Spice up the wife...

I have been messing about in the workshop again:
http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php/Spice_rack
(first draft, so expect typos etc)
--
Cheers,

John.
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John Rumm scribbled

The H&S alarm goes off at seeing the rack, particularly the drawers behind the cooker hob.
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"Jonno" wrote in message

In one of my Buy-to-Let flats they refused to install a replacement gas hob as there was a blanked off socket in the wall behind - blanked with the usual pvc blanking plate. Had to replace with a metal one
btw nice work, but good luck dusting out the scroll patterns on the ends :)
Andrew
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On Wednesday, January 13, 2016 at 9:48:43 AM UTC, Andrew Mawson wrote:

But they are the *key* to the whole piece!
arf...
J^n
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On 13/01/2016 08:40, Jonno wrote:

How are they worse that reaching for something on the shelf that was there before (and is 10" above the hob anyway)?
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John.
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John Rumm scribbled

I'm wary of reaching over saucepans. It's something I'd avoid. If you're happy, then it is obviously not a problem.
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On Wednesday, 13 January 2016 10:54:47 UTC, John Rumm wrote:

Oak is fuel. Surely you know you should live in an all ceramic house with no soft furnishings.
NT
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On 13/01/2016 13:54, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Yeahbut, it adds a nice smoky flavour to things ;-)
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John.
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On Wednesday, 13 January 2016 17:14:33 UTC, John Rumm wrote:

exactly.
NT
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On 13/01/2016 01:41, John Rumm wrote:

My spice rack was made in a couple of hours from scrap SYP and dowel and fixed on the back of a door:
https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/33860087/20160113_091035.jpg ... it works well but not as pretty as yours.
There are a couple of interesting jigs there: one for cutting the box joints and also the "sledge". It would be interesting to have a few more snippets about them ...
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On 13/01/2016 09:15, no snipped-for-privacy@thanks.com wrote:

I think yours is pretty neat actually... holds plenty as well!

You I can do...
I have written bits about them in the past, but its probably spread over several different projects. What kind of stuff do you want to know?
I could do a "how to make" type article, although there are plenty out there on youtube etc already. (IIRC William Ng has done a very detailed one on how to get the setup of a cross cut sledge absolutely bang on).
The finger joint jig at its simplest is just a variation on the theme of:
http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php/Making_equally_spaced_cuts
Mine was originally built for doing 1/2" fingers, but then I realised if I did an extra saddle to drop into it, it could double up as a 1/4" version as well. (the only downside with the way I did it, is I don't have much cutting depth left with my 8" dado blades, so can only do 1/4" joints on thin stock.
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Cheers,

John.
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On 13/01/2016 17:17, John Rumm wrote:

I hadn't heard of a crosscut sled until your write-up - are there any advantages compared to a crosscut carriage? I mostly use a Bestcombi 2000 (like this
https://www.biggersavings.co.uk/uploaded/thumbnails/db_file_img_2283_1024x1024.jpg ) which has a crosscut carriage.

Aha! So the extra pieces on top are to adapt the 1/2" jig for 1/4" joints - light dawns. My dado cutters don't fit the saw spindle so I've used a Woodrat for comb/finger/box joints but have had difficulty getting good joints. You've jogged me into thinking it might be time to make an adapter for the spindle - another job on the list ;-)
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On 13/01/2016 19:03, no snipped-for-privacy@thanks.com wrote:

That's what I would normally call a sliding table. Very nice to have and way better than using a mitre guide in a slot on a normal table saw. However its a subtly different thing from a sledge, which is nice to use since the whole work surface on both sides of the blade moves, so you are not leaving the cut off bit behind...
A sledge also makes it easy to do repeated non through cuts - say when kerf bending wood.
If you have a sliding table, then I would guess its less "necessary" than I is for a normal table saw.

Yup... I was just being lazy, to save making a separate jig.

