Stanley Router

So I was going through the tools I brought home from my parents condo, the tool I remember my dad using was his router a Stanley 8-B. It is still in running condition has a bit in it that is sharp. It is the memories with old tools that are the best.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
replying to Markem, Iggy wrote: Absolutely! Until, you realize what piece of crap the thing is.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 16 Nov 2017 13:44:04 GMT, Iggy

You have no idea as to what you are talking about other than trying to goad me into something.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
replying to Markem, Iggy wrote: Nope, just my own experience and I'm sorry you couldn't even take that comment light heartedly, tough room. I don't goad nor go after anyone, but I do stand up for myself. True idiots (like yourself, now apparent) vulture me and then, unbelievably, paint me as the troll for simply sticking to my guns, which are true and correct. But, I'm expected to be a drooling spineless wimp and agree with their very wrong take on EVERYTHING to not be a troll by the rest of their gay clique. Hooray for you, Dad was a dumb cheapskate. His dumb fits you perfectly.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thursday, November 16, 2017 at 4:14:07 PM UTC-5, Iggy wrote:

"I don't goad nor go after anyone"
"Dad was a dumb cheapskate"
Standing up for yourself one-on-one against Markem is your right. Going after his Dad, who has not said a single word to or about you, just makes you a bigger asshole than you usually are.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
replying to DerbyDad03, Iggy wrote: Learn how to read, the tool brought up his dipshit Dad. What makes me an asshole? Giving back what's moronically and baselessly hurled at me? Yeah, it's a wonder why the world's so stupid with Dad's like you raising Mama's boys like Markem.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 17 Nov 2017 03:14:03 GMT, Iggy

No, Iggy. You make you an asshole.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thursday, November 16, 2017 at 10:14:07 PM UTC-5, Iggy wrote:

Yep, he brought up his dad...and then you proceeded to insult his dad. If you don't think that makes you an asshole, you don't know the definition.
Wait...maybe you aren't an asshole. You might have us all fooled. Maybe you're just a troll.
Either way, you're useless.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
replying to DerbyDad03, Iggy wrote: Uh huh. I make a NON-derogatory comment, as usual, and even completely agree with the dumbass just to get told to f-off. Yep, I'm the dick, but dickless isn't. Great. I need me some of that autism stuff, then maybe you douchebags will start making sense.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 16 Nov 2017 13:32:59 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

He (my dad) died two years ago in December, the Stanley Router was bought back in 1968 I think was not a cheap tool. The fact that it runs like a champ only at just under 40 years might disprove Iggy's thoughts, which carry's a weight less than a hydrogen atom nuclei.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thursday, November 16, 2017 at 8:30:11 PM UTC-6, Markem wrote:

It was definitely NOT a cheap tool. Not cheaply made, and not cheap in purc hase. At that time, Stanley had not "homeowner" or throwaway tool line. AL L of their products were made here and were considered trade or craftsman t ools. We had two, just two tool stores here, and everyone else went to Sea rs, Montgomery Wards, and even Penney's for less hard working tools.
At those two stores, for me as a young man learning the trades, it was like going to church. The brands were Millers Falls, Blue Grass, Milwaukee (ju st a very few tools then), Porter Cable, Rockwell, and Stanley. EVERYTHING there was expensive, but you bought it there because it was meant to be us ed to make a living day in and day out. Unlike today's tools, they were mea nt to be repaired. You put switches, bearings, brushes and replaced an occ asional broken part on those tools and they lasted for years.
Not as old, but the only drill I owned for years that was used to drill woo d and and metal and also used a driver is a Milwaukee hole shooter. It is 42 years old, runs great, still has some power to it. When I could buy a B lack and Decker drill for (literally) $7, this drill cost $115 or so.
Likewise my oldest circular saw. It is the same vintage, has had 3 or 4 tr iggers put in it, at least that many sets of brushes, and has had the beari ngs in it replaced 3 times. It is a Milwaukee, too. It is a Milwaukee bec ause I couldn't afford the Millers Falls or Stanley top line circular saw.
So yeah, take it from someone that probably used that exact router from way back when, it is a great tool and still has a lot of road miles left on it .

