TV audio improvement for a slightly deaf person

I have a friend who struggles to hear the telly. She is not all that deaf but has a deaf aid. At present she has a newish flatscreen telly with very poor sound quality. I'm wondering what I can do for her. She tried a gadget she got from RNID that is supposed to feed the TV sound into the hearing aid when it is set to T, but it wasn't very successful. She doesn't want to wear headphones. I'm wondering about a sound bar or computer speakers or whatever. Ideas anyone?
Bill
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On 04/09/2018 14:41, Bill Wright wrote:

www.hearingloss.org.uk is one place to visit.
I suspect this is the RNID anyway and they sell hearing amplifiers and other hearing-related goodies.
Unless she lives in a detached property, a sound bar, AV amp or whatever at excessive loudness is just going to upset the neighbours.
OTOH if she has been watching some recent BBC1 series where the lead actor had decided that whispering huskily is the cool way to act, then it's the program at fault, and not her hearing.
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On 04/09/2018 14:59, Andrew wrote:

On most TVs the built-in speakers are on the back facing away from the viewer. A sound bar faces the right way plus it's probably miles better quality, so it doesn't necessarily have to be louder to help.
These days, for foreign language programmes (ie anything recorded in the USA), I use subtitles.
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wrote:

Mum (88) doesn't watch much TV, mainly because she can't hear it ... or can't hear it completely / easily and doesn't want to upset her nexdoor neighbours by having the TV very loud.
So, when we go round there and I'm watching TV whilst the Mrs plays Rummikub with her, if they finish and Mum ends up watching some TV, I turn the subtitles on and I notice how much more 'involved' she is (to the point where she seems quite hooked on the program).
What she doesn't seem to do is turn the TV on herself and that's a shame as I know there are tings she would (has, when I've been there) actually enjoy (like gardening programs or the news etc).
I'll have to check that she an turn the TV on, use the EPG and can change the source if it comes up on the DVD / NowTV.
We have some PC external speakers on there all the time (we often watch films when we are round there house-sitting) but I'm not sure if they offer much clearer audio (but better bass and image width).
I have a spare soundbar so might take that round there and see how it works.
Cheers, T i m
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I hate subtitles with a passion, they stop you watching the video properly and I play Freecell Pro when 'watching' any video.
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On 4 Sep 2018, GB wrote

This is the sort of system I use myself. It allows me to set the volume in the earphones as loud as I like without affecting the volume from the loudspeakers. They are terrific. I bought mine at Lidl’s for about £30 a year or so ago. I find worn in the ear deaf aids quite unsuitable for listening to TV or to music. petefj
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On 5 Sep 2018, pete wrote

https://www.hearingdirect.com/geemarc-cl7310-wireless-tv-listener.html
I forgot to add the follow up url, apologies petefj
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Yes, I don't think the ones with microphones are much good. The problem is it really needs to be right up to the speaker but on these modern tellies they are at the back. I suspect a pair of very good computer speakers and mute the internal sound and maybe a Y splitter on its input to put the audio into the loop might be better, but I'm not up to speed how these cope with stereo. Often this kind of tech has not moved with the times since about 1970. Brian
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On 04/09/2018 17:18, Brian Gaff wrote:

Surely they never use microphones? I would have thought they either use audio via wire or optical fibre, or Bluetooth (with possible problems with pairing and/or sync).

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Max Demian

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On 04/09/2018 14:59, Andrew wrote:

She does

I don't think she needs much more volume, just an improvement in sound quality.

That is a factor, for sure.
Bill
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On Wednesday, 5 September 2018 00:21:42 UTC+1, Bill Wright wrote:

AGC or VOGAD needed
NT
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On 05/09/2018 00:21, Bill Wright wrote:

OK so you have some degrees of freedom to play with.

This is unclear. She must have lost quite a lot of hearing if she can't follow the TV with it louder than normal and a hearing aid. Her best bet might be to go on a lip reading course like my dad did.
The T setting as far as I can tell (apart from in banks and other very background noise intensive environments) is a waste of time on the modern digital filtered hearing aids.
Subtitles will help a lot but not all channels offer them.
Her hearing is probably badly frequency limited so "good" sound quality for her is almost certainly going to sound like a bad phone line to you. You want speakers and frequency response optimised for her hearing ideally.
As a quick test jerry rig a pair of PC speakers either side of her favourite chair might be worth a try but don't expect miracles. Even better if you can run the sound through a PC with a digital filtering program to let you adjust the response until she finds speech clear.
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Martin Brown
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just been using it at a lecture - much clearer than straight listening.

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from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
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On 05/09/2018 08:16, Martin Brown wrote:

+1
Audacity is a very powerful free program and has an equalisation tool. Alternatively you could use GarageBand, if you have a Mac.
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On 05/09/2018 17:15, newshound wrote:

As I am now reliant on hearing aids, I have experimented with this and come up with the following:
I tried plugging a small bluetooth tx into the tv powered from its USB socket (Sony Bravia tv), but even those that claim low latency were useless as there was still an annoying delay.
I now have a small stereo FM tx powered in the same way with no audio delay(!), which is received on the FM receiver on my old LG smartphone (3 years old). The output goes to the audio line input of my hearing aid remote control which can adjust levels independently.
The smartphone has equalisation settings, but I have an equaliser app - of which there are many - and this gives fairly reasonable sound. For music the hearing aids are discarded and replaced with Sennheiser headphones.
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Chris

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Are the "tone" controls set to suit her hearing? Does she need the Treble turned up and the Bass down? ?Many people apply the wrong instinct on this and turn up the Bass
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On 06/09/18 10:00, DerbyBorn wrote:

As I pointed out before hearing aids should be providing the optimum correction for this already. The only thing left to correct would be the frequency response of the TV itself.
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wrote:

Some TVs have a "Equaliser" function in the Sound/Audio part of the Menu.
If her TV has that you could experiment by increasing and decreasing the volumes of various frequencies.
My TVs have an Equaliser function with separate volume controls for 100Hz, 300Hz, 1kHz, 3kHz and 10kHz.
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Peter Duncanson
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On 04/09/2018 15:01, Peter Duncanson wrote:

That's an idea. I'll check up on the telly.
Bill
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On Tuesday, 4 September 2018 14:41:54 UTC+1, Bill Wright wrote:

One alternative to headphones is a speaker very close to the listener's head.
NT
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