should DIY be a green cause

In the interests of the conservation of materials and energy, should not DIY, especially the repair of goods, be a priority for the environmental movement?
Bill
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Yes. But the problem is that younger people are much more likely to be renting which makes DIY rather harder for them.
Certainly some of them are into DIY, most obviously with the fringe loons that make their houses entirely out of scrap they can find.
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On 23/03/2016 03:39, Bill Wright wrote:

It must present an interesting conflict for many a green... on the one hand it is a very good fit with the political ideology, and yet on the other the knowledge requirements and attention to detail required are likely to be counter to the (lack of) thought process that makes much green policy seem even plausible in the first place.
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On 23/03/16 09:22, John Rumm wrote:

WTF is a 'green cause'
Mould?
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Very true with some.
Have a pal who is into 'green' Replaced his Mini which he'd bought new and had done few miles (9,000 in 3 years) with an electric Smart car. Claiming it will save money as well as the planet. It's one of these where you rent the battery. The total cost per mile of his motoring must be horrendous. But tries to wind me up about my gas guzzling ancient Rover. ;-)
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*Whatever kind of look you were going for, you missed.

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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wrote:

Now was that a Mini or a BMW?
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Adam


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On 23/03/16 19:40, ARW wrote:

Lol! I've always thought that BMW's use of "Mini" for their monstrosity should be considered an infringement under the Trades Description Act. And, as far as I can see, with each revised model they are getting bigger and bigger.
Mind you, have you seen a Fiat 500 recently?!
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Jeff

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On Thursday, 24 March 2016 09:06:29 UTC, Jeff Layman wrote:

In fairness if they copied the original it would be a death trap.
NT
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I know but Doug looks well.
http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php/File:Mini.jpg
--
Adam


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I had one a bit like that (PKX 886M). Sold it in 1985 IIRC. Used to see it for a couple of years afterwards, gradually growing extra fog lights, walnut dashboard, coach lines, etc.
Owner probably got up one morning to find a pile of rust on the driveway, topped off with walnut panel and chrome fog lights...
Parents had one many years before in British Racing green, with sliding windows and pull-cord door openers. (ABL 270B)
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Andrew Gabriel
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In that era, I was introduced to body shop in Teddington "George, the only man who can weld two bits of rust together". I had an Anglia - just as rusty
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from KT24 in Surrey, England

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writes:

My Mum had LCP140N in lemon yellow. My brother and myself crashed it (don't ask as we were both under 17 years old).
And need I say more?
http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/images/4/42/Letherdrive.jpg
Doug has had more paint spray jobs than an Essex girl has had fake spray tans.
--
Adam


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On Wednesday, 23 March 2016 10:22:04 UTC+1, John Rumm wrote:

Can't speak for any other Green, but I find no conflict.

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As far as repairing goods is concerned, the whole point of mass production certainly since the Industrial Revolutiin is to manufacture and assemble all goods as far as possible by machine with as little labour input as possible. As its this that makes goods so cheap in the first place.
Given economies of scale and labour costs its usually far more economic to manufacture a new item from scratch than it is to train up technicians to disassemble, diagnose and repair faults, maintain an inventory of spares etc.Especially when new models might be introduced on an annual basis.
In larger items such as cars these are often broken down into sub-assemblies, headlights etc which need to be replaced entirely and are imposible to repair.
Although this may be wastful of material, overall the cost saving in labour is probably far greater than any labour costs incurred in sourcing new material. For the present at least
This really is old stuff; going all the way back to Vance Packard and the "Waste Makers" in the 50's/60's.

So which particular knowledge requirements and attention to detail are you suggesting might reasonable be subsituted for say an injection moulding machine or a numerically controlled lathe ?
michael adams
...
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On Wednesday, 23 March 2016 12:07:20 UTC, michael adams wrote:

That's all half true. The reality is a considerable percentage of what's faulty & what's thrown away is worth repairing. And much isn't.
NT
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On Wednesday, 23 March 2016 12:30:56 UTC, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Does anyone get thier shoes repaired anymore. Seen wuite a few mobile phone case shops doing key cutting PC & Mac