Replace Support Trilam

We've got a rectangular carport overhang which has become waterlogged and decayed. I would like to know the best way to replace a long span of Trilam which is about to snap.
The overhang is 25' X 22', supported on 4 posts at the corners and is additionally anchored to the adjoining house. The rotted Trilam is 25' long and extends perpendicularly from the house. The roof joists all run at 16" offsets parallel to the house and are sitting in metal joist hangars. The carport sits 13' 6" off of the ground.
I am planning on using some sort of beam supported by adjustable steel columns which can jack up the carport and hold all ceiling joists in place while we remove the rotted Trilam and replace it. Is there anything we should watch out for when doing it this way? Is there a better way to do it?
I'm not sure what type of temporary beam to use or where to source the adjustable steel columns. They might need to be fabricated custom to reach 13' 6".
Any suggestions would be appreciated.
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curt wrote: ...

...
I'd suggest a couple (or even three) shorter temporary beams (4x4 w/ supports at 4-6 ft should be adequate (if it's only a carport roof it isn't that much weight). Working from one end to the other w/ a helper, set a column and w/ a jack raise to proper height, then block and move down. For ease in handling overhead, I usually will make a temporary hanger to support the beam overhead as simple as a spike and wire so don't have to muscle it up while starting the raising process. Then wedge in place using shims for final adjustments if needed and add a cleat to hold in place.
Depending on availability, I use poles cut to appropriate length or old used pipe or drill stem (but it's easily obtained as scrap here) -- where you're located will have a lot to do w/ what is a suitable and easily obtainable useful column material that is also not terribly expensive. Ideally, one would use cribbage and build solid supports so the lever arm isn't long if one were really jacking, but if it's in place and you're only using the columns as support or minimal raising back, it should be fine to use columns, especially if limit the size of the individual beams rather than trying to have one full length of the span.
Just be smart (as in cautious) in how you approach it--something as light as a carport roof isn't much of a lift really despite looking somewhat daunting if you've not done such before...
--
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On Sun, 25 May 2008 10:00:18 -0500, dpb wrote:
Thank you for your response. I was searching Googling 'cribbage' to understand what you were talking about and came across the following link to Ellis Floor Jacks - it seems to be just what the doctor ordered.
http://www.ellisok.com/ellisok/rescon.html?_kk=lally % 20column&_ktec8742-1655-48eb-9db6-96ae47e49a4b&gclid=CK64_fLxxpMCFQNaFQodj3- BCQ
Thanks again, Curt
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