Newbie Question, Drawer Lock Router Bits

I have never used a drawer lock router bit, but I want to use lock joints on some drawers I'm making for a couple of projects and I need to pick up an appropriate bit.. But I'm confused by some of the bit specifications. Shank diameter, at least, is obvious. But what are the implications for cutting diameter and cutting height? I'm using plain vanilla 3/4" pine stock. What should I be looking for in a bit?
TIA...
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On 9/14/2017 3:52 PM, Alan Holbrook wrote:

I have been woodworking sing I was about 10. 52 years later, I still don't own nor have I ever used one of those bits. No need actually.
But if you are determined, this might help.
http://www.woodmagazine.com/woodworking-plans/routing/drawer-lock-bit
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Thanks for the reply, but the magazine article doesn't address my question. How do you choose a cutting diameter? One inch? 1 1/2 inches? Two inches? What's the difference? How do you choose a cutting height? Half inch? Three quarter inch? What's the difference?
I'm also always interested in learning from people who've been there. You say there's no need for a lock bit. How do you make lock joints?
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On 9/15/2017 2:02 AM, Alan Holbrook wrote:

The larger the diameter, the deeper it will cut. Settings, you will need to experiment for the sweet spot once you buy the bit. Also the larger bits will tend to cut more smoothly, more mass, BUT you will need to slow down the router speed with larger diameter bits.
I use either Dovetail joints, https://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/4332857960/in/album-72157630857421932/
Box joints, https://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/8615323816/in/album-72157630857421932/
or Rabbet joints reinforced with Domino floating tenons. https://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/albums/72157630857421932
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On 9/15/2017 9:31 AM, Leon wrote:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/5471112571/in/album-72157630857421932/
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On 9/14/2017 4:52 PM, Alan Holbrook wrote:

Professional and my woodworking is an oxymoron, but I have made some nice drawers/boxes using this bit
https://woodworker.com/drawer-lock-bit-14-shank-mssu-921-516.asp?search=router%20bits%20joinery&searchmode=2
The trick is to have two jigs. One basically a miter gauge for your router table to cut on side of the joint and the other a "Miter gauge" so you can cut the other half with the board upright. You have to look at the bits profile to understand what I mean.
Once I got the initial set up and the jigs it goes quite easy.
--
2017: The year we learn to play the great game of Euchre

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Thanks, but again, I'm trying to understand the implications of different cutting diameters and different cutting heights.
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On 9/15/2017 3:06 AM, Alan Holbrook wrote:

I don't understand what you are looking for.
With a bit like this, the diameter is defined by the bits available and you router. The depth is defined by the bit its self. If the depth is wrong the interlocking joint will not work. This would be true for this bit and any other similar bit.
If you are talking about the width of the wood in the joint, there are many articles on determining these width. As I remember the rule is about is thirds, the grove of the joint should be about a third of the width of the piece of wood on one piece and the tongue should be a corresponding third of the other piece
If you have several different routers the larger shaft is better from a safety point of view.
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On Thursday, September 14, 2017 at 3:52:50 PM UTC-5, Alan Holbrook wrote:


Why don't you just use your table saw? Is a whole lot easier and cheaper. I got this from a wood working mag years ago and have no idea which or wha t issue. However, here is the process:
Set your dado stack to 1/4" and raise it to 3/4", with your rip fence 1/4" from the blade. With your OUTSIDE front toward the rip fence, rip your dado . Lower your blade to 3/8" and again with your INSIDE down cut the mating dados in the side pieces. Lower you blade to 1/4" run your front with the INSIDE down and the blade at 1/4". You now have a lock joint and all you need to do is set the fence once and lower the blade twice.
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As always, lots of nice articles and videos on line showing this technique. I'll give that a try. Thanks.
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MLCS has a catalog...don't know if it is online....that shows various lock bits and the stock thickness you would be using. Example-#7849 is a lock mi ter for stock thickness of 1/2 thru 3/4. The chart beside their lock miter bits shows the largest diameter and shank size of the bit. They sell setup blocks as others have recommended...usually made from MDF or maybe HDMW. T hey also sell a joint maker kit with a glue joint, drawer lock, and lock mi ter (set up blocks available). There is only one size for the drawer lock a nd it would be raised or lowered as required by stock thickness. Having sai d this, I bought a Freud set years ago in a woodworking show useless purcha se (one of many) and only used it once to see how to make the joints.
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You want a bit with a cutting height that will let you cut less than stock thickness of the front. The bit diameter is immaterial, larger lets you overlap the side with the front to a greater extent.
I'm with Leon on this though, been fiddling with wood for 74 years and have yet to use a drawer lock bit, too may simple ways to join them; sliding dovetails are super easy for overlapping fronts, sides butted into a rabbet for flush ones (for worriers, pin with dowels).
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I should have said it is imaterial as long as it will let you cut at least as deep as the sides are thick.
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