stud partition 'butress' first floor

Hi,
I am currently erecting a studpartition, on the first floor in my en terraced house. I have a very good book which tells me all sorts o stuff, and in this book it says the following....
"Internal buttressing to external walls in upper floors may be provide by stud partitions providing that.....
The partition is not less than 1200mm long
Kiln dried studs are used (75x35 min at 400 max centres)
Two rows of noggings are provided
The end stud is fixed to the wall using drilled screw fixings.
And there is a picture of a stud partition at 90 degrees to an externa wall. The picture shows the wall to have 4 upright studs the firs showing the screw points to the external wall. in between each stu there are two noggings. at 1/3rd and 2/3rd height. The head plate an sole plate shown are both single (i.e. not double as for loa bearing).
Now then I am slightly confused as to why they give this minimum wal length (1200) is neccessary, I assume they mean a door cannot be pu into this initial length. I want mine to be load bearing (double sol and head plate 50x100) because it will supporting the joists (50x100 in the attic. On the ceiling there are 12mm plasterboards, and in th attic there will be 100mm loft insulation, and polyfoam supadec flooring will be on top of this. Polyfoam supadeck is 100mm of XPS foa laminated with chipboard flooring each measures 1200 X 600 and weigh 13Kg. There will be 22 of these in the central section of the attic. I addition to this will be the stuff actually stored in the attic. SO yo can see why I want the walls to be load bearing.
The book annoyingly does not say what is special about butressing ont an external wall. They do not mention the wall is load bearing or no and the illustration certainly is not load bearing.
My original design would have a door opening directly next to th external wall, however I was thinking I would make the initial wal section atleast 300mm because it will be load bearing (as described) Bringing it away from the wall will provide additional strength.
The problem for me is, I can (theoretically) accomodate a 1200m initial wall length before the door, but it will mean the door is no in the corner of the bedroom (desirable) and the door will not b directly opposite the top of the staircase. Also this 1200 + doorway 800 - 900mm will be longer than I had planned for this section o wall+door (I had planned approx door + 900mm of wall giving a total o about 1800mm. I don't want to use a slimmer doorway to get aroun this.
Does anyone here know why the book says this about buttressing a stu partition to an external upper floor wall
-- wig
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BUMPbumpbum
-- wig
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They are talking about "special" stud partition as strengthening to an external wall just like a brick or stone buttress. You can ignore this as most studding is intended to support only itself. But studding can be made structural e.g as a load bearing wall, if necessary, and a good idea too if you prefer woodwork to bricklaying, but you would need a structural engineer and a proper spec. What is the book btw?
cheers Jacob

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wig wrote:

Doors stuffed against the wall tend to reduce usable space.
Forget the 4' thing.
NT
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