Quality 1/4 plywood for project

I need to make a few of these bad boys.
https://halcyonyarn.com/weaving/66000210/harrisville-195--ski-shuttle
The base is 1/4" plywood that's bend to form the ski. It needs to be high quality plywood, but I'm not sure what to ask for or look for. Is there a name or name brand of plywood that I should be buying?
Thanks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sunday, January 6, 2019 at 7:20:10 PM UTC-6, Michael wrote:

Why not buy some air dried oak or ash, rip some 3/16 slats, sand to 1/8", then laminate your own? A WWII blade would cut 1/8 (or less) slats, leaving little to no saw marks, hence no sanding. Thin slats are easy to bend to form.
I think bending plywood involves heating the ply before bending or while bent..... Hot press type jig for bending.
Sonny
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sunday, January 6, 2019 at 8:25:05 PM UTC-6, Sonny wrote:

J. Clarke and Sonny, Thanks for the input! I think you are right. Given the width of the ski, the cuts will not be that difficult. Also, gluing my own veneers will be mean the project won't take long to complete (won't have to wait for the bend to dry).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 6 Jan 2019 17:20:07 -0800 (PST), Michael

Looks like cold-molded to me. Buy or cut the veneers, make a form, glue it up in the shape.
Here are a couple of videos: <
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OQfrQXvbwtE
<
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S8cQz4rSit8

You could also bend solid wood.
Generally speaking plywood is not bendable after manufacture. There is some that is flexible but that kind won't hold a bend without support.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 06 Jan 2019 21:34:36 -0500, J. Clarke

Actually with heat and moisture it is possible to bend some plywoods by "relaxing" the glue.. I think I'd try doing it in solid though. Only about 20inches long ---
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sunday, January 6, 2019 at 8:56:18 PM UTC-6, Clare Snyder wrote:

gh quality plywood, but I'm not sure what to ask for or look for. Is there a name or name brand of plywood that I should be buying?

Clare, Yes, it's not at all difficult to steam and bend 1/4 thick plywood. It will just take a while for it to dry properly after the bend. I don't kn ow if there's a name for high quality plywood with quality wood and no glue voids that people use to make, for example, boxes or cases.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 6 Jan 2019 19:13:23 -0800 (PST), Michael

baltic birch or russian birch - or aircraft grade plywood.
The Baltic stuff is pretty widelyavailable.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sunday, January 6, 2019 at 9:37:02 PM UTC-6, Clare Snyder wrote:

e
high quality plywood, but I'm not sure what to ask for or look for. Is the re a name or name brand of plywood that I should be buying?

d. It will just take a while for it to dry properly after the bend. I don't know if there's a name for high quality plywood with quality wood and no g lue voids that people use to make, for example, boxes or cases.

Thank you!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sunday, January 6, 2019 at 7:13:25 PM UTC-8, Michael wrote:

That's going to depend. Not all woods soften with steam, not all plywood layups and glues are the same. There ARE bending-grade plywood products, but for anything other than weak cylinder bends, gluing up your own individual plies is better (and very controllable).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.