One of the advantages of having a saw made in 1948... elf'n'safety had not got involved yet ;-)
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Cheers,

John.
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Very pretty, but on the bottom row, you have all the green tops together. Could we have the top row organised with the black and brown tops together, please? Oh, and in alphabetical order :-)
Lovely job, John.
--
Graeme

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On Wednesday, 13 January 2016 02:41:38 UTC+1, John Rumm wrote:

You do know some of us hate you, don't you?
At least SWMBO never reads usenet so she will never see how pathetic my work is.
(Or, with my tongue removed from my cheek, Wow! I wish I could do stuff like that.)
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On Wednesday, 13 January 2016 13:19:00 UTC, Martin Bonner wrote:

you could probabley use a laser cutter to get those shapes now wouldn;t be difficut if you knew how to use the software.
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On 13/01/2016 13:18, Martin Bonner wrote:

;-)

Tis partly why I write some of these things up in the hope someone finds it useful, either as a source of ideas, or for some tips and tricks.
(not only that, people often have comments on how I could have done it better/different!)
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wrote:

Ok.
"But, but, but -- it's too small already!"
I like the f-holes.

I might have used a different finish, because oiling may be affected by the cleaners that take off the grease film that gets on everything near an active hob. (But then cleaner-proof finishes might look plasticky...)
Here's my spice "rack", a drawer actually.
<http://www.pic-upload.de/view-29424186/Spice.jpg.html
Made by a chippie friend. It shows how makes drawers: He makes a lot of these to a price, so uses birch multiplex, and a 4mm blade in a table saw for the join. There's a rebate to hold the bottom, made with the same blade. There isn't much in the way of critical adjustments, so no jigs, just a test piece, and a few taps to the fence to get it ok. Glue the corners, clamp with two clamps, tap top level, flip drawer over and immediately put in the bottom with small torx, and the bottom holds the drawer square. No glue on the bottom, because it binds. He'd whip up dozens in an hour or two.
Detail of a corner:
<http://www.pic-upload.de/view-29424192/Join.jpg.html
*Fast* & no frills. Looks good in multiplex, less so in solid wood.
And if you'd like to do drawer joins in a more traditional way, really fast, here is something to aspire to:

https://youtu.be/YFqY73lelq8

https://youtu.be/YFqY73lelq8

May require practice:-)
Thomas prufer
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On 14/01/2016 08:23, Thomas Prufer wrote:

You will note that the shelves will take two rows of bottles on the top and three on the bottom if she really must! ;-)
(it was about as big as I could build it for that location to be fair - can't have another shelf since it would hit the cooker hood - its deeper than needs be for just one row of bottles, but the depth was partly dictated by making the drawers a useful depth)

The finishing oil is a "setting" oil, so is fairly durable I find. The wax ought to help also. It has the advantage of being easy to reapply and touch up if needs be. (and does not smell so bad when drying as poly)

I find it difficult to source decent Baltic birch ply locally, which is a shame, as its a nice material to work with for things like that.

Yup nice... I have done some in the same way although I used a quarter inch cutter in a router. The table saw method is worth keeping in mind though, since it will be faster.

Hoes does not mess about does he!

Just a bit...
(I can do them almost as fast with a jig and router - that's if you exclude the 20 mins setup and tuning first!)
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John.
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wrote:

And poly can look horribly greasy.
Chippie had nitrocellulose lacquer, which is very forgiving, and touches up well, and dries extremely fast. (But it needs a sprayer, stinks, and it's not very waterproof -- and the lacquer thinner fumes are wicked.)

He'd get lots of sheets, as it's clean-looking, and warp-resistant. Came off a lorry, delivery not a problem if you order half a dozen 1,50 by 3,00...
I like the look of the edges: We glued up a stack of thick birch multiplex (40 or 50mm, something like that), a central layer of wengewood, and multiplex. , and had a wood turner make conically tapered legs out of it. Made a very interesting pattern (though the inside of multiplex turns out to be not entirely uniform, with occasional voids and overlaps in the veneer).

He would go through several sheets of birch play, and turn them into drawers, not taking more than an hour to cite them. He had the sequence of sanding, cutting, making the joins etc. down cold, and would spend more time spraying and sanding them than making them.

Did you see the around-the-corner frame saw he used? Neat trick...
Thomas Prufer
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