Super warm gloves for building

Can anyone recommend a thin but warm pair of work gloves. Water proofness is not a requirement. Being able to wield a screwdriver and spanner is.
The jobs are gutter hanging and window fitting in December :-o
Cheers,
Tim
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On 27/10/12 19:32, Tim Watts wrote:

try Nomex kitchen gloves.
Not good if wet or in strong wind, but very much the thing for touching cold or hot stuff
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On 27/10/2012 19:32, Tim Watts wrote:

Found 3M Thinsulate can be quite good - but lots of different products so you need a bit more research/advice.
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On 27/10/2012 19:32, Tim Watts wrote:

I really like this type
http://www.screwfix.com/p/general-handling-builders-gloves/74540
Available all over the place, just picked up the screwfix link for simplicity.
They give good physical protection while still letting you do fairly delicate stuff. I've not particularly used them for warmth, but I expect they would be fairly effective. They are a bit stretchy so the right size is very close fitting, in contrast to thinsulate or traditional rigger gloves.
They are quite tough enough for handling blocks and splintery woodwork or plywood.
Used them this morning (ice on the car) while jacking up a car, handling various wooden chocks and metal axle stands with concrete block "backup".
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On 27/10/2012 19:59, newshound wrote:

I really like gloves like that for general protection but they have not seemed to be very good in frosty weather - or am I going soft? And they are not very much protection against sharp saw blades... Ow
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Tim Watts wrote:

They won't be on for longer than 5 minutes at a time - it's practically impossible to hold screws, nuts, bolts etc with gloves on
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On 27/10/2012 20:34, Phil L wrote:

Actually I find you *can* fit screws, nuts, and bolts with the gloves I suggested. They are not *quite* delicate enough to remove a single screw easily from a box until you get to about 2 inch No 8's.
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newshound wrote:

Cheers,
I'll give them a try - can always cut the tips off the thumb and first finger if needs be.
Looking at how the gutter is fitted now, it's probably going to be coachscrews into piloted holes - and 50% of the job will be marking out and pilot drilling.
The fiddly bit that the gloves may well impede will be the wibbly little bolts on the joints. Glad all this is at 7' off the ground :)
Tim
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On 27/10/2012 21:29, Tim Watts wrote:

Magnetic bit holder solves most of the problem of getting them out of the box ;-)
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Phil L wrote:

Gloves are mandatory on many building sites. You can't take them off. You just have to learn to manage.
Bill
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You take them off once you know who the police are. The big problem is gloves can help fingers to freeze.
If you want cold protection wear mittens. Apparently the Canadians never went bear handed. It was impossible not to use gloves in winter and by the thaw your skin was too soft to work without them.
At least with mittens you can easily slip them back on. Gloves take a minute at least.
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On 10/28/2012 2:13 AM, Weatherlawyer wrote:

The gloves with no fingertips, but with an attached mitten flap, can be useful. The flap flips back out of the way, and can quickly be pulled down over the fingertips.
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On 27/10/2012 19:32, Tim Watts wrote:

Something like:
http://www.screwfix.com/p/general-handling-builders-gloves/74540
give good grip and leaves you with a fair amount of fine control. They are not super insulated, but they keep the wind off and are way better than nothing.
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John.

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Those ones are very good, been using them quite a bit recently and a good compromise between protection and "feel" they are too:)...
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On Saturday, 27 October 2012 19:32:47 UTC+1, Tim Watts wrote:

Thin blue vinyl "surgical" gloves, with orange rubbery knit over them. There's a surprising warmth to be had from just thin rubber gloves, compared to bare skin.
Best of all though is good circulation. Some people (fortunately myself included) just keep their fingertips warm naturally.
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On Sat, 27 Oct 2012 19:32:43 +0100, Tim Watts wrote:

CostCo have some work gloves that are pretty damn good. I've used the "general building glove" but the CostCo ones are better particularly for fiddly/fine work. They also seem to last longer when drystone walling so pretty hard wearing.
The CostCo gloves are these:
http://www.diygloves.co.uk/product.php?id_product=12
CostCo Dec '11 14.39 inc VAT box of 10 size 10/XL.
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Cheers
Dave.




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Dave Liquorice wrote:

Thanks Dave - they look good!
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On 27/10/12 19:32, Tim Watts wrote:

How much for protection and how much for keeping warm. Woollen gloves without fingertips are good (I use them for winter photography) if cold is a problem, but not ideal if handling rough materials.
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