Christopher Egan

Page 2 of 2  
I had forgotten about ghost sniper. Was that the kid in Seattle who kept harping about sprawl?
Seems ot me that THE DOOGS!!! got to Chris once or twice too. Whatever happened tothat guy? Is he at Gitmo?
And where's brudgers? Oh wait, I know, but I ain't tellin'!
And oh, BTW, I'm not dead yet.
Nice to see some of the old names. Even ones I've had battles with... some dating back to the turn of the century.
Of course, Don is like a cockroach, this forum will never get rid of him.
Lucky Pierre, Ken, The Multi-dimensional Piranha, Soup, er, Rico DuJour
Master architect who takes more vacations than one man should be allowed, Sir Fritz.
As for those battles, Edgar, we got into something about schools or arch education I think. And was it Dezignare that thinks all states should license ID's?
Chris weighed in on a lot of things back when this forum was more relevant. I remember a lot of back and forth with Marcello. Those guys could go on about all that history and theory stuff for days.
But mostly I remember how he could handle me. I gave him shit at times just because he was too nice. We had disagreements but he had a knack for reading the inflection in my writing without my having to resort to emoticons. It's a skill that most of the youngsters do not possess and it's so fun to see panties get wadded up.
What pissed me off about Chris was that, for the most part, he put up with fools -- sometimes by ignoring them.
It pissed me off because I haven't the strength.
Sometimes I think that I want to be like Chris when I grow up.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Michael Bulatovich wrote:

Groups are what their members make them. I still prefer the fact that there's no "baby-sitter" here as such. (You have your own if/when you want to use it [not that it necessarily works very well, or that your actions don't somehow belie your apparent use of it ;] )
On forums with "net-nannies", people drop off, too. I've spoken more about this on here before if you want to do a search.
Frankly, Don appears to be off his rocker sometimes, but then, who doesn't? ;)
"Too bad she won't live... But then again, who does?" --Bladerunner
To Chris: http://www.gdargaud.net/Humor/QuotesDeath.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Is thre any collection of his writings? I seem to recall he'd written a book or two; I cna check that, but does anyone know of anything else? He had a great many intrersting and IMO excellent thoughts, and expressed them very well and often beautifully...

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Or maybe this one? ------------------------
I guess I could start writing for days on the discussion....about half of which would be questions...so please consider this post an act of "thinking out loud" rather than a definitive reply. I won't try to make a tidy essay...just a series of thoughts.
1. Sorry....I haven't read the book but certainly someone here has.
2. My words may sound a little academic, but they are real thoughts of a practicing architect....one who only makes a living by designing real buildings for very real clients. I do believe, however, that we have the honor and the challenge to use thought in our work...even though sometimes it is no more than thought about how to get a school board to listen to its teachers. Our website has some of my papers that others have described as useful...and the intro talks about this...."The Demon of Consciousness". My own work occasionally manifests real thought...and I hope this will increase now that I am entering the "second half of life".
3. I would like to question the fundamental method of dialectics that underlies Rowe's premise as you describe it. Much thought in the 20th century (the past, you know!) used the intellectual model of dialectics...positing opposites in conflict....to describe ideas, trends, etc. While it received its most famous push from Marx (Karl, not Groucho)...this approach was so universally assumed that it was almost invisible. However, I once heard Stanislaus Fung (a delightful professor from Adelaide) remind us that there are other ways to think about phenomena....instead of seeing things as opposites in conflict, we can see them as "poles"...two ends of the same thing. For instance, most plants have roots and leaves....but they are not in opposition to each other...they are equally necessary, although different, aspects of the same reality. It is possible that the whole notion of "the idea of architecture" versus "relation to nature" is simply a failure to leave the 20th century behind. Maybe we need a new model for thinking about different aspects...Fung's idea of poles...inextricably bound to each other but different. Sadly, I think that Rowe may be right that many 20th century architects fell into the trap of using dialectical thought, and therefore felt obligated to choose between "architecture" and "nature". Fortunately there were others, notably Alvar Aalto, who rejected this and gave us another model for modernism.
4. I think there may be something to this idea of "architecture versus nature"...but only as a historical description of what people thought....not as a theoretical model for an inevitable reality. It was probably inevitable, because so much of modern thought, in all disciplines in the late 19th and early 20th century, involved a crisis of self-identity for the disciplines (the reasons can be found in any discussion of the dramatic social, technological, political and cultural changes that took place between about 1870 and 1918). Painters asked "what is painting?"...composers asked "what is music?"...physicists asked "what is matter?"...and architects asked "what is architecture?"
Of course ONE way to understand a thing is to compare it to other things and look for the differences. I think it was inevitable that some architects would look for the essence of architecture in its birth in the human mind....and to try to do this by setting up an opposition to some "natural" order.
5. I personally think the truth is more complex and interwoven (I once presented a paper in Auckland called "Dancing on the Threshold of Thought" that presents a thought-model in which opposites dance with each other instead of shooting at each other....maybe I'll post it when we do our next website housekeeping). One example is here in San Antonio...very old and very solid....and I used it to make this same point for a group of architecture students from Mexico City. In the 1700s the Spanish built a system of "acequias" throughout San Antonio...small canals to carry water to the small farms and produce gardens of the inhabitants. The water came from the river, and since the fields were always higher than the river, they needed some way to bring the water to the higher level. Now in many places this was accomplished by physically lifting the water...but the Spanish had learned another less-energy-demanding approach from the Muslims who civilized southern Spain. Instead of raising the water....they would go upstream to a point where the water level was approximately that of the fields they wanted to irrigate...and there they would build a small dam, to raise and maintain the level of the water. Then they would cut a ditch ("acequia") from the newly-created pond to the fields a few miles downstream. Now..to get to my point...so I can take my wife to dinner...there is one place at which the man-made water course must cross above a natural water course. The solution is obvious...to build an aqueduct, a bridge to carry the man-made stream over the natural stream. But for me this 250 year old elegant little stone structure, in the south side of my hometown, is a direct manifestation of the duality/polarity that is architecture. It is a clear and unapologetic construction of an intellectually-determined line, carried across a natural meandering line, and the physical manifestation is made of stone and geometry. The naturalness of nature is enhanced by the presence of the human construction...and the clarity of human thought is enhanced by its juxtaposition with the natural.
6. I think this approach I recommend can be found also in Heidegger's notion of the "world and the earth" described in "On the making of the work of art".....and in Lao Tsu.
Christopher
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Jeez. I regret to have never made his acquaintance. BTW, I chafe when non-professionals presume to tell anyone what professionalism is. "It's so.... unprofessional!"
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Can we stop with this stuff for this post at the very least, please. I'm asking nicely. Thank you.
--
Edgar



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I was referring to the both of you, and every person in this NG.
Forget it, do as you wish.
--
Edgar



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Often, but not always. Most architects in this jurisdiction work in very small firms with very little support from non-pro's. A very large minority need nothing but a printer, and a courier.

Spout off? Anybody can spout off about just about anything in our system. My point is the they do not *decide* what it is. That's done through regulation. When you are found to be unprofessional your name usually ends up published somewhere....you might also be stripped of your standing.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in message

How long before you threw the ball back onto the field?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Galina, you don't know enough to go there. "Primum non nocere."
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in message <snip>

Great story. Office dogs keep things in perspective, so to speak. They lower the blood pressure despite deadlines. They remind you to get up once in a while to take a walk.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No one's ever complained before...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Nothing worng with persistence *if* the person realizes what exactly is going on, and recognizes one's limitations. Odds are, tho', that the fellow didn't...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

THis is a sad day. I just read about two deaths.
I always enjoyed Chris' writings. Yikes...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.