rail and stiles use for outdoor projects?

I have been contemplating using rails and stiles for some flower planters and a fence for the back yard. My concern is if they will hold up to rain, and freezing weather. I can see how water can become trapped in the lower rail. Any good experiences doing this with outdoor projects and any advice?
Thanks, Dave,
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On Wednesday, May 22, 2019 at 10:21:58 AM UTC-7, Dave wrote:

Thick sections (2x6?) of southern yellow pine can stand weather for a few years, and you can make joints with pegs (most glues hold water or soften, neither is great for longevity). If you can arrange drainage, that helps. Lower rail groove for panel should have drain holes (after all, they won't show) . A bit of a kerf on the underside of the upper and lower rails will form a drip edge, like one sees on windowsills.
Oil stain will give a few years' coverage, too (be prepared to reapply in 2025).
Red cedar can make slats for panels (or shiplapped, if you want to eliminate cracks) but isn't very structural.
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wrote:

Why not PT, with the above details to shed water? Any fasteners had better be stainless, however.
Another alternative is PVC. 5/4s is readily available at HD, now, and not too expensive. Not structural, however. It gets pretty soft in hot weather.

Oils primer with a latex top coat works quite well. Some paints are really good, too. Oil primer adheres to the wood better than latex but latex has better UV protection. In any case, money paid for the stain/paint now saves a lot of work later.

White Oak or IPE would be a good choice for structural uses. Of course, cost is no object, right? ;-)
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On Thursday, May 23, 2019 at 6:13:59 PM UTC-7, snipped-for-privacy@notreal.com wrote:

PT is ugly, and doesn't weather well . Wood with stain is intended to be out in rain and sunlight, but PT was intended to resist rot/fungus/insects when buried. Parts of my covered deck are PT, and were much improved by staining.
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On 5/24/2019 12:50 AM, whit3rd wrote:

Actually you should investigate before buying PT lumber. Little of it is rated for any ground contact at all. PT fence posts may be the exception.
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wrote:

The brown PT looks sooo much better than the green.
https://www.homedepot.ca/product/micropro-sienna-2-x-6-x-12-treated-wood/1000790082
"Micro Pro Sienna can be used above, below ground and in fresh water " according to the pdf file link.
John T.
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On 5/24/2019 1:17 PM, snipped-for-privacy@ccanoemail.ca wrote:

And the yellow treated too.
There is a process, although expensive, that simply treats the wood, any wood with high heat. This process renders the wood non consumable to mold, rot, and bugs. And apparently it is ggod to use anywhere.

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wrote:

Most PT isn't supposed to be exposed to the weather. It's rot resistant, however it's still susceptible to water and UV damage. There is PT rated for "ground contact" but it's a different beast that what people normally buy at the BORG. PT _should_ be covered with UV paint or stain.
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