2 christmas projects.

http://imgur.com/a/iFR63 Hockey end table.
http://imgur.com/a/cialU Appetizer trays / wine glass holder. Each has a different look to identify your tray/food/wine.
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Jeff

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What would make that hockey end table complete would be a lamp that used a helmet as a shade! With new LED bulbs, heat won't be too much of a problem.
Puckdropper
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Yeah ! - find an old Butch Goring model ..
http://www.mbhockeyhalloffame.ca/asset_library/gallery/sticks/GoringButchHelmets.jpg
John T.
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On Thursday, January 5, 2017 at 11:08:58 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@googlegroups.com wrote:

Helmets are for wimps. Real hockey lamps don't wear shades. ;-)
https://www.reddit.com/r/sports/comments/4p4t8r/old_school_hockey_wasnt_for_wimps/
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This wimp is glad to be unhurt and maybe even alive! That helmet has saved me at least 4 trips to a hospital and left me basically unhurt each time. The last time, I hit a bad spot in the ice and fell over backwards. There was NO way to protect myself.
The game is different than it was in Bobby Hull's day. He made sure of that with the curved stick, and Stan Makita, his teammate made sure of it too! He developed the first usable hockey helmet. Mark Messier's work with developing the M11 helmet took things to the next level. If anyone's still playing with the older helmets, go take a look at the new ones (Bauer owns the M11 line now). They are the most comfortable helmets you'll ever wear!
Puckdropper
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On 1/9/2017 6:13 PM, Puckdropper wrote:

Remember Gary Busey? He did not like helmets either.

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woodchucker wrote:

Not a hockey fan, but I love the appetizer trays. Are the stripes inlaid or painted?
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GW Ross








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On 1/6/2017 11:51 AM, G. Ross wrote:

Not inlaid, and not painted... Full depth, part of the glueup.
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Jeff

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On Thursday, January 5, 2017 at 2:58:02 PM UTC-6, woodchucker wrote:


Very nice.
I like watching hockey, but I don't know all the rules, like (seemingly) di fferent ways to be off sides. I don't know the different ways, so I can' t comprehend the whats or whys about that, when it happens. I don't know ( probably) most of the blue line rules, either. And I don't know the strat egies of the game, except, now and then, when an announcer describes the pr eceding action (replay), leading up to the results.
After reading others' helmet comments, I thought.... Humpf! Real hockey players don't wear helmets. LOL
Sonny
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My helmet has saved me from at least 4 trips to the hospital. Real hockey players wear helmets if they want to keep playing!
The last time wasn't all that long ago. I was turning from skating forwards to backwards (we do it all the time) and I caught a bad spot in the ice. My helmet hit the ice with my head safely protected inside it. There was no time to do anything, it was just hit the bad spot and fall down.
Puckdropper
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On 1/5/2017 2:57 PM, woodchucker wrote:

Jeez! That is cool in an eerie kind of way. ;~)

Very nice! I was thinking about building a dozen or so this year but ran out of time.
Give this a try next year. ;~)
https://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/15897346730/in/dateposted-public/
https://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/16062588371/in/dateposted-public/
Because you are dealing with two different radius arcs for each run you have to remove the exact same amount of material as what you are replacing it with.
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I have seen far less impressive pieces hanging on a wall of an art gallery, for big money.

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OFWW wrote:

Looks like each strip is actually three strips. Is that so?
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On 1/9/2017 6:45 AM, G. Ross wrote:

Actually most, the wider looking ones, are 1/2" and made up of 4, 1/8" wide strips. Sometimes 1 walnut, 2 maple, and another walnut.
The trick is to insure that the strips will add up exactly to the width that you remove.
Typically I use a pattern to guide a 1/2" top bearing flush cut bit to cut about 1/8" deep into the glued up cutting board. I then cut down that grove with the BS. Now the cutting board is two pieces.
With a larger flush cut bit I remove the remainder of the wood that the 1/2" bit started removing. The bearing rides against the 1/8" recess created by the 1/2" bit.
Then sandwich and glue them all, the thin strips and the cutting board pieces, back together. Do this whole procedure for each individual set of stripes.
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Leon wrote:

Wow! That amounts to a real project.
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I would have guessed that you cut, glued, cut... In any case, they're beautiful. I'll show SWMBO the beds but not those. ;)

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On 1/9/17 8:11 AM, Leon wrote:

I've made a few of these after seeing the technique in FWW. I like Leon's idea of the first pattern bit and template, I've always used a guide bushing on the router table and one _must_ keep the board square to the bit (no rotation allowed). Works good for simple curves but errors creep in if one is not careful.
Leon, how long is your pattern bit? The bits I have would require a template at least 3/4" thick.
The latest ones: http://lumberjocks.com/projects/263994
There is a short FWW video of the process (if you can finish it with out barfing from the vertigo 8^)
http://www.finewoodworking.com/how-to/video/the-coolest-cutting-board-ever.aspx
-BR
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On 1/14/2017 9:50 AM, Brewster wrote:

I use a cheap 1/4" shank, 1/2" wide x 1/2" long top bearing flush cut bit for the initial grove. My template was 3/4" MDF, easy to shape and smooth the arcs. Done with a hand held trim router.
After cutting down the middle of the groove with my BS I use a 1"diameter flush trim bit in my router table. the bearing rides along the first grove and cleans up the remaining 5/8" of material.

That is the one I watched to learn how to do this.
A couple of suggestions and the video shows this but you have to be looking for it.
Clamping is challenging. 1. Cut your strips so that they are proud of the top and bottom surface of the cutting board halves by about 1/4", They slip a bit during clamping.
2. Cut a grove in the cauls for the thin strips to pass through during the clamp up.
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On 1/14/17 9:12 AM, Leon wrote:

I see. I tend to use 1/4" hardboard, easier to shape, but I'll now use the hardboard as a template for some 3/4" MDF. Seems way easier than what I've been doing.

Yep, same here. It's kind of eerie to make a "perfect" inlay, then vut it all up again 8^)

Sure do! I tend to make the parts 1-1/2" for a 1" board. All that leveling and cutting takes its toll on thickness.

End cauls too!
I had issues at first with getting everything coated with glue and set into the clamps before things began to set up. I then switched to epoxy. Expensive, but the extended work time was a blessing. Then I started having issues with the epoxy failing (probably from being rigid and shearing due to the slight wood movement). Everything is TB3 now, but with plenty of sloppy squeeze out I manage to get to the clamps in time.
Can you imagine making the strips and doing the leveling at each inlay step without a drum sander?
-BR

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On 1/15/2017 9:33 AM, Brewster wrote:

A small bit like I described above would require you to make a 1/2" deep initial grove if I you use 1/4" pattern material. With a 1/4" shank bit I really prefer to just go about 1/8" deep especially in maple.

LOL yeah, you are successful in gluing in the strips and clamping and planing the proud part of the strips and sanding a bit.......then do that 2 more times on the same board.
Not totally unlike making 3 times as many cutting boards with straight decorative strips.

I do not recall using end cauls, I think I just whacked the ends with a hammer and square cut the ends after the last glue up.

I used TBIII and had my wife assist, that went pretty fast but the epoxy is probably the best solution for open time and strength in the long run.

OOps nix my comment above.... ;~)
Everything is TB3 now, but

LOL well only nix the second half of my comment two responses up.

The drum sander certainly makes it easier but I would imagine a belt sander would suffice.
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