techshop gone

techshop.ws could not create a sustainable business model and is gone
all the us locations are closed
was sad to hear about this because a lot of people were able to access equipment that they just would not have otherwise
also over 3000 vets had used techshop
the website is gone and only has a single pdf which is interesting to read
they had a good run
if there is one near you there is probably going to be a lot of equipment up for sale soon
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On Thu, 16 Nov 2017 16:35:22 -0800

they filed chapter 7 which means it is completely over and no chance for more funding or anything else
there is an email address to send inquiries to for buying equipment or any other assets

there were some overseas techshops but they were managed and financed independently and they are still in operation
wonder what they did that was different
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You mean, other than change the term from "hobbyist" to "maker"?
IOW, why do hobby-shops not have "open source" workshops. Lowe's? Home Depot? Cuz there's NO $$$$ in it!! DUH!
Jes cuz a buncha 'greedy bastids' thought stupid millennials would fall for a simple name change (they did), doesn't mean millennials aren't also cheap. Seen many mils paying monthly membership in a health clubs (say it fast, five times). ;)
nb
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Not sure you meant there to be a question mark at the end of the last sentence but there are a fair number of millennials at the gym I go to. It's the most expensive one around, too. Millenials are at least as vane as boomers were.
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I'm so happy for you! Are you a "maker", also? <--- Did I get it right? ;)
nb
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Jus saying that your comment about millennials is nonsense.
I don't know what a "maker" is, in this context. I'm a boomer, if that tells you anything.
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On Saturday, November 18, 2017 at 8:00:43 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@notreal.com wrote:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maker_culture
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On Sat, 18 Nov 2017 19:09:18 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

Yeah, I got that but don't understand what it has to do with the price of oats in China.
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Likewise.
"Maker culture".....
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maker_culture>
....is what we "boomers" usta call "DIY'ers" or "hobbyists". Greedy jerks gave it a different name soley to capitalize on the new term.
I have a "Maker" electronics book to make/learn electronics. It's a "spend lotsa $$$$" approach to learning electronics and teaches almost nothing, but I foolishly spent $30 to discover that fact. See the recent closure of "open-source" tech shops? They also called them "Maker" shops.
"Makers" go to "Maker" fairs, write "Maker" books. sell "Maker" junk, etc. It's all jes a scam. ;)
nb
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notbob wrote:

Any opinions on this one (being a 4th edition, it seems to have been around a while). I recently added it to my "wish list". (Amazon.com product link shortened)11133446&sr=8-1&
I'm open to alternatives.
Bill
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I wasn't too fond of it. It's much too bulky to be a good reference and too referency to be much of anything else.
Puckdropper
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http://www.puckdroppersplace.us/rec.woodworking
A mini archive of some of rec.woodworking's best and worst!
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There are soooo many websites teaching electronics, you jes hafta find one you like. Even the entire Navy electronics course is on the net. To pay anyone to learn electronics is a fools game.
nb
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wrote:

It looks an awful lot like the "Electronics for Scientists" text that was popular when I was an undergrad 40-some years back. That text had enough to get you interested but not enough to actually do anything.
The kids today seem to get a Raspberry Pi and futz with it and if the bug bites then they grow from there, if it doesn't then they've got a nice, cheap, low-powered spare computer.
Don't overlook YouTube--there's a lot more there than you might expect--even course content from MIT.
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J. Clarke wrote:

As a matter of coincidence, since Youtube noticed I was interested a couple of weeks ago, they have been offering me a steady diet. The last video I watched discussed the divergence of the technologies (parts) used by product manufacturers, versus that used by hobbyists, since the 70's say. Basically, robots aren't good at assembling the traditional components that have wires and prefer "flat" components (my words) without long pins. As a results, hobbyists can't quite get the same technology as manufacturers have without being willing to learn to use the flat (and very small) technology, which is much more cumbersome, especially for beginners.
So far, my biggest accomplishment is learning to use (induction) coils, diodes (rectifier?) and a capacitor to convert ac current into direct current (all designed and implemented in a YouTube video!) :) I actually made induction coils (for "shock" value) following instructions from a book ("The Boy Electrician") when I was in 8th grade. I downloaded the book online, just out of sentimental value/curiosity, a few years ago.
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wrote:

There is also a higher mountain of learning needed for many "reasonable" (what do you want that you can't buy cheaply) projects. That's why the Arduino, and such, are popular. Much of the infrastructure is done.
Ham radio has been pretty much killed by the Internet, too, though it was already going downhill well before.

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On Monday, November 20, 2017 at 1:34:37 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@notreal.com wrote:

And Breaker! Breaker! has been replaced with Ok Google. ;-)
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On Mon, 20 Nov 2017 11:17:21 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

LOL!
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Yet, that kid (James Kim) who died --and tested and reported on all the latest high-tech communications hand helds-- and almost lost his family, up in OR, mighta survived if he knew some old school morse code (CW) and hadda basic QRP rig.
I'm no ham, but I always wondered about that. QRP is essentially "low pwr" (under 5W), and using CW, can easily reach out with a minor antenna.
If I've learned anything --much like touch-typing-- learn Morse code while yer young. ;)
<http://www.eham.net/reviews/products/22
nb
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That was eleven years ago. A bit late for a coulda/shoulda isn't it? He might have survived if he had a satelite phone, too.

His kids would be 14/15 and 11/12 now. You could teach them.
(Not sure where they are living now, I knew the wife's San Francisco store, but it has been closed since 2008.)
And about Techshop, since I'm someone who was in the target market:
* The facilties were nice, but the prices were too high. And it's different using rental ship. * I don't have a lot of room for tools or for working, but at least I don't have to schlep all my materials too and from a workshop that's costing me money whether or not I'm using it.
I'm not a milennial, but I do feel affiliated to the "Maker" movement. I've been to more than a dozen Maker Faires, which I find a good place to get inspiration for doing new things, both within my comfort zone and out of it. My wife makes a good living on the textile side of the Maker movement selling simple sewing patterns and teaching sewing to first timers. (Most of the money comes from the patterns, not the teaching, which is much more limited audiences.) She's shown her work at four or five Maker Faires in three cities.
The Maker Movement is child to the Popular Mechanics projects. They are not in-depth nor are they the most basic foundation, but inspiring and fun.
Elijah ------ useful in a world where off-the-shelf is so common
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Actually, I've been asking this question fer all those yrs. Having once lived in OR, I KNOW where he went.

.....or if he'd never turned down that particular road. My "what-if" is no different than your "what-if".

Pretty much my entire point, in this thread. If you wanna "make this part of a larger conversation", be my guest. ;)
nb
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