TT Earth Electrode indoors?

Is there any reason not to have an earth rod indoors? TT system.
I've got 2 earth rods outdoors, can I keep them and add a third indoors so there's less resistance?
http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php/TT_Earthing
[george]
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 25 Dec 2017 04:20:13 -0800, George Miles wrote:

What is your earth rod resistance now? Adding an extra rod is not guaranteed to lower the total resistance. If you are currently getting 10 ohms than adding another rod will not really help, however if you have 150ohms or so, then an extra, or deeper rod may well help.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 25 Dec 2017 07:22:36 -0600, Alan wrote:

Should really be earth loop *impedance* tested at 50Hz.
--
This message may be freely reproduced without limit or charge only via
the Usenet protocol. Reproduction in whole or part through other
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 25 Dec 2017 13:56:37 -0000 (UTC), Cursitor Doom
viable and meaningful comprehension...

True, but I doubt the inductive and capacitive reactance components are too significant. I'm willing to learn though.
--

Graham.
%Profound_observation%
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 27/12/2017 15:52, Graham. wrote:

AC is preferred for earth electrode testing since it avoids any electrolytic effects on the electrode when using DC. (you can test with DC, but its good to take a few readings reversing the polarity for each test.
--
Cheers,

John.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Also of course when dealing with such low impedance systems the way you connect them together will matter as well. some very thick copper? Brian
--
----- -
This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I don't think domestic earth systems are as low impedance as one might think. Someone said between 10ohms and 150ohms, and these are the sort of figures attainable without burying huge amounts of copper. Conductor diameter is more governed by possible fault currents than anything else. Also mechanical strength may be relevant if exposed. You won't go far wrong in a house using 16mm^2 and that may be unnecessarily big.
There are, of course, regulations you can look up if necessary. But huge bus bars are probably not useful.
--

Roger Hayter

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 25/12/2017 12:20, George Miles wrote:

Do you live in a mud hut with an earth floor?
--
Max Demian

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The Earth Impedance has been tested and is OK, but the plastic casing covering the earth wires clipped to the wall has been broken, it's where it can get knocked by wheelbarrows etc, it would be so much neater to not have wires clipped to outside walls but to have the earth rod under the consumer unit indoors.
The floor is flagstones on earth, (its a Victorian house) so I should be able to put an earth rod indoors even if it means drilling through some footing i hope
[George]
On Monday, December 25, 2017 at 12:20:16 PM UTC, George Miles wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 25/12/2017 12:20, George Miles wrote:

No reason why not, although you may find it harder to get a low impedance in what will likely be drier soil.
--
Cheers,

John.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 25/12/2017 15:09, John Rumm wrote:

So, not a problem for those with 'internal wells' that are now 'features'.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 25/12/2017 16:43, Andrew wrote:

I feel I have missed something?
--
Cheers,

John.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 25/12/2017 18:18, John Rumm wrote:

Access for inspection and testing? You might not want an earth pit [*] visible FVSO "indoors".
[*] e.g.https://www.screwfix.com/p/plastic-inspection-earth-pit/59527#_=p
--
Andy

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 25/12/2017 22:08, Andy Wade wrote:

ISTM if you have a slab floor, having one you can lift for access to your inspection pit[1] would not be unreasonable.
[1] or more typical terminal cover:
https://www.tlc-direct.co.uk/Products/MTETC.html
--
Cheers,

John.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I was momentarily surprised that your URL gave the stock position at my local Screwfix; until I remembered the miracle of cookies.
--

Roger Hayter

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 25/12/2017 22:08, Andy Wade wrote:

Well I was thinking of those programs like Homes Under the hammer, which was one situation where a house bought at auction turned out to have an old well inside the property.
It was dry-ish but with some nice ferns growing so the new owners installed some wall-washer lights and put an inch thick slab of glass over it as part of their new kitchen floor. It looked quite interesting, but I would have thought at a wine store would have been a better use for it.
Being not-dry, I presume they could have stuck their TT earth rod down there at the bottom ?.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 26 Dec 2017 14:06:01 +0000, Andrew

Ooh!
A nice earth (RF)
Avpx
--
'What good is a candle at noonday?'
(Sourcery)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@mybtinternet.com says...

Reminds me of a house I visited in Didcot a year or two ago.
The well is quite deep and still has water at the bottom!
--

Terry

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
replying to George Miles, Iggy wrote: Yes, you bring unregulated and unwanted electricity into the building and you may SEVERELY worsen your earthing. Close lightning strikes energize the earth and would energize your earth rod. Poor earthing conditions are dry soil, so being under the building's footprint could mean little to no earthing actually happens. The 3rd rod should NOT be a replacement of the existing 2 and MUST only be added to the existing 2 by a jumper conductor...ONLY IF determined to be needed or beneficial.

This addition or by driving your existing rods deeper, is the ONLY way to reduce your resistance. But, what is your current resistance? If you're already at very low resistance, then you likely can't make it any better because you're down to the conductor's own resistance. Don't do anything unless and until you know what your resistance is. More rods IS NOT better and WILL only extend your reach to pick up static electricity, fallen power-line or lightning energy...a deeper single rod is factually best.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Citation please
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.