Slightly OT: Advice needed regarding electricity meter rating

Hi,
This is not strictly DIY as I won't be playing around with the meter but I would appreciate some advice.
I have just moved into a flat where the heating was originally supplied via an under-floor system, the previous owner didn't really like this and had it disconnected (albeit not in a way that it couldn't be reinstated if necessary) and relied on oil-filled rads dotted around - it's a small flat so this isn't too reasonable. I'm quite comfortable with this but have been looking to change the tariff that I'm on as I'm only in the property a few days a week and the tariff isn't particularly cheap. However because of the original under-floor heating the property is on an Economy 10 tariff where there are two meters, one discounted meter for the bonus rate heating period (which obviously doesn't move) and a normal Economy 7 dual rate meter (that does move!). This means I am extremely limited in the tariffs that I can change to and am not getting the full benefit of the tariff that I do have (plus paying a standing charge for the 'bonus' rate that I can't use).
I would like to get rid of the second meter but retain the option of having the under-floor system reconnected if necessary (mainly with a future resale in mind) and have discussed with the supplier about removing the extra meter and having the under-floor supply routed through the Economy 7 meter. The supplier is amenable to this but aren't sure whether the E7 meter would be sufficiently rated to cope with the extra load, as not unreasonably they don't want to do it only to find it blows the meter and leaves me without any electricity.
Does this sound like it would be an issue?
I'm quite happy to get a sparky in to have a look and give a first-hand opinion but wanted to tap into the collective knowledge here first to get a feel if I was barking up totally the wrong tree or if there was a different solution I could look at.
Any help gratefully recieved :)
Cheers.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 21/11/2011 18:48, Endulini wrote:

What are the ratings of the two meters?
How are the two meters connected to the supply (Are they both protected by one big fuse, or do they both have their own fuse? What is the rating of this fuse, or these fuses?
I assume the UFH has a separate consumer unit, if so, is this still there, and if so, what is the rating of the fuse or MCB(s) for it?
Or just take a picture of the install, with any text on things in focus, upload it to somewhere like tinypic and post a link to it here.
However, I expect it will be fine if it is all in a small flat...
--
Toby...
Remove pants to reply
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Meters are capable of 100A even if rated for less (I recall it is their accuracy test). Switching is probably handled by Teleswitch which comprises a timer or radio receiver & contactor. The Economy 7 contactor needs to be the same size as that on the Economy 10 install - and most likely is. Examine the timer/contactor boxes carefully as they usually have it written on them. Thus it should be possible to simply move tails from the Economy 10 to Economy 7 install.
However you may have two problems. Firstly do not rule out the old system not having a fault - they do fail. Secondly the thermal wattage & thermal mass may have been matched to economy 10 - that is to say it may go cold by evening since it assumed two further top-ups during the day and evening. It might also get too hot during the economy 7 period, although I suspect not because there should be a thermostat suitably placed (although I recall some had poor response so you either suffered too hot or too cold, never mind the complication of the weather!).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

There shouldnt be any limitation on available tariffs. If you take a non E7 or E10 tariff you just pay the same price for both meters, and one never moves.
NT
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 21/11/2011 19:47, NT wrote:

I suspect that the OP wants to go onto a "no standing charge" tariff if the property is only occupied some of the time in the hope that he won't use enough dear units to offset the standing charge. Some (possibly all?) suppliers won't let you go onto a no standing charge tariff if you have an off-peak supply.
--
Cheers,
Roger
____________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 21 Nov 2011 23:03:00 +0000, Roger Mills wrote:

Some (possibly

we have just moved off an economy 7 tariff with no standing charge
--
(º•.¸(¨*•.¸ ¸.•*¨)¸.•º)
<.•°•. Nik .•°•.>
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Nov 21, 7:47pm, NT wrote:

A lot of billing systems can't cope with 3 meter readings, whether it moves or not it would still have to be read.
Owain
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"NT" wrote in message wrote:

There shouldnt be any limitation on available tariffs. If you take a non E7 or E10 tariff you just pay the same price for both meters, and one never moves.
That's as maybe but none of the suppliers I've contacted are willing to take me unless I change the meters.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Endulini" wrote in message
Hi,
This is not strictly DIY as I won't be playing around with the meter but I would appreciate some advice.
I have just moved into a flat where the heating was originally supplied via an under-floor system, the previous owner didn't really like this and had it disconnected (albeit not in a way that it couldn't be reinstated if necessary) and relied on oil-filled rads dotted around - it's a small flat so this isn't too reasonable. I'm quite comfortable with this but have been looking to change the tariff that I'm on as I'm only in the property a few days a week and the tariff isn't particularly cheap. However because of the original under-floor heating the property is on an Economy 10 tariff where there are two meters, one discounted meter for the bonus rate heating period (which obviously doesn't move) and a normal Economy 7 dual rate meter (that does move!). This means I am extremely limited in the tariffs that I can change to and am not getting the full benefit of the tariff that I do have (plus paying a standing charge for the 'bonus' rate that I can't use).
I would like to get rid of the second meter but retain the option of having the under-floor system reconnected if necessary (mainly with a future resale in mind) and have discussed with the supplier about removing the extra meter and having the under-floor supply routed through the Economy 7 meter. The supplier is amenable to this but aren't sure whether the E7 meter would be sufficiently rated to cope with the extra load, as not unreasonably they don't want to do it only to find it blows the meter and leaves me without any electricity.
Does this sound like it would be an issue?
I'm quite happy to get a sparky in to have a look and give a first-hand opinion but wanted to tap into the collective knowledge here first to get a feel if I was barking up totally the wrong tree or if there was a different solution I could look at.
Any help gratefully recieved :)
Cheers.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Been thinking about this further and had another thought. Surely the question is redundant in the first place as the heating system is only routed through the second, Economy 10, meter during the 'bonus' times. Any other time of day it goes through the primary, Economy 7 type meter, which was therefore obviously able to handle the loading of the heating system all along. Is this too obvious, have I missed something fundamental?
Thanks
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Endulini wrote:

You probably only have one cutout fuse supplying both meters, in which case you can generally assume either meter can handle full load (be it 80 or 100A).
Look on the meter, it should have all the technical details printed on it, including max current.
Your cut out fuse will have been sized for the whole load, unless the electricity co sneakily changed it.
If the supplier cannot tell you if the E7 meter is suitably rated (it almost certainly is) then you are talking to a helpdesk droid instead of a person who knows anything (I had this problem with EDF).
3 solutions to getting a sane answer:
1) Write to then stating that you wish to be supplied on a certain tariff and will be presenting a certain max load. Ask them to confirm this is OK, or arrange to upgrade your equipment until it is OK.
2) Ring the "emergency number" and ask there. They may get huffy, but with persistence you will probably be able to speak to someone approximating to an engineer.
3) (The one I'd try) - look out for one of their vans nearby on a job. Talk nicely to the bloke and ask if he'd mind having a cup of tea round your place while he has a quick look at the supply. Probaly the quickest way to a sane answer.
--
Tim Watts

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Tim Watts" wrote in message

You probably only have one cutout fuse supplying both meters, in which case you can generally assume either meter can handle full load (be it 80 or 100A).
Look on the meter, it should have all the technical details printed on it, including max current.
Your cut out fuse will have been sized for the whole load, unless the electricity co sneakily changed it.
If the supplier cannot tell you if the E7 meter is suitably rated (it almost certainly is) then you are talking to a helpdesk droid instead of a person who knows anything (I had this problem with EDF).
3 solutions to getting a sane answer:
1) Write to then stating that you wish to be supplied on a certain tariff and will be presenting a certain max load. Ask them to confirm this is OK, or arrange to upgrade your equipment until it is OK.
2) Ring the "emergency number" and ask there. They may get huffy, but with persistence you will probably be able to speak to someone approximating to an engineer.
3) (The one I'd try) - look out for one of their vans nearby on a job. Talk nicely to the bloke and ask if he'd mind having a cup of tea round your place while he has a quick look at the supply. Probaly the quickest way to a sane answer.
--
Tim Watts

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Endulini wrote:

Please fix your newreader... Quoting is dire and don't use "----" as a message break as it gets chopped off in replies for looking like a signature which is demarked by "--"
Anyway... Have you looked at your meters for a rating on the dial plate?
--
Tim Watts

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Please fix your news reader "----" isn't a sig and shouldn't cause anything to get chopped off.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 22 Dec 2011 11:38:11 +0000, Tim Watts wrote:

Shouldn't do, as the separator is "-- "...!
--
Use the BIG mirror service in the UK:
http://www.mirrorservice.org
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.