Wireless lights

I was looking at this (Amazon.com product link shortened)
It seems to be a ceiling light with a switch that controls it wirelessly, rather than with a cable looped in. Why isn't that used more? I'm looking at some major electrical rewiring, and this would save an awful lot of chasing out the walls to drop the cables down to the light switch. Compared to the cost of chasing, making good, and redecs, this is only £15.
What am I missing? Why isn't this done routinely, even for new-builds?
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(Amazon.com product link shortened)

I guess because at some point down the line, like wireless doorbells, when it stops working you then have the aggro of not knowing whether it's the bell/bulb or the battery in the transmitter.
Having said that, I retro-fitted two switches like this to save a hell of a lot of aggro when I wanted to reposition the switches and they'd worked perfectly since. I would certainly use something like this again in similar circumstances.
Tim
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wrote:

You want to put a battery in every light switch in a new build?
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Graham.

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On 06/03/2013 09:52, Graham. wrote:

They don't have to have batteries. There are radio operated switches that use tiny amounts of power and can self charge from changes in room temperature, light, vibration or simply from the mechanical action of pressing the switch. For example here is a mechanical one:
http://www.adhocelectronics.com/Products/Wireless-Lighting-Control
SteveW
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149 dollars - so you can make that pounds for the UK. Think I'm happy with cable. The OP was hoping to save money.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On 06/03/2013 23:09, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

It was only an example. I'm sure there are others. Even at $149 or £149, it's cheaper than redecorating a whole room simply to channel a wall for new cable.
SteveW
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Then stick a conduit in for next time - and still save money.
How many decide to re-wire after decorating?
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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we might not, but a higher authority might require it..
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From KT24

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But then take the opportunity to change the decor?
How many SWMBO actually care much about where a light switch is anyway? ;-)
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

An awful lot of people. Usually new homeowners.
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Adam



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On 06/03/2013 23:52, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

We certainly have two lights where a wireless switch would have been useful.
I re-wired when I moved in. When I married and SWMBO moved in, we re-decorated.
We have since bought a wider bed, which won't fit in the same position as the old one, so we can no longer turn the light on and off from in bed - the second switch is actually behind the wardrobes and the bed is against another wall. The room does not need decorating and will only be due a coat of emulsion then.
We have also re-arranged the kitchen. The cooker was originally installed where the gas connection was and later moved to an outside wall so that a hood could be fitted. This meant moving the fridge, covering a lightswitch. In this case we struggled on for a while as we were due to redecorate the kitchen and then moved the switch and reversed the door opening.
SteveW
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It's not just a simple redec, is it? You have to channel out the wall, with all the mess that entails. Then replaster that bit, *assuming* the rest of the plaster stays up. Big if! Then strip and reline as necessary. The redecs after that are the smallest bit.
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wrote:

Because builders fit the cheapest kit they can buy.

The ones sold by Amazon do.
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On Wednesday 06 March 2013 09:33 GB wrote in uk.d-i-y:

Ceiling/dp/B009E6D1TI/ref=pd_sim_sbs_light_3

I'm not totally convinced of the reliability and battery related hassle over "proper" fixed wiring. However, I'm giving it serious thought for outside lights - driveway and garden and maybe pond. Then those become a simple radial circuit for power (which is enough digging as it is) with some radio switches indoors. Good candidate for a pocket remote and one in the car too.
The battery hassle there is limited to probably a couple of banks (front and rear doorways) and if it goes wrong, your toilet for example is not blacked out!
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On 06/03/2013 10:00, Tim Watts wrote:

You can avoid the battery issues:
http://www.enocean-alliance.org/en/products/
What you cannot avoid, it seems, are the cost of purchase issues.
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Rod

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wrote:

I looked at the MK Echo version last year when thinking about some wireless controls and decided that whilst it would probably be the best option in the longer term I would like to try out something less expensive to start with.
I went for some LightwaveRF kit, a couple of in-line relays to site in the loft and a small hand held remote controller and a wall switch in the living area.
The current arrangement controls a set of halogen LV downlights so that all of them or a single light is on. Relatively simple to setup and in use since December last year with no problems as yet.
Now thinking of some more applications including some more lighting and programmed TRVs in a couple of rooms.
--
rbel

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On 06/03/2013 10:00, Tim Watts wrote:

I'm extrapolating from our wireless bell push, which has lasted on its original battery for around 10 years. That gets pushed on average 3 or 4 times a day, I guess. Our kitchen light switch probably gets toggled 10 times as often, but most others in the house probably the same as the door bell. So, I'm not sure the battery hassle really would be, IYSWIM.
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(Amazon.com product link shortened) > It seems to be a ceiling light with a switch that controls it

Years of experience of wireless links of all types says you only use them where a cable option isn't practical.
It's also a vast number of batteries to need regular replacement in the average house.
I also doubt it can do two way and multi-way switching for halls, etc.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On 06/03/2013 10:30, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

I'd have thought two- and multi-way switching would actually provide the greatest benefit in terms of less and simpler wiring.
But agreed about batteries - if the kit needs them.
--
Rod

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On Wed, 06 Mar 2013 10:30:08 +0000 (GMT), "Dave Plowman (News)"

I have a "Celect" wireless C.H programmer and on a couple of occasions the final "stop calling for heat" event of the day has not been received, and the heating as stayed on all night.
You would think that it would repeat the command at intervals but it doesn't seem to.
The biggest joke are wireless PIR sensors for a burglar alarm.
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