Anyone try the Kreg hinge jig?

On 1/15/2018 1:55 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Just attach a fence to the DP and mark where the center of the hole will be on the fence. Then align the mark on the door to the mark on the fence and that is plenty good enough. No stops needed. I have cut several hundred hinge holes this way.
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On 1/15/18 2:46 PM, Leon wrote:

Last full kitchen hinge replacement job I did, I used similar set-up, but I didn't mark the doors at all. Instead of marking the fence where the hinge goes, you mark the fence for the top/bottom of the doors. They all get spaced the same, so that means you don't have to even mark the doors.
Next time, I may put flip-stops on the fence to make it even more full proof.
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On Monday, January 15, 2018 at 6:25:43 PM UTC-5, -MIKE- wrote:

That's how the Blum hinge boring machines work - they have flip stops. But for odd sized doors or one-off cabinets I would install the plates first. I found that the ones we used sort of came to a point at the center. I'd then push the edge of the door against them in the opening with appropriate shim under the bottom. This left little indents that I'd then mark with a saddle square around to the back, which I'd then line up with the center l ine on the boring machine. Very quick, very accurate. I'm sure not all cu p hinges have this - we used the Blum brand.
JP
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That works too if only putting a lower and upper hinge. For taller doors that require 3 or more hinges marking the center of the hinge location works for me.

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On 1/15/18 11:58 PM, Leon wrote:

You and your tall doors! Ok, so you have to mark the center hinge on those you big baby. :-p
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So, I visited a kinda new woodworker last night and he is doing some pretty serious work, for a novice. He already has a respectable collection of Festool and a collection of larger equipment that is more entry level. Anyway he has the Kreg hinge jig we are talking about! He likes it, but that is all he has ever used to drill hinge holes. Yes he has a DP but has not used it yet for anything. His only dislike about the jig is that it gets clogged up with waste and has to be cleaned out with each hole. I would guess that it will be great when you are in a bind but not the preferred method for several doors especially when you have a DP in the shop. IMHO if you ever have the need to drill a hole for a hinge with no access to a DP you can't miss for such a smash investment. And if you have or get a DP you could use the bit from the jig to drill your holes.
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On 1/16/18 8:38 AM, Leon wrote:

Every time we get further into this discussion I remember more aspects of that last, big replacement job I did. Time is money for us and time adds up very quickly.
I think the biggest time savers for me on that jog was having the vac hose, locked in position the entire time, every time. After more than 50 holes drilled, I had less debris on the floor than if I had drilled one one without a vac.
The other aspect that saved time/money was the fact that I didn't have to measure or mark anything. As fast as I could set the door on the table, I was ready to drill. The actual drilling was the slowest part of the entire process.
The next slowest part of the project was putting those little screws in. Last ceiling fan I installed, the blade attaching screws were connected to the bracket so all you had to do was hold the blade in place and drive the screws. If they could figure a way to do that with these cup hinges that would be awesome.
Anyway, if you are doing dozens of these to make money, I wouldn't ever consider that jig. But like you said, if you're just doing several or are doing it at home during your leisure, then yeah, it's an awesome tool.
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-MIKE-

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On 1/16/2018 10:56 AM, -MIKE- wrote:

Yeah! LOL I need to figure out a way to drill those holes with out my wife holding the DC hose at the drill site.

Yeah, and as you mentioned, stops on the fence speed up production but then I found that I double handled each door because the stops only worked for one end of the door before relocating. I pretty much went straight to using a fixed marking gauge for the top and bottoms of the door and a center line mark on the fence, as I mentioned before. Flip stops for two hinge doors would seem to be the answer, again as you mentioned.

You are in luck! You still have to drill the holes, and probably more precisely but take a look here.
Well actually you would have to seriously step up your game to justify the cost.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YZ376u3bWNo


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On 1/16/18 12:34 PM, Leon wrote:

Wait, surely Festool has it's own recessed hinge boring jig with dust extraction and systainer!! Why don't you own it? :-p

Only $20,000!
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-MIKE-

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On Tuesday, January 16, 2018 at 1:51:31 PM UTC-5, -MIKE- wrote:

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Well, I'm almost there.
The oversized table I made for my DP look very similar to the table for that machine. I'm sure the table is a major part of the cost.
If I bought the machine a la carte I could probably get a discount.
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wrote:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R9j3N48bxQw


Cheap at half the price!
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On Mon, 15 Jan 2018 11:15:15 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

For that many doors, you might want to look at the Rockler jig. I bought one but haven't used it (sorry, no report).
<http://www.rockler.com/jig-it-deluxe-concealed-hinge-drilling-system
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On Monday, January 15, 2018 at 8:43:52 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@notreal.com wrote:

Want to sell it to me for the cost of shipping? ;-)
Seriously, do you have a project that you bought it for?
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On Mon, 15 Jan 2018 18:56:51 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

I bought it to build some cabinets for my shop but I haven't had enough time to even think about it. I have a lot more work to do before I could use the cabinets, even. ...and no time for that, either.
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Thanks Scott and Leon for a look at the actual jig and opinions. I am pass ing on your comments and pics, Scott to my boy.
I got a big charge out of reading the comments.
I understand that he would be better off buying a drill press, a dust colle ctor, and either buying a jig system or taking the time (and learning the s kills/accuracy) to make an adjustable table jig himself. He doesn't have th e money to purchase a dust collection system (and nowhere to put it). Yes, if he spent a little under a $1000, he would be in much better shape.
He doesn't have a drill press. He doesn't have the skills to make a jig. He won't invest in a dust collection system with a chip separator (needed i n this instance) and a cowl of some sort to collect the chips. It is reall y big stuff for him to be putting these hinges on in the first place! No do ubt this will take many more hours than it should, but he will enjoy every single minute being a craftsman and the bragging rights will increase as me asured by the time spent.
He has a drill, a broom and dust pan, since he has to move the jig with eve ry hole anyway I don't think debris removal in his garage will be a problem . He has a couple of small squeeze clamps and can read the rule on the jig well enough (the Kreg instructions, according to some reviews are outstand ing) to make this work on his little 6-8 door project.
Thanks for the good responses!
Robert
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On Wednesday, January 17, 2018 at 6:59:03 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:
...snip...

...snip...
Actually he might.
https://i.imgur.com/d8qYrLF.jpg
The wet-dry vac cost about $50, the plywood for the cabinet cost about $30. The foam was free. (It's an old egg crate mattress pad that I had lying around.) The blue hose is a section from a 30' pool hose that I bought on CL for $25. Toss in a couple of adapters and I've got way less than $150 into the system.
The white box on the right side of the miter saw is the remote that turns on the wet-dry vac. It's velcro'd on so I can take it with me. (Read on)
When I'm not using the miter saw, I swap the shop vac hose to the white PVC adapter on the pool hose. That 1 1/4 hose hanging over the plywood connects to the pool hose on the other side of the shop. I use it at the workbench for my pocket hole jig, ROS, disk sander, etc. as well as general clean-up. (That's why the remote travels with me.)
I have another length of wet-dry vac hose that I attach to the main one for use with my band saw, router table fence, combo sander, etc. (That's why the remote travels with me.)
I set this up about 6 months ago and it still makes me smile. I have a really small shop and keeping it clean keeps it from getting even smaller. It may not look like much, but compared *nothing* or compared to dragging the wet-dry vac around and hooking it up to whatever tool I was using at the time, it's an unbelievably huge improvement.
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On Wednesday, January 17, 2018 at 8:02:35 PM UTC-6, DerbyDad03 wrote:

ally

y


He doesn't have enough equipment to warrant even that. His gear is a mix o f inherited stuff, garage sale stuff, broken stuff, a few of my tools I hav e given him that I think are on their last leg (compressor, leaking air hos e, saw with a bad guard and bearings), or anything he can borrow from me af ter a quick phone call to find out if he can.
He is a different kind of cat. He finished college late in life(54). He f ound that nearly all of his credits earned in his 20s to get him through hi s junior year didn't transfer, so he had the equivalent of 3 (6.5 years act ual) years of schooling at night along with the books/tuition while working . So he has college debt. His divorce (before starting back to school) le ft him penniless, and in debt. He remarried, has had some heart problems, and some way at 59 decided it was time for him to have a kid. So he is pay ing for college, medical bills, his son (now 5) and for schooling to get hi s wife certified for some nursing credentials. He drives old beaters that b reak down constantly. Yet strangely, overall, he is happy. Go figure.
He borrows what he needs from me and has a key to the storage/shop. No big deal for me as the stuff he borrows for minor home repairs I usually have multiples of for use in my business like a drill, sawzall, oscillating tool , sander, brad gun, etc. He isn't checked out on larger tools even though he knows (kind of) how to use some of them. He used to help me from time t o time if I needed the labor and he had the time, but his bad pump put an e nd to that. He can't work for any longer than about 6 hours on his feet an ymore.
BUT... Looking at your setup started my wheels rolling about a setup like t hat to take to the next kitchen I do. I could make a plywood chest that wou ld carry the shop vac and its extensions, but it could double as a miter sa w stand after I got it to the job.
Since I take a lot of stuff in boxes and containers out to my jobs anyway, I always have a hand truck for the bigger jobs. A chest to hold my little 10 gallon van would be the perfect size, and even in plywood I could "truck " it right inside a house or garage and drop the saw on top of it.
Hmmmmm.....
Robert
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On Thursday, January 18, 2018 at 2:17:22 AM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

If he's working wood, he's making saw dust. A vac in a cabinet (vented in the rear) and a couple of extension hoses will improve his efficiency and increase his desire to do more. At least that's how it's working for me.
Build it with him at the same time you are building yours.
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I don't agree - brooms were sufficient for centuries before shop-vacs became were even invented....
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On 1/18/2018 8:47 AM, Scott Lurndal wrote:

And one day with years of experience and investing, my fellow wood workers, you might have a shop vac AND a broom, like me! LOL I can do with out a vac/DC, although I would not want to do so again, but I could probably not do with out a boom.
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