Bench grinders


I'm considering buying a bench grinder. Now, I realize that there are variable speed grinders (or at least delta makes one) on the market. Is a variable speed unit necessary? or would a heavy duty one speed grinder be a good option as well? Also, What are the pros and cons to having a six or eight inch wheel? One of the main things I'll be using it for is sharpening tools. Also, for fabrication work and whatever else I can think of.
Thanks,
Michael
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grinder
for
Fast versus slow - slow will treat carbon steel better than fast, and who's in a hurry?
Six versus eight is partially slow versus fast in sharpening, partially long versus shorter time between wheel replacement. What it isn't is any big difference in the depth of the hollow grind.
Slow six on my bench. Does carving tools, plane irons and turning tools real well.
Sharpen the lawnmower blades with the disc/belt sander.
Come to think - grass is going to need cutting in a week or so. I'd better do mine. Once a year unless I take rocks....
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I have the Delta 6" variable speed grinder and I like it. !
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Lowell Holmes
"Michael Billings" < snipped-for-privacy@telus.net> wrote in message
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Lowell Holmes wrote:

I had a Delta Shopmaster variable speed 6".
The first example was flat out unusable due to vibrations that no balancing, wheel replacement, etc... could fix. I returned this for another. The second was used for about 10 hours, and the variable speed failed. This unit also vibrated, but much less.
I finally spent 3 times as much on a Baldor. Now I know just what a low quality tool the Delta was.
I'm glad yours is working out, I'm sure some good ones slip out of China. <G>
Barry
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On Thu, 05 May 2005 16:45:12 GMT, the inscrutable "Michael Billings"

Consider a 1" belt sander instead. It's more versatile and provides a much cooler grinding. Belt/disc combos go for $50-90. Add a 600 grit diamond plate + some Scary(tm) paper and Bob's yer uncle.
If you go with a grinder, get a nice, slow-speed Baldor 8-incher with fine wheels. "ONLY" about $550 + fine wheels. <g> http://www.mile-x.com/WoodMetal/Grinders/8100W.htm
Or for less money ($300+), go to www.leevalley.com and get their Mk-II power sharpener.
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Larry Jaques wrote:

Christ, for $29-$39 I can buy a nice 6" and do anything the above overpriced grinders can do, and at that price I can afford to shitcan the entire grinder and replace it several times when the wheels wear out, and STILL not spend anywhere near $500. Grandpa John <-- not a tool collector but a tool user!
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says...

There used to be a 1750rpm unit from one of the ww supply places that was well under $100. I bought one a few years back and it does work better than the standard 3300rpm models.
By now, it may well be over $100 if it's even still available.
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This month (May) the slow speed 8" grinder is on sale for about $75.99 http://www.woodcraft.com/family.aspx?familyidF05
And the Horizontal WetStone grinder is also on sale for $76.49 http://www.woodcraft.com/family.aspx?familyidH66
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I was thinking of getting one of these with the planer blade jig. If it does a decent job it could pay for itself in a couple of years. But does it work well?
I have only had my planer an jointer blades ground "professionaly" by a local guy and I was really unimpressed. Living in a small town, the only alternative is mailing them out which only adds to the cost.

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I'm fortunate enough to have purchased the Makita, and it's a great machine. Last time the comparative merits were discussed, I mentioned the vast difference in shipping weights. I seriously doubt this machine is capable of consistent adjustment based on its lightweight construction.

it
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I just bought one of those woodcraft wetstone sharpeners and used it for the first time today.
I am having a hard time getting the water to come out at a steady rate. Also - the lower tank does not fit well. I had to put tape on it to guide the dripping water into the tank.
It looks like a tube should be used to make sure water falls into the tank. Yet no tube was found in the package.
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Probably why they're "on sale" of course, another blunder far from "quality control" of manufacture. Go to an aqarium store for some soft tubing. How is the blade holder that comes with it? Can you get a deep enough angle? what is the deepest angle you can get? some times up to 35 is needed.
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It looks like about 40 degrees. But I can reverse the tool rest and make it nearly vertical, but not as close to the stone. I didn't get the planer jig.....
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Predictable weakness in the design. When the tank's full, it flows to excess, diminishing as you go. Except for the coarsest stone, it should be OK. For the really porous stuff, hang an IV.

Easily obtained, though unexplained why it shouldn't be there.
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Anyone here have any information on the Boice-Crane "Friction Matic Wet Tool Grinder?"
It's an ~ 8" x 1" dia whetstone which is turned by a rubber roller that is, in turn, pulley driven by an electric motor. All this is mounted in a metal body which will hold water and has a rubber plug to drain it.
Found the thing at a "garage sale" sponsored by the local recycling organization and paid a whole $3.00 for it. Other than being dusty with a touch of surface rust it appears to be in excellent condition. Rubber is solid and the whetstone is in good shape with a flat surface.
Searched like crazy to find out a bit about this and all I could find was a couple of other kindred spirits who were 1) asking for information and 2) complaining that the wheel was shot on theirs.
Would like to know if anyone has one and could tell me what size the drive pulley should be and what they are using for a motor (I presume a 1725 rpm due to the purpose of the machine).
Unlike some others here, I'll accept stupid answers, arrogant remarks, etc. I'm fully capable of hitting the Delete key so USENET READER, please feel free to post.
Thanks to EVERYONE else.
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On Thu, 05 May 2005 15:09:27 -0600, the inscrutable John DeBoo

There is nothing nice about a cheap grinder, John. And you'll be hard pressed to buy a pair of fine _wheels_ for that price.

Yeah, that's why I put the sub-$100 tool first. I played the Baldor <gasp> card as a shocker. ;)
I haven't touched an edge tool to a grinding wheel since I first tried a 1" belt sander a few decades ago.
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Amen to that!
I've got a couple 1X42 belt machines, a 6" wheel bench grinder, and an 8". The wheel grinders are rarely out from their storage space under the bench. But a belt grinder gets used almost every time I'm in the shop. They sand wood, sharpen drill bits, make knives and a whole lot more. It's also very handy to be able sand with the part of the belt not supported by the flat steel platen. Especially for smoothing and polishing irregular shaped metal things.
There's at least one company selling special jigs for sharpening wood lathe chisels on the Rockwell 1X42 belt sander/grinder, as one example of using one for sharpening. There are special belts available for honing, too, as well as a very wide variety of grits.
Doug
spake:

grinder
six
for
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Decide right now if it is going to be a tool grinder or for "fabrication and whatever". If you get a good wheel for sharpening, it sucks for mild steel. If you get the ugly grey wheels (that most all grinders come with) they aren't very good for tools.

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Now if you aren't tied to being satisfied with the trash they sell in stores, you can buy a random surplus two-speed motor with two shafts and have both: a slow speed with fine, good wheel for tool grinding, as
well as a fast speed with trashy cheap wheel for fabrication, rough grinding, etc. Also: think about whether all you want to do is grinding. My grinder has a wheel on one side and a wire brush on the other and I use the wire brush more than the grinder.
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Most slow speed grinders are 1750 RPMs. Garret Wade has one that 1120 RPM., approx $200 when you include two aluminum oxide wheels and a verital tool rest....
http://www.garrettwade.com/jump.jsp?lGen tail&itemID1879&itemType=PRODUCT&iMainCat=0&iSubCat=0&iProductID1879
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