your oldest power tool

mine is a skil saw from the 70s i think
seems to run fine
am curious because i wonder if they can become unsafe to use in the electrical sense and what to do besides replacemnt
guessing that replacement parts might be hard to come by
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On 1/18/2018 3:01 PM, Electric Comet wrote:

I'd guess that my Craftsman circular saw is about the vintage -- I've relegated it to the dirty task of masonry cutting. I did have an even older electric drill but it got dropped from a stepladder and bent the shaft and, seeing no way to repair it, I junked it.
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On 1/18/2018 2:01 PM, Electric Comet wrote:

Oldest still in active use would be B&D 1/2" drill in press that had been around quite a while when I was a pup...I'd guess it dates from mid-50s; certainly had been in the shop for a number of years by time I finished HS in '63; I don't remember ever _not_ having it.
There are several others of roughly same vintage in hand drills, saws, etc. The small B&D saw is one of "go to's". All that's been done to any of 'em replace power cords and a couple of bearings that I know of.
As long as internals don't fail as in wearing out or breaking gears, etc., what's to do?
Oh, I did replace the power switch on the saw a few years ago...a close-enough match to fit was in the selection at the local Ace; of course there are no actual parts available.
The latter bugs me immensely as I have at least three 3x24 belt sanders (B&D 7440 iirc) that have the motor mounted _between_ the wheels so the balance is better than anything on the market today. Unfortunately, the drive gear matching the end of the rotor wears out and there are no replacements available any longer (nor have been for 20+ yr now) and haven't been able to find anything on open source that fits. Having one machined was excessively expensive altho that raises the recent question of what might be done with new 3D printer technology? Maybe I'll take one in to the local community college machining class and see what they can do...
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I've got a 1958 8 inch Skill Worm Drive saw - replaced the power cord on it last summer. I also have a Stanley J4A power door planer from about 1954 - in perfect original operating condition.
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Unisaw 1948 vintage
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*snip*

How big of gear are we talking? How many teeth and what's the OD?
Puckdropper
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On 1/19/2018 12:13 AM, Puckdropper wrote:

It's been too long to recall exactly otomh so I'll have to dig one out to be precise, but roughly 2"OD, probably 60-tooth or so...that's probably a little high; more like in 40-ish neighborhood probably.
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That sounds doable for both 3D printing and flat milling. Most gears are hobbed from rod, but you can also just cut the gear from flat stock using a mill.
3D Printing: Shapeways can probably do that, all you need is the file. (I have not tried this, but it looks like you'll be well within the capabilities of their machine.) Here's the trick: That OD is not the OD the gear goes by. You need to figure out the pitch circle diameter. I usually do that by plugging in the number of teeth (count, count, count and count again) and OD where it says pitch circle diameter, then selecting a standard diametrical pitch or mod and recalculating the pitch circle diameter.
Depending on the tool you use, you can then print at full scale and place your gear on top of the print out. Any errors will show up.
Milling: My handy drawing program says for a 60T 2" gear, the maximum endmill is .050", I run .031" EMs in my mill all the time. It depends on how thick that gear is as to whether that tiny EM can cut it from flat stock, though. More than about 1/4" and it'll just be too big. (I might be able to carefully flip the gear over and get 1/2", but it's hard to get that exactly exact.
I'd be willing to give it a try, it'll be nice to see a usable gear come out of the machine. I often work on models with .3 mod gears and the teeth are just too fine to cut with an end mill. (If you just look at those tiny mills wrong, they break.)
Puckdropper
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On Friday, January 19, 2018 at 11:10:09 AM UTC-6, Puckdropper wrote:

How cool would that be? Hope he takes you up on it!
Love to hear how it turns out if you go forward.
Robert
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On 1/19/2018 11:10 AM, Puckdropper wrote: ...

