Tile laminate layout/cutting question

I'm about to start fitting a kitchen, and shortly afterwards a new floor. We've had 3 rooms knocked into one long room and we wanted uniform flooring so we've gone for tile effect laminate (yes I know some of you will hate that but that's not the question...) The question is where to start? Either at the complicated end (under the side units and peninsular units), or the easy end on nice straight walls?
I've uploaded a sketch here:
http://img388.imageshack.us/my.php?image=kitchenlayoutjg2.png
Regarding the flooring, it's travertine style from B&Q. This is in 120cm long "planks" split into two long tiles, 60cm long each. Do I have to overlap these lengthways like you would normal laminate/ wood?
If so, presumably I need a very thin saw cut to get the tiles looking good when put together. What sort of saw do I need to get? Laminate blade or metal blade in jigsaw?
Thanks Painters10
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I'd be tempted to start at the easy end first to ensure that the whole run is started off square. That said, if you need to lay boards under some units, then you would probably need to do these first since it will be more difficult to click the boards in place. i.e. I'd click a few runs together then push them under the units and contine into the room working towards the straight wall.
You don't need to worry about staggering the boards with tile effect laminate - the joins are invisible because of the recessed "grout lines" on the boards.
Mark.
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wrote:

I'd be tempted to start at the easy end first to ensure that the whole run is started off square. That said, if you need to lay boards under some units, then you would probably need to do these first since it will be more difficult to click the boards in place. i.e. I'd click a few runs together then push them under the units and contine into the room working towards the straight wall.
You don't need to worry about staggering the boards with tile effect laminate - the joins are invisible because of the recessed "grout lines" on the boards.
Mark.
I've laid some of this myself and I wouldn't go so far as to say that the joins are invisible. The quality does vary from one pack to the next - maybe only slightly - but it does vary and you can see the joins if you look closely, especially if you laid it. Franko.
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I did something similar and started from the easy (non-kitchen unit) end - if you start from this end then it's easier to use wedges or similar against the wall. It can be a pain stopping the whole lot moving around until you get a decent amount down and doing this against the legs of units will be a real pain.

Not sure I follow this. The only cuts you'll make are at the end of the rows and then use the offcut to start the next row (if it's long enough).
Definately offset the joints - it'll be a lot weaker if you don't. The joints do run in the "grout" lines but I wouldn't say they are invisible. Before laying each plank blow the dust and crap out from the joints to make sure the joint is as tight as it can be.
Darren
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I'm not sure that which end you start at really matters, so I would probably start at the easy end as that's where you'll see more of the floor and you want to get that right, rather than have it exaggerating any discrepancies that start at the kitchen end. I'm sure you'll find a way of attaching the bits that are partially under the units. Undoubtedly there will be purists along who will tell you that the boards should run lengthways, but that might be looking for trouble in a space this size and shape.
Wherever you start, of course, you'll find that nothing is square but, sometimes, making the floor square can show up the out-of-squareness of the room even more.
Not sure what you mean about the cutting: I would definitely stagger the joints, for integrity of the whole floor, but the only cuts you need to make for this are at the ends of every other run and these will be hidden under skirting or quadrant, so they don't have to be too special.
I use a regular fine wood blade in the jigsaw (no doubt a laminate blade would be better) and cut from the back so the saw pulls against the decorative face. The only cuts that should show are those around door frames though.
Good luck (!)
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