used lumber

not sure the species but unless it was teak or something it seems way too high of a price
https://www.repurposedmaterialsinc.com/snow-fence/
and it is some nasty looking stuff as it is
it might reveal something nice but will require fair bit of work
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It might be ok if you can make use of those boards as-is, but if you're going to plane them down and get to the nice wood underneath you might as well just buy what you want from the lumber yard.
There's some beautiful stuff that can be made with rough boards, I had some that I planed down minimally but still kept it rough and turned it into a great picture frame. Grandma liked rustic, so I figured she'd love that frame... Which she did.
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Given it's sourced from the west, it's likely that the boards are douglas fir. Perhaps even some old-growth. Very pretty, durable wood when surfaced. May even be a few quarter sawn.
At $12 each for 8bf, that's less than $2.00/BF, which doesn't seem a bad deal at all.
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On Tuesday, May 15, 2018 at 6:14:33 PM UTC-5, Scott Lurndal wrote:

s

$1.50 board foot. Good price if you have a need for 2" thick wood. Proble m is most furniture and other wood items use 3/4 or 4/4 wood. Not 8/4. So to get the right thickness, you have to plane it in half. You're sort of paying double the price. But even $3.00 board foot is not outrageous.
But the big problem I see is the description says there are bolt holes in t he wood. Bolt holes in 8 foot lengths of wood mean you end up with lots of 2-3-4 foot lengths of wood to use. Short boards aren't too useful.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

You mean you get to cut it in half and get two boards! :) I'm only joking, the stuff is probably plenty warped.
You're sort of paying double the price. But even $3.00 board foot is not outrageous.

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On 5/15/2018 9:55 PM, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Not if you resaw.

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On 5/15/2018 6:14 PM, Scott Lurndal wrote: ...

_Maybe_, I'd guess for the purpose the chances are higher it's Ponderosa or other pines; what fir might be in it, like the rest will be #3 and less to begin with more than likely.
Plus, they likely won't tell you what it is nor promise you get what this pictures if they would/can tell you...what you'll get is what they choose to ship...a fair fraction which will be pretty-much gone and there's no recourse if it all looks like top board here:
<https://www.repurposedmaterialsinc.com/snow-fence/den-snow-fence-wood-2-x-6-x-8-10pc/ > At $12 each for 8bf, that's less than $2.00/BF, which doesn't seem

Unless you have a specific use for the patina/look, I'd venture it's not worth 10% of the asking price as "lumber"
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On 5/15/2018 6:14 PM, Scott Lurndal wrote: ...

For comparative value I just day-before-yesterday bought 12 full-dimension 3x12x12 oak oil-field timbers from local lumber yard for $488 (before tax) which works out at $1.13/bft +/-.
Were mix of red/white; I used 10 for the new stock tanks platform base, two were so nice I ended up saving them for other purposes as had run low on stuff over 5/4 and have ideas of needing some larger dimension material for cabinet bases here relatively soon...
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Out here in sunny california, there isn't much reclaimed lumber, and when there is, it's not cheap (e.g. aforementioned doug fir), but can be pretty.
I'd love 12/4 wide oak timbers for 1.13 bft.
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On 5/16/2018 3:16 PM, Scott Lurndal wrote:
...

The movement has struck; it's now trendy and market apparently bears exorbitant pricing; used to be salvage material was a bargain; not so much any more it seems.
I've found that even the auto-parts salvage folks are close to the price of new stuff if you can even find what you're looking for... :(

Part of reason for the mentioning was that, depending upon where you are, if you look for alternatives for material than that being sold as finish lumber or similar, you just might find a deal. These are sold as timbers with the primary market out here being the oil-fields so are roughsawn and not kiln-dried although they're not just fresh green wood, either, but they are much cheaper on a bd-ft basis if you can take what they are as adequate.
In SW VA and E TN, the small local mills cut similar timbers for coal mines and some for ties; could get quite good pricing on those as compared to 4/4, 5/4, 6/4 lumber...
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On Wednesday, May 16, 2018 at 4:13:40 PM UTC-5, dpb wrote:

Yep. If you have a nearby mill, a good bargain might be a short drive awa y.
I've used a local mill for 30+ yrs. This walnut log - https://www.flickr . com/photos/43836144@N04/8141498429/in/photostream - and part of another co st $125 to mill. We hit 2 nails, so included in that price was $26 each fo r 2 Mizer bandsaw blades. I suppose it cost $150-$200 to deliver the logs to the mill. I calculated I got 410 bf ft of lumber. Similar pricing f or other logs I've had milled over the years.
Caveats: 1) It's convenient to have space and time for drying green wood. 2) Our nut trees/lumber, down here, have tendency to twist and warp, more so, than lumber further north. I've always understood our wet climate and shorter (winter) dormant period makes for these nut woods/lumber to have a greater tendency to warp and twist, more so than northern nut woods. 3) Sometimes, it's lots of work doing the finish milling. I don't know i f kiln drying would reduce the warping and twisting. I've never had lumbe r kiln dried. *Likewise, sometimes, it's lots of work prepping salvaged lu mber. 4) The older you get, doing those logging and salvaging tasks seem to be m ore work, than play, as it was when younger. So, if you have the space, ga ther your play-lumber before you get too old.... or lazy.
Another economical way to obtain used (specifically cabinet) lumber is to g o steal it from your brother's barn, when he's not home.
Sonny
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Yeah, my dad has that luxury. Here's what he did with the Walnut tree next to the house that he had milled:
http://www.lurndal.org/images/gfclock.jpg
He made three of them from the one tree.
All I have is Coastal Live Oak and Palm, neither of which make good lumber, and only one is useful as firewood.
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On Thu, 17 May 2018 14:33:27 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) wrote:

The Coastal Live Oaks use to a national resource that had protections, seem the y branching sections were a prized commodity in ship building.
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On Thursday, May 17, 2018 at 9:12:57 AM UTC-5, Sonny wrote:

way.

r.com/photos/43836144@N04/8141498429/in/photostream - and part of another cost $125 to mill. We hit 2 nails, so included in that price was $26 each for 2 Mizer bandsaw blades. I suppose it cost $150-$200 to deliver the lo gs to the mill. I calculated I got 410 bf ft of lumber. Similar pricing for other logs I've had milled over the years.

e so, than lumber further north. I've always understood our wet climate a nd shorter (winter) dormant period makes for these nut woods/lumber to have a greater tendency to warp and twist, more so than northern nut woods.

if kiln drying would reduce the warping and twisting. I've never had lum ber kiln dried. *Likewise, sometimes, it's lots of work prepping salvaged lumber.

more work, than play, as it was when younger. So, if you have the space, gather your play-lumber before you get too old.... or lazy.

go steal it from your brother's barn, when he's not home.

Your story only includes the cost of milling the wood and transporting it. It DOES NOT include the cost of the tree itself. Its OK to leave that cos t as zero if the tree is on your own land or someone gives you the tree. B ut your story seriously under estimates the cost of lumber by not including the raw material cost of the tree. And maybe the cost of the chainsaws an d labor to cut it down and limb it. Kind of like a house fixer upper who o nly includes their renovation costs and excludes the original cost to buy t he broken down house. You got to add all the costs to get the true price.
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On Thursday, May 17, 2018 at 10:12:57 AM UTC-4, Sonny wrote:

way.

r.com/photos/43836144@N04/8141498429/in/photostream - and part of another cost $125 to mill. We hit 2 nails, so included in that price was $26 each for 2 Mizer bandsaw blades. I suppose it cost $150-$200 to deliver the lo gs to the mill. I calculated I got 410 bf ft of lumber. Similar pricing for other logs I've had milled over the years.

e so, than lumber further north. I've always understood our wet climate a nd shorter (winter) dormant period makes for these nut woods/lumber to have a greater tendency to warp and twist, more so than northern nut woods.

if kiln drying would reduce the warping and twisting. I've never had lum ber kiln dried. *Likewise, sometimes, it's lots of work prepping salvaged lumber.

more work, than play, as it was when younger. So, if you have the space, gather your play-lumber before you get too old.... or lazy.

go steal it from your brother's barn, when he's not home.

I love Your Project Pictures Sonny . You really make use of the Wood's unique Charecter in your Artful pieces. I bet You make lot's of sawdust and chips, Great for mulching too !
Me I just fix antiques most of them i ger free a lot of basket cases and so me need parts made . I hardly ever throw away wood. I'll pickup a lot of old wood parts at the recycling center to make replace ment parts. Can't get enough of that good old hardwood. That old european furniture wood is really hard to match. Veneers now that's a whole different subject.I collect all I can of that st uff I steam it off with a clothing steam iron putty knives and plaster trow els. lots a work I think Art is hard to price sometimes I make pennies per hour.
Keep a Goin' Sonny rick B.
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On Friday, May 18, 2018 at 9:47:21 AM UTC-5, Rick the antique guy wrote:

Hey!! You been sneaking 'round, peeping through my shop windows? Last night's doings - https://www.flickr.com/photos/43836144@N04/4129164231 5/in/dateposted-public/
"Art" should be taken lightly, as to my doings. Often, I have an idea, the n execute a hit-or-miss approach. Just so happens, I have a bit of improv ised woodworking skills, which results in something that looks reasonable.
From the pic above, page right for 2 more pics, . The blocks, with holes, are improvised 1.5" PVC pipe connections. All corners/edges will be roun ded off
The project is to make a new frame for a damaged canopy, similar to this ki nd of canopy- https://www.walmart.com/ip/Quik-Shade-Weekender-Elite-10-x10- Straight-Leg-Instant-Canopy-100-sq-ft-coverage/40491864 These canopies' frames don't hold up in moderate+ winds. I kept an undama ged canopy cover and now trying to make a new legs/frame. We'll see how i t works out by this evening or tomorrow.
Despite Mom's "handicap" and older age, she still likes being outside, spec ifically sitting in her garage, viewing the outdoors, flowers, birds, etc. The afternoon sun beams down in/near her sitting area. We've had canopie s in front of the garage doorway, blocking the sun. We've been buying/rep lacing broken-frame canopies with new ones. I'll see whether an improvise d PVC frame will hold up better, than the original frame.
Sonny
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"Electric Comet" wrote in message

Having seen some of those fences up close while bicycle touring through the Rockies I suspect that they were made with a utility grade of wood. They've also been subjected to a lot of weather... If you aren't interested in the "look" then these boards probably are not worth messing with....
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On Wed, 16 May 2018 10:12:59 -0400

weather and bolt holes
mostly the price caught my eye and i like to see things get new uses and the business is interesting and not easy
back to the wood it would be challenging to put that to use at that price and in that condition
as is what might someone use it for
would expect massive warping as is and that is hard to work with
the only thing i could think of is another fence of some kind
maybe it could be steamed into submission and used
with a steam box big enough to hold a bundle maybe it could be worked again
when i encounter very warped wood i usually cut it small enough to get some straight pieces but usually it end in the fireplace
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