Thanks...I intended to go get the pieces-parts out of the drawer yesterday while was nice out but got side-tracked on "must-do's" and didn't get that far. I'll try to follow up although as I begin to recollect, it seems that now I'm recalling it is actually the worm gearing cut on the end of the rotor shaft or the matching gear to it that drives the larger that is the set of matching teeth that give out.
The tiny diameter (3/8"???) worm drives the primary drive gear; it's a two-gears-in-one arrangement where the inside matches the worm and the outer drives the rest of the gear chain so it's not just a single flat gear.
As said, I need to go get pieces and make pitchures...I don't believe I ever found a parts drawing online to point at.
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No rush, and now that I think of it they might have used helical gears. I can cut a spur gear without much trouble, but helical is another story. I'm not going to be able to cut a helical gear with my current set up.
I wonder if I could cut a form into a piece of O1, then use that like a milling cutter with a rotary table to make the helical gear?
Obviously I can't promise anything, especially if they're helical gears.
Puckdropper
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On 1/21/2018 11:54 AM, Puckdropper wrote: ...

That's good there's no rush since it's probably been nearly 15 years since I've had one functional. :)
I did buy one off eBay a few years ago that is still functional but it has some motor "issues" -- it runs, but not well and I've not taken the time to delve into it much.
There's one w/ the cover off been sitting on a bench for years in one of the garages--I glanced at it today and it is indeed the rotor end that's the most worn of all; does look like it's straight gear but it's milled directly in the rotor shaft; not tied onto the end. Not sure if doing anything with that would be feasible unless could fill in the missing metal and recut...
That one was never finished tear-down; still grease-covered (with a lot of accumulated dirt/sawdust since :) ) so I'll have to clean it up or get one of the other sets of parts to make pictures of and take some measurements.
I have a Makita that is about closest there is on market to match but they took a 4" machine and just put 3" rollers on it so it's too wide for the belt and unbalanced left-right because weight isn't centered over the belt. The little 3-wheeler looks kinda' cute and might be nice, but they're just 3x21 so all the 24" belt stock is useless...
I've requested numerous times B&D bring the 7440 back with a little better gearing, but never got anywhere obviously.
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Regarding the motor gear: the other option you have is to grind off the gear teeth and start with a smooth shaft. It'd be much easier to cut a gear with that bore than it would to cut a gear on that shaft. Especially if we're talking about filling in new metal, where there's very little chance of things being a consistent hardness.
Puckdropper
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On 1/22/2018 1:07 AM, Puckdropper wrote:
...[snip for brevity]... dpb

Indeed; it would be teeny to cut all the teeth down but to make concentric and round wouldn't be too hard. Oh, but then there would be very little room left between new ID and existing OD to match existing size to match up with the driven...but, I suppose, still at least in realm of possible...
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How about pressing out the existing shaft and replacing with a new one??
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On 1/22/2018 10:43 AM, Clare Snyder wrote:

I'd guess that not possible from the rotor that I suspect the windings and all are such that wouldn't be able to get the shaft out without destroying it...but, I can look at how it's assembled.
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On 1/22/2018 10:43 AM, Clare Snyder wrote: ...

'membered model number off by a digit -- it's 7450 instead 7440.
Here's bestest schematic found...gives an idea how it's built; the rotor 19 and gears 16,18 are the weak links; 5 and 10 never show any significant wear at all...
<https://www.toolpartsdirect.com/blackdecker-7450-type-2-belt-sander-115v.html
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On 1/18/2018 4:39 PM, dpb wrote:

My dad used to work for Western Electric back in the lat 40's and early 50's. I inherited his company soldering iron and it has to be at least 63 years old, he no longer worked for Western Electric when I was born.
My oldest power tools that I still have is a B&D drill, I got for Christmas, when I was 13.
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wrote:

Speaking of Christmas, I have a Christmas cactus that my mother bought the year I was born. Dad's drill is long gone. Never liked it.
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On 1/19/2018 9:55 PM, snipped-for-privacy@notreal.com wrote:

Wow! We'da killed the Christmas cactus long before now. LOL. I wife gets one about every 4~5 years and it will last about 3 years. IIRC all you have to do is water it. LOL
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