YT: Cheap Photos From an Inkjet printer!?

For those of ye lookin at running costs...
Techmoan's Epson ET 7700 Ecotank review
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sMIl4TA7wYU

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Adrian C

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Pointless really when you can buy refillable cartridges and good quality ink at a fraction of the cost. That Epson would still need to be used regularly or the print head would clog and worse the ink tubes leading to it.
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Yes Epson are not really designed for low volume work as you end up using more ink to keep them going than actually printing. Brian
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On Fri, 08 Jun 2018 18:11:08 +0100, Mark wrote:

Those objections might prove irrelevant to someone planning on saving the costs of wallpapering their house by substituting the expensive wallpaper with their collection of photo prints. :-)
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Not realising they'd be faded away by the end of the week.
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I think ink jet and cheap are two words not often in the same sentence these days and of course use any make you like but not Epsom. the local tip is piled high with cheap epson printers and broken lexmark ones. Brian
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On 16/06/18 16:35, Brian-Gaff wrote:

Horses for courses. Epson printers will give you high quality prints but if you let the heads get blocked they are dead.
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Bernard Peek wrote:

Not true but admittedly it takes a lot more time and effort then most people are prepared for I won a bet a few years ago from a friend who had an Epson SX600 left in a loft for 4years unused its still in use now in our pub and working fine
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On 17/06/2018 00:15, Mark wrote:

I scrapped an Epson. It did good pictures, and wasn't too expensive to run - but if I didn't use it for a month I was back to soaking the heads in meths. Again.
I bought a laser in the end.
Andy
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Our Epson suffered badly from that problem, and I set a weekly reminder on my phone to print a Windows test page every week to stop the ink drying up. That was with genuine Epson cartridges. Since I don't need accurate colour rendition because I don't print photos, I decided to change to cheap clone ink from one of the online cartridge companies. This ink has been much better as regards clogging. However on the occasions when I have printed photos (eg print of a web page or a PDF), the colours have been rather garish - so the choice is accuracy with a tendency to clog up, or lower quality but much less clogging.

For B&W (eg letters) a laser is probably a better buy than an inkjet - no streaky print if it's not been used for a while.
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What is the point of printing letters anymore ?
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For companies that need an "official", signed document. For companies that do not provide an electronic means of correspondence or which only provide a "Contact Us" web form: I find that an email or a written letter is harder to ignore and more likely to elicit a response than a web form which I suspect often gets redirected to /dev/null or else to a junior support sprog who tries to palm you off with platitudes and who utterly fails to address the points you raise.
This will change over time, though the signed letter for financial authorisation may take a long time to be dragged into the 21st century. I have savings with one company who will accept a fax of a signed letter in lieu of it being sent by post, but will not accept an emailed scan of the same letter. Work that one out! They are both images of the same written document, just sent via different technology.
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Havent come across one of those in decades now.
Makes more sense to print those down the library etc on the very rare occasion where you come across one of those now.

Havent come across one of those in much longer.

Which doesn’t need anything printed.

Written letters just get filed in the round filing cabinet under the desk.

Phone calls worked fine for share trading even in the 60s.
Even with buying houses etc, I didn’t need to print anything, the agent did that.

Good reason to dump those dinosaurs.
I did have a couple of banks a few decades ago that dinosaury, but havent come across one that dinosaury for decades now.
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On Tuesday, 19 June 2018 10:58:36 UTC+1, Rod Speed wrote:

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Most solicitors requre such things to be physically signed on paper. For some things such as house deeds signing over ownership they DO NOT acce pt emails or even fax. Selfies of you signing it aren't accdepted either you still need a witness .

Yes plenty of places can print for you now.

ith

.
Depending on the contents the written letter might be as it was with the wi ndrush files and should have been scanned or photographed in some way and s tored.

doesn't mean they do now.

The agent charges for such things or it's included in the costs.

r

f

faxes are more difficult to fake, I wouldn't dump them, I'd rather they are careful than just accepting anyhting as proof. It's not like emails are dufficult to forge.

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Faxes are dead easy to forge if you have the will and the intent. When I had to fax a letter of authority to cash in some of my savings, I didn't use a dedicated fax machine because I don't have one and I wasn't going to make a special journey into town to pay to use the one in library. Instead I used the fax modem in my laptop and "printed" a scan of the signed letter - I faxed exactly the same scan that I would have emailed to them if they'd have accepted emails: identical data sent by a different means.
If I'd had criminal intent I could have pasted a scan of someone else's signature copied from a scan of another unrelated document - easier and less obvious if you do it digitally rather than with scissors and glue :-)
I think companies only accept faxed authorisation on the incorrect assumption that all faxes come from dedicated scan-and-fax devices, without any intermediate computer process that could manipulate the scan.
The situation is even more absurd nowadays. As long as I email my signed document to a financial advisor (whom I've never met, only corresponded with by email) for him to forward to the share-dealing desk, it is accepted. If I send the same scan directly to the dealing desk, it is not. Given that the advisor has never met me or witnessed me sign anything, it's placing a spurious level of trust on the route by which the document has been sent.
Not that I'm complaining. They have my postal address, email address and bank details on file, and would almost certainly refuse to send money to a different account unless I sent them a voided cheque as proof of owning the account.
Having recently moved house, I've had to do a lot of changing of my address on various companies' databases. Most will accept authorisation over the phone (if it's membership of a society or subscription to a magazine rather than anything financial) but some require me to write in. One would only accept the authorisation if I quoted an ID that they posted to me old address and which I then received via a Royal Mail redirection.
As with so many things, it's a trade-off between security to the company and convenience to the punter.
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Unusual to accept any copy of a signature for anything vaguely important. They might well accept a copy of the document with a real signature added, sent by post, though.
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On Tuesday, 19 June 2018 14:05:58 UTC+1, NY wrote:

That's what I thought.

I wouldn;t want to use a company that accepted such things for imporantn purposes, I;d prefer to actually have to post the item or have a signature witnessed.

Yep. so there's only one answer in these cases.

Well I'd assume if you know the fax number and the person you are recieving the fax from and it's something like a solicitors office then that would be be relatively safe as you could get in touch with the origanator of the fax.
But for a number of documents my solicitor emailed me the documents so I could read them and sent the orginals in the post which had to be signed and returned to the office in person. They do NOT accept facsimiles or emails of these.

Maybe they think your financial advisor is a trust worthy source.

That's your problem then or the way you want it done.

I was asked what bank account I wanted money transfered to, I assume they trust the person to give them the correct account details.

Good for them I'd prefer that.

It's a bit like Aples two step authentication then a good idea I'd have thought. How happy would you be if I emailed your bank telling them that you chnaged bank account details and all you money should now be transfered into my account.

Yep, and I prefer security.
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I did relatively recently have one bank, Citicorp, when I had managed to have my account locked due to their stupidity, demand that I write them a physical letter before they would unlock the account.
Just a week or so ago another which had also locked my account, said that if I couldn’t answer the security questions over the phone call successfully, I would have to go in to the physical branch. But I did get all but one question right. The one I didn’t was the account number. That banks has lots of different numbers, different one for the account itself, for the debit card and also another security number and it wasn’t at all clear which number they were asking for.
I now have an extra field in my database with the name they use for a particular number which should fix that problem if they don’t start calling a particular number by a different name later, which is always possible.
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Yes, but they are the ones who printed what gets signed, not the signer. So while it certainly makes sense for the solicitor to have a laser printer that they use to print what gets signed, no need for the signer to have one.
And most of what gets signed on a piece of paper now needs a proper witness etc, so you can't even claim that its convenient to have a printer at home so you can print what arrives electronically and post it back now.
For the very very few items where that is still needed, it makes more sense to print it down the library etc instead of having a laser printer at home for the very very few occasions where you do need to do that now.

Sure, but in that case it’s the solicitor that prints it, not the signer.

So it makes sense for the solicitor to print it, not the signer.

If they do that, they will keep the emails they receive too.

But they don’t even now require a snailmail letter.

Still means that there is no need for the buyer to print anything, the agent does that.
Or in our case, the solicitor actually shows up at the auction in person with the printed paperwork which the buyer signs once they have won at the auction.
That’s what happened with the one I bought and what happened at the auction I attended last Saturday too.

Bullshit. Particularly when few have a fax anymore so have to take it to somewhere that still has a fax to send it.

More fool you.

No difficulty forging what gets faxed either.

In fact I did the last one by phone. Got them to setup and automatic payment in full of the credit card balance every month from another bank which pays a better interest rate on my substantial cash deposits. Plenty let you do that with online forms now too.
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On Tuesday, 19 June 2018 19:05:24 UTC+1, Rod Speed wrote:

Which is why they send it through the post yes, that way they can charge fo r it too. Plus if the person signing the paper can print it they could also change it.

er

ne.
No need for a signer to own or have a pen either. There;s no reason for the signer to wear clothes either but that isnlt the point.

yes I know.

Depending what it is, but most might prefer to print out a legal document t han read it on their phone. I do and I highlighted any errors, and emailed the solicitor back expalining the any errors.

So it;s always been that way even with typewriters for some they were a worthwhile addition to their hone for others they were a waste of space.

signer.
Yes so. Even if the solicitor prints it they ahve to send it too, whereas I can print it and read it before it arrives.
Apple don't send you their T&Cs as a printed document but you have to click to accept it, I doubt you've read those 20k odd words everytime up update.

Yes and that is what they do, what's your point, if you have one.

.
Emails didn't exist when the windrush arrived in the UK which arrived at Ti lbury Docks, Essex, on 22 June 1948. But they can't seemd to find the scanned versions if they did scan them.

Irrelevent, as the buyer might want to print our things for themseles anywa y.

Yep, so hopefully the buyer has checked what the solicitors brings to the a uction. The person buying at auction might want to print out the catalogue or just the pages they are interested in.
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