Water-based Paint

Have been doing a bit of interior painting recently - where I have been using Joncryl primer/undercoat and Johnstone's acrylic sheen. Because I have been switching between the two, I have repeatedly washed the brush out after doing one or two door sides. (With oil-based I'd have used two brushes and not cleaned fully till the end. But it is so easy to wash out the water-based...)
The washing out and thereby not allowing any significant accumulation of drying paint to occur made life so much nicer. Previous usage of water-based I have tended to keep going, going, going and getting a slowly-drying ridge of paint towards the top of the brush - but never again.
And the paint finish has been as good as any I have ever achieved. I like this new era of water-based...
--
Rod

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Despite appearing to be a really bad gimmick, these do actually work very well:
http://www.handysolutionsuk.com/Dandy%20Paint%20Brush%20and%20Paint%20Roller%20Cleaners.htm
Bugger all use with a pad, though.
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On 22/10/2012 22:18, mike wrote: <>

http://www.handysolutionsuk.com/Dandy%20Paint%20Brush%20and%20Paint%20Roller%20Cleaners.htm
That was quite the worst quality video I have seen in, umm, ages. :-)
Have thought many times of getting one - but it only took a very little effort to clean my brush. So will probably skip it unless/until I need to use oil-based again - if that ever occurs.
--
Rod

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On 22/10/2012 21:39, polygonum wrote:

The problems with water based have been a) retarding the drying to allow the paint to form a uniform film and b) imparting toughness into a film that will perform at low temperatures. I don't think there will ever be a good gloss, but undercoat and satin seem to work well enough. Not sure about high traffic skirting etc though. There are superb acrylic finishes (these days on most cars I would think) but they need a precisely controlled temperature during application and drying. Not easy given how the temperature drops during spraying. Maybe they dip cars now?
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On 23/10/2012 08:11, stuart noble wrote:

They do not dip top coats - might do so for some bottom layer(s). And they most certainly do not dip on refinish! (E.g. repair after accident.)
Many refinish works never use anything but some form of acrylic/water-based and do not smell much of any solvent.
--
Rod

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On Tuesday, October 23, 2012 8:11:10 AM UTC+1, stuart noble wrote:

From a user's point of view - as far as I am concerned the main problem with water based paints has been with the water causing raised grain on woodwork. Obviously this isn't a problem if you're not painting wood, or there are no exposed patches of bare wood, but I've had problems with water based primers. It's frustrating when you've sanded everything down to a nice smooth finish and then someone slaps water based paint on and you have to do it all again... On the other hand looking at the cheap panelled doors made with fake raised grain on the hardboard facings - maybe that's what the suppliers think people want?
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On 23/10/2012 15:49, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Completely agree that they can raise the grain. But, in that sense luckily for me, most of my painting is re-decorating where the substrate is already pretty well covered.
--
Rod

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On 23/10/2012 17:47, polygonum wrote:

IME they only raise the grain on badly prepared timber
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On 10/23/2012 1:02 PM, stuart noble wrote:

I brush a thin coat of shellac on raw wood, before using water-based paint.
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On Tuesday, October 23, 2012 6:14:27 PM UTC+1, S Viemeister wrote:

That's what I intended to do - unfortunately someone else decided to be 'helpful' and primed it before I had the chance...
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On 23/10/2012 17:47, polygonum wrote:

I find that water-based paint is fine on wooden door frames and skirtings, etc. However, what it's *not* fine on is MDF window cills if they're ever likely to get wet. When the paint is thoroughly dry it will still let water through - unlike oil-based paint - and this will bring the MDF up in a nasty rash.
--
Cheers,
Roger
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wrote:

I wouldn't use MDF for window cills again. They all turned into weetabix, even using oil-based paint.
--
(\__/) M.
(='.'=) If a man stands in a forest and no woman is around
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OK for the last 17 years here. Oil based paint, double glazed and radiators under the windows.
Good point about water based porosity though.
--
Tim Lamb

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wrote:

I think you were using chipboard. MDF delaminates; it's more like sheets of Shreddies.
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On Wed, 24 Oct 2012 11:14:29 -0700 (PDT), Weatherlawyer

It was sold as MDF.
--
(\__/) M.
(='.'=) If a man stands in a forest and no woman is around
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