water cress is a very nutritious plant. Could 'someone' expound on the American land cress? How/what/where/when? Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Young land cress plants:
http://timtyler.freeshell.org/sprouting/crops/graphics/seeds/cress_land.jpg
Get seeds from (e.g.): http://www.cnseeds.co.uk /
--
__________
|im |yler http://timtyler.org/ snipped-for-privacy@tt1lock.org Remove lock to reply.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

My watercress in pots grows tall. Plants do also send out shoots from the root stock in all directions, though - and keep doing it if they are fed.

In watercress, old bronze leaves /can/ indicate nutritional problems - usually mineral deficiencies:
``Wild watercress or crop that was cultivated in stream beds with no additional fertilizer frequently suffers from potassium deficiency. Phosphate and iron deficiencies are also common. Symptoms of potassium deficiency are shown as marginal scorch of older leaves in this crop. Iron deficiency is common in winter under cool temperature conditions and shows as yellowing between the veins on the newer foliage.
- http://www.growingedge.com/community/archive/read.php3?c=GH&q 05
--
__________
|im |yler http://timtyler.org/ snipped-for-privacy@tt1lock.org Remove lock to reply.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.