Porch railing

Our house is about 10 years old. Four years ago we had the porch painted, and within a year the paint started coming of in square inch pieces.
It appeared that treated lumber had been used and not properly primed before the originally being painted. The guy that painted it four years ago, only sanded and painted.
It became obvious that more was needed and I started to take the paint off with paint stripper. It quickly became obvious that this may not be the best way as at the rate I was going it would take a year.
I asked a painter for a quote, and got it but he highly recommended going with one of the new composite railings.
Is any one knowledgeable about this type of material for porches?
Does it come in 12' lengths as would be needed for the porch?
Is there any better suggestion to get a porch rail that will last for a while, with minimal maintenance.
Thank you in advance
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On 11/13/18 9:04 AM, Keith Nuttle wrote:

Which composite? They are not all the same. As for railing that lasts, there's always metal. Composite isn't cheap and there are several price levels with metal, some of which may the same or cheaper than composite.
I don't know the architecture of your house but metal comes in many styles with many options.
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I've got a few of the solid Trex composite railings. They sag easily. One of my stair railings is about 6' and has at least a 1" sag in the middle. They're still pretty close to the same color (it fades like vinyl siding does) and in good shape after about 8 years.
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On 11/13/2018 11:34 AM, Puckdropper wrote: ...

Yeah, in midsummer KS sun, it's about like a wet noodle and retains "set" when cools.
Also will burn to the touch in direct sun to point of blistering tender skin...
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If it's supported with balusters every 6" (or whatever the code is), it should be good? I need to replace my deck's decking next year and I don't want to waste money on wood again. I'd love to extend the deck, too, but not sure I'm up for that.

Been sliding down the banister nekkid again, huh? ;-)
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On 11/13/2018 8:42 PM, snipped-for-privacy@notreal.com wrote:

The whole thing can sag; it would need at least one intermediate support over the 6-ft span from what I've observed in town here. If weather not so extreme as SW KS and the like, "maybe" it'd be ok.

The particular case I saw was a toddler...but that too, could be a problem, granted... :)
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I live in NW GA (Atlanta), so the maximum temperature isn't likely worse that what you see. Just more days above ~90F (and more humidity, which is irrelevant in this case).

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snipped-for-privacy@notreal.com wrote in wrote:

If you support that bottom rail or better yet build it out of a material that can support itself, you'll be ok. When that bottom rail starts sagging the whole thing will sag.
There are some Trex sleeves (I haven't looked recently, they may not be available any more) that let you keep the look of composite but have wood inside there for strength.
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On 11/14/2018 9:02 PM, snipped-for-privacy@notreal.com wrote:

OP: I have talked to a contractor and found that that railing must be able to support 200 pounds outward pressure. There are 12 foot lengths (10.5' longest run) of a vinyl made that meet the requirement. It is reinforced by a metal "bar", and will be supported by blocks sitting on the porch floor.
He is getting me a quote. I am sure that it can not be more than what it was going to cost to get it stripped, primed and painted.
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On Wednesday, November 14, 2018 at 9:44:09 PM UTC-5, keith snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net wrote:

Do you you live in an area that gets snow? (If you mentioned it, sorry, I missed it.) If you do, how do you remove the snow, assuming that's an issue?
My deck is 6' off the ground. I used to lift the snow over the railing, then I got smart/lazy/old (not necessarily in that order) and modified one section to do this:
https://i.imgur.com/sipUFVv.jpg
I just took advantage of the mod this morning. If there's a big enough pile, I'll run the snowblower through it to open a path along the front of the deck.
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On 11/18/2018 12:59 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
...

...

...
It was right there...he's in Hotlanta...not _much_ snow.
The facility to be able to not have to go over or around is useful where is snow, however, "trudat!".
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On Sunday, November 18, 2018 at 2:47:10 PM UTC-5, dpb wrote:

Yep, "over" sucks, especially when it's wet and heavy (like yesterday's snow).
"Around" in my case means I'm shoveling onto a landing and then down 9 steps. Shoveling steps sucks almost as much as going over a railing.
If I ever replace the railing or build another deck in a snowy area, snow removal will be part of the design criteria. At a minimum, I'll use a gate of some type that only opens a bottom section of the railing. The ~9" gap I use now is more than enough and I still have a railing to keep me from going over the edge if I lose concentration.
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I think you're missing (the other) Keith's (Nuttle) post. Not sure where he lives.

For light snow, sure. For a foot or three, it's going to be hard to get it under, too. At some point it's easier to go over. ...or wait for spring.
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On Sunday, November 18, 2018 at 6:16:50 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@notreal.com wrote:

Not true. Regardless of the amount of snow, you can always take some off the top and toss it side to side until you have a path to the under-rail opening. Then it's just a matter of knocking the sides down into the path and pushing it through. BTDT lots of times.
I've sometimes had enough snow on the deck that I've opened the sliding door and started shoveling from inside the house, tossing the snow side to side until I've got enough room to get out on the deck and close the door behind me. If I would have tried to step out, I would have knocked snow backwards into the house.
Waiting until spring is not really an option for me. Even if I don't clear the entire deck after a snowfall, I always shovel a path to the grill. ;-)
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On Sun, 18 Nov 2018 17:23:03 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

Until the snow on the outside the railing gets higher than the deck.

Oh, I remember those days. Never again!

I wasn't really serious about waiting. It would have been more like summer. ;-)
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On Sunday, November 18, 2018 at 8:31:45 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@notreal.com wrote:

If that ever happens to me, I'll have more issues than snow on my deck.
As I said earlier, my deck is 6' off the ground. If I ever have that much snow piled up in the back yard, we're screwed!
I spent a year in AK. I remember building snow stairs to get out the buildings. The 1 story buildings would get buried on the windward side. The only way to maintain the entrances on that side was to cut stairs in the snow as it piled up.
Outside of the door by the radio room we had an official weather station like the one shown below. Most of the year we used a step ladder to access the instruments inside it. In the winter, we kept it dug out just enough to be able to open the doors while we knelt in front of it.
https://goo.gl/images/UGV9Go
We used to ski off the roofs of the buildings. If you want to test your balance and agility, buy a pair of seal skin slippers from a local Eskimo. When new, they still have the seal fur on the bottom. Ever notice how easily a seal slides along the snow? Now climb up on the roof and try to ski down the drift in those slippers. It's really hard not to spill your beer.
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On Sun, 18 Nov 2018 20:18:57 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

I've had more than 6' of snow in my back yard any number of times. This deck was only 18" off the ground, though. The snow was deeper than that most winters.

I can imagine. I've seen barns "buried" like that.

"Watch this!" ;-)
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wrote:

I do the same thing for my ice rink. When you get a wet snow--and sometimes the weight of the snow pushes the ice down and makes it wet-- it's almost impossible to lift the shovel.
On my deck, though, I didn't run the railing all the way to the bottom. It just seems to work out better with that 4-6 inch gap.
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On 11/18/2018 5:18 PM, Puckdropper wrote:

Unfortunately no. We live east of Raleigh where 1" of snow is a regional catastrophy.
I was born in northern Indiana and miss the snow, expecially the squeeky variety. I would gladly trade 1 90 Degree 90% day for two zero days, if possible. Then there is the grandson factor, that has to be considered
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wrote:

Watch the spacing. Some fool kid will get his head stuck. I believe code is a 4" spacing on balusters. I'd think the bottom rail to deck would be the same. That's what I did in Vermont (4" spacing from deck to rail) and it really wasn't enough to get the snow under easily. I like the moveable railing idea.
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