Furniture moulding

If you have perhaps not yet spent quite enough attention planning out your mouldings, I ran across this book: "Furniture Moulding... to 1820" by Warne (published 1923).
Here is a link: https://archive.org/details/furnituremouldin00warnuoft
If you enjoy English furniture, you may enjoy a quick look!
Bill
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Bill wrote:

Judging by the relative number of replies to this post, versus the Bosch Reaxx one--am I to infer that some of thou would construct an unadorned box, leaving its features of artistic ornamentation to a (mere) afterthought? Admittedly, for reasons of economics, probably 90% of all of ones work must be something like that. But I am merely and sincerely a humble student who has, more than one time, found joy in studying design. I'll pretend that the original post to this thread was not my own. ;)
Bill
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On 2/9/2017 8:47 AM, Bill wrote:

Give it some time Bill, Surely some on will respond by sayyyyy 2021. ;~)
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On 2/9/2017 9:47 AM, Bill wrote:

If a plain box is good enough for cigars, it is good enough for me!
I found it interesting tht there is a formal book on it. Just one of those thing I never thought about. You just go to the lumberyard and pick out some window trim in the style of the day.
We have some interesting buildings in this country, but I marvel at buildings in Europe that are 500 or a 1000 years old that are so elaborate and ornate. To my wife's chagrin, I can sit and admire the details for a long time.
We take it for granted today to buy or make a molding quickly shaped by a machine. Just push this board through. Take away our power tools and then make and install crown molding.
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On Thursday, February 9, 2017 at 9:41:38 AM UTC-6, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

h
Yes to some extent, but there are times when I look for ideas, better than my own. With that, I had thought to comment (see below)....

I wasn't aware of a formal book, either. I like viewing the ideas and con cepts. Thanks, Bill, for posting it.

Yep. Some years ago, I made some astragals and T astragals by hand. Tha t was quite a challenge, for me. I particularly noticed, plates 35 (I thi nk) and several others (plates 76, 77, 78 or there abouts), the similar mol dings between cabinet doors, were similar to astragal moldings. I thought those moldings must be pretty delicate and prone to breaking, easily. Bu t then again, nice cabinets as that may not have been subject to too much a buse.... but 'cepts maybe for liquor cabinets.
Sonny
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"Sonny" wrote in message

If you are interested in this stuff look for "The Gentleman & Cabinet Makers Director" by Thomas Chippendale on Google Books.
I've got a reprint of it that was put out by Dover Press some time ago.
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John Grossbohlin wrote:

Thank you, John. I'll look for the book on Google Book! I have the following book which contains three closely-related books.

It's a heavy volume containing hundreds of wondrous drawings.... I got my copy for $20 from Half-Price Books a few years ago, which I considered a bargain, but I see it can be had now for less than $30. As you may know, one can't buy even a single molding plane blank for $20! ; )
Bill
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"Bill" wrote in message

Yeah... No matter what I do it seems to cost me at least $40-50 every time I leave the house!
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Solution: stay home!
nb
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

I am not directly addressing you, Ed. The development of moldings represents quite a lot thinking (think of architecture--as you did). Think of churches, Greek architecture and many other buildings and things that we wish to "distinguish" to the "very best" of our capabilities. Then one begins to see that they are intrinsically related to the human spirit and that they are a reflection of the people who made them.
The person who wrote the book realized that such a book didn't exist, and considered that is was worth preserving this developed art/knowledge. You can surely find an old piece of furniture or photographs to borrow ideas from--but see it they will let you take measurements! ; )
By sharing a copy of the book, I was not suggesting that it's a book that should be read, I was merely propagating the values you already have that make you able to marvel at at buildings in Europe 500-1000 years old. In the year, 3000, will anyone marvel at those built circa 2000?
The benefits of industrialization come with a cost (do you remember life before "noise"?)
Do you think they might let me work in the cabinetmakers shop at Colonial Williamsburg? : )
Bill

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On 2/9/2017 9:41 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

No kidding! Centuries old buildings still in use today and in the US with so called better new building technology we tend to tear buildings down long before they reach the end of their lives.
The National Cathedral in DC is pretty unique. It took around 100 years to build and was relatively recently completed, IIRC in the 1980's. Craftsmen worked their entire carriers on that building.

I have to wonder how long it took to make moldings with out power tools.
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Leon wrote:

Since most of the wood is removed with a rebate plane or other means, not too long--assuming a "sensible" type of wood.
I'm curious about maximum lengths that they found to be efficient? 4', 8', 12'?
Henry Ford's mansion (completed in 1916) is packed-full of beautiful molding.
Bill

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On 02/09/2017 2:51 PM, Bill wrote: ...

While I don't know for certain whether it is or isn't, that's late enough time frame to have been machine-moulded, not necessarily handmade.
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dpb wrote:

Hmm.. It didn't occur to me that they might have done some of the carving off-site--duh! There's a lot of wood in that place--especially around the staircase. I'll see if I can locate some photos online to jog my memory.
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BILL snipped-for-privacy@whoknows.net says...

The A.S.& J. Gear Co. and the Combination Molding and Planing Machine Co. were having a series of courtroom battles over the patents for the shaper in the 1860s. By the time Henry Ford's mansion was built machine-made moldings would have been commonplace.
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"J. Clarke" wrote in message says...

A few other points of reference:
Pretty much all, if not all, of the Victorian homes used off the shelf moldings, doors, railings, windows, etc.
The Shakers were using a lot of machines in their factories by the later half of the 19th century... bandsaws, jointers, thickness planers, table saws, mortising machines, lathes, etc.
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On 2/9/2017 2:51 PM, Bill wrote:

And I am sure it is all relative, certainly the moldings were a profitable venture.
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I can't say any of the houses I've lived in have been all that spectacular in terms of molding or details. They've been nice houses, sure, well except that one that was held up by 2 2x4s screwed together, but no big loss to see them torn down and rebuilt with modern electrical and insulation.
What I don't understand is why surface-run electrical either looks ugly but is cheap (PVC pipe) or looks ok but is expensive (wiremold). Can't we come up with a nice looking retrofit system that looks decent and is inexpensive?
Puckdropper
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