And yet, you guys can't wait to respond to him. You drag him along in thes e threads, they take a bad turn and then no one wants to participate. I wa s personally hoping to hear more stories of guys that tools that had a spec ial meaning to them, but when the threads devolve into responding to troll bait, the last few folks here that participate shrug their shoulders and wa lk off.
Isn't there any way you guys, knowing that he is a deliberately inflammator y troll, can find a way or the strength to ignore him?
Robert
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 17 Nov 2017 08:43:38 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"
Could ignore him, but was hoping get so pissed off he would voilate HOH TOS then get him thrown off it, but I guess I am letting that go.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 16 Nov 2017 21:14:02 GMT, Iggy

Tempted but nah refer Iggy to AUK for the entertainment value, that is not right cause he is not of usenet. Such a predictable asshat you are sir.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wednesday, November 15, 2017 at 6:16:01 PM UTC-6, Markem wrote:

My grandfather was a notorious skinflint, and thought tools were a necessar y evil he had to have to do minor home repairs and work on his fishing boat and trailer. He bought the absolutely cheapest tools he could and never t ook care of them.
My Dad learned from his Dad, and in fairness, neither of them made a living using hand tools. My Dad loved a good bargain on a tool, and when he pass ed most of the tools he had were of no value or were broken simply from the ir low quality.
There was one time he bought a good tool; he sprang for a Rockwell circular saw, the famous 346C. By the time I went in the trades in '72 it was alre ady and old timer and was only in production a couple more years after that . It was his only big investment in tools and he loved that saw. I came w ith its own steel case, a special set of wrenches to remove the blade and a tube of genuine "Rockwell machinery grade lubricating grease". My Dad lov ed that saw and never made anything but straight cuts with it. He kept it clean, greased, and worked the hell out of it even on small projects becaus e he never would buy a new blade. The saw was always working harder than i t should have.
But I remember back in those days when I was shown how to touch up a circul ar saw blade with a #8 mill bastard file. If the blade had not been damage d in use and all you were doing was sharpening, then with a file you could get an edge on the blade that was better than any edge you got from the fac tory. Although that saw hasn't been turned on in 20 years, I still have it .
My fondest memory of him and his prized saw was how completely pleased the look on his face was after I hand sharpened a blade for him and let him cut a couple of boards with his first hand filed blade. He loved that saw, an d that file sharpened blade made him love it even more. Those hand filed b lades are still on the "saw blade card" I made for him. Some are still sha rp as he didn't want to use them enough to dull the edges, even though that was the reason I sharpened them in the first place.
My Dad and me didn't have much in common. But something he could spend hou rs talking to me about was building little projects and using that saw. I am glad I still have it.
Robert
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thursday, November 16, 2017 at 1:16:58 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote :

ary evil he had to have to do minor home repairs and work on his fishing bo at and trailer. He bought the absolutely cheapest tools he could and never took care of them.

ng using hand tools. My Dad loved a good bargain on a tool, and when he pa ssed most of the tools he had were of no value or were broken simply from t heir low quality.

ar saw, the famous 346C. By the time I went in the trades in '72 it was al ready and old timer and was only in production a couple more years after th at. It was his only big investment in tools and he loved that saw. I came with its own steel case, a special set of wrenches to remove the blade and a tube of genuine "Rockwell machinery grade lubricating grease". My Dad l oved that saw and never made anything but straight cuts with it. He kept i t clean, greased, and worked the hell out of it even on small projects beca use he never would buy a new blade. The saw was always working harder than it should have.

ular saw blade with a #8 mill bastard file. If the blade had not been dama ged in use and all you were doing was sharpening, then with a file you coul d get an edge on the blade that was better than any edge you got from the f actory. Although that saw hasn't been turned on in 20 years, I still have it.

e look on his face was after I hand sharpened a blade for him and let him c ut a couple of boards with his first hand filed blade. He loved that saw, and that file sharpened blade made him love it even more. Those hand filed blades are still on the "saw blade card" I made for him. Some are still s harp as he didn't want to use them enough to dull the edges, even though th at was the reason I sharpened them in the first place.

ours talking to me about was building little projects and using that saw. I am glad I still have it.

You should use the saw to make something in his honor. Some "little project ", like he would have used it for.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.