Abrasive wheel on miter saw

I want to put an abrasive metal-cutting wheel on a miter saw, to cut mild steel angle with. Most of this will be 3/32" or 1/8" 1-inch angle. Some say, "sure, no problem!" while others say, "the horror, the horror..." The purpose is to cut a few pieces for some welding projects. For example, cutting some angle steel at 45 degrees to make a table top.
Now, before this goes any further, please do *NOT* tell me to "go buy a chop saw" or "buy a used band saw" or whatever. I'm talking about a miter saw ONLY, OK?
There are supposed to be two main issues with doing this:
First, it overloads the motor. But I don't think this would happen, if you just use very light pressure and take your time and go slow.
Second, the shavings/sparks can damage the fence and/or the motor mechanism (bearings). There may be some truth here. The fence shouldn't be a problem, and I can always cover it with something. Particles? Some suggest removing the vacuum. How about attaching the nozzle of my shop vac just behind the blade and letting it catch them? Or maybe putting a big magnet there, perhaps.
This isn't something I'll be doing often. Maybe once a month I'll make 3 or 4 cuts, at the most, no more. As I said, 99% is going to be cutting 45 degree ends in 1/8" X 1" angle, so I can join them together to make a square corner. That's it.
I use an abrasive blade in my circular saw for straight cuts, but it's hard to cut accurate angles with it. I also have a Porter-Cable Tiger sawzall, I don't think that would work well for this kind of cutting, although I've never tried it.
Please give me a tip here, especially if you've actually done it, and aren't just repeating what you've read or heard. And PLEASE don't tell me to "go buy a chop saw"!!!
Thanks, Ron M.
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snipped-for-privacy@austin.rr.com says...

I wouldn't think of it. Buy a hacksaw. A good Lenox or Starrett tubular high tension frame, and a couple Lenox 24TPI bimetal blades. You can make 4 cuts in 1/8 x 1 angle in half the time it takes to change the blade in the miter saw.
Ned Simmons
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replying to Ned Simmons, Lulu wrote: Hi, I've done it tons of times, for heavier metals, no problem whatsoever and my saw still runs like a new.
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replying to Ned Simmons, Lulu wrote: Hi, I've done it tons of times, for heavier metals, no problem whatsoever and my saw still runs like a new.
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On 4/1/2018 10:44 AM, Lulu wrote: > replying to Ned Simmons, Lulu wrote: > Hi, I've done it tons of times, for heavier metals, no problem > whatsoever and > my saw still runs like a new.
I've done it when needed, but modern mitre saws have lots of plastic parts and you will melt them. I know first hand. LOL.
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wrote:

I have a dedicated 14 inch abrasive chop-saw that I got for nothing with a damaged handle. Handle and switch upgrade from Milwaukee cost me about $15. Does all the cutting I'll need.
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On Sunday, April 1, 2018 at 2:58:11 PM UTC-4, Clare Snyder wrote:

Somewhere I've got a picture of my then 12 YO son cutting a 3/4 steel rod on my old 10" Delta CMS. We were making parts for his Soap Box Derby car. He had already made dozens of cuts, so I was comfortable setting up the picture:
I gave him a long rod so his fingers were no where near the blade. He lowered the disk into the rod just before I turned off the lights in the windowless shop and took a couple of pictures. His face was lit up by the orange glow of the shooting sparks.
I gotta find that picture.
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On 4/1/2018 6:55 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Yes find that picture and share. Sounds way cool!
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Ron,
I was going to tell you to go buy a chop saw, but for some reason I have decided not to ;) Dave Hall
PS - You might want to consider a used bandsaw......
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You beat me to it!!!!
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Ron, The horror! The horror! The only real issue is the RPM difference. A abrasive cutoff saw and more importantly, the abrasive disk is designed for 3200 - 3600 RPM. Most wood miter saws operate from 4000 to 5400 RPM. Abrasive disks do not work well out of their operational range.
As for the project, cutting 0.125" x 1.00" angle with a circular saw (I use a SkillMag77) is a snap and plenty accurate for welding. If you are having problems, the sawzall will also work fine with the correct blade and proper speed. (Slower blade speed than wood)
Dave

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TeamCasa wrote:

In fact they may shatter and do shrapnel damage to many things in the room including. But an interesting idea never the less. Ken
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"the abrasive disk is designed for 3200 - 3600 RPM."
Where are you getting this? Most 7" abrasive wheels have a Max RPM of 6000 to 10,000.
Good advice on here, though.
Ron M.
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Most 12" -14" abrasive wheels are rated for the slower speeds. DAGS If you were going to put a 7" wheel on your miter saw then it could certainally handle the speeds. I go back to my original point, use a Skilsaw, its much safer, faster and cuts accurate enough for welding, if you can weld worth a darn.
Dave

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Assuming that information is correct, the use of an abrasive wheel would be a horrible idea. Over revving abrasive wheels of any kind is a terrible idea. Exploding wheels have a way of killing people. Before choosing to run the setup, it would be a very good idea to verify the speed of the saw to insure the cutoff wheel was run within safe limits. Very nice catch, Dave. That one got past me.
Harold
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Why not buy it precut the way you want it from a local machine shop? They wouldn't charge much for a simple job like this and you have the precision you want and you haven't changed a blade to something that it wasn't designed to do.
Good luck, Rich

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Go buy a chop saw!!!! Harbor freight runs them on sale for $90 or so. :)
I ran masonary blades in my 7-1/2" skill saw as well as some metal cutting blades in both the skill saw and my table saw. Works fine, tears up the bearings from all the crud flying around. I have two cheap Skill saws with loose main shaft bearings in my "do something with or toss" pile. I wouldn't let my good ball bearing Skill saw near an abrasive blade.
One problem you will run into is that use start losing wheel diameter as it wears. On the smaller 7-1/2" saws you run out of working room very quickly. Most of the miter saws are 10" so that is less of a problem. But keep in mind that the chop saws use 14" blades that are MUCH better.
I bought one of the el-cheapo chop saws, switched to some GOOD quality 14" abrsive blades I get at my welding supply place (NOT the HF or HD quality ones!) and get very nice, very quick cuts. I've even munched through a 5" 'I' beam in about 120 seconds
Ron M. wrote:

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I've just spent a few minutes thinking about the rooster tail of sparks that would be flying into my saw, and out of that little DC outlet, and all the plastic parts that saw's got, and I've come to the conclusion that I'm not going to think about it any more. I'm sure it would work but I don't want to experiment with how the saw reacts to it. :-)
Seems like you could cut those pieces with a hacksaw, your tablesaw, or a used bandsaw like Dave says, and then set up a jig for a grinder or sander so you could fine-tune the angle to 45. That's what I'd think about.
No actually I'd think about taking them out to a friend who's got all kinds of metalworking tools but if he wasn't around I'd think about it.
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Go ahead, but first stop and think how much an emergency room visit runs these days. Metal has to be clamped solid before you even think about cutting it. Most wood saws have no useful means of clamping angle iron unless you call those plastic or pot-metal things on the fence clamps. If your blade snags the angle and it flips away from the fence, there will be blood and broken parts. Your saw might be damaged too.
Ron M. wrote:

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How about renting one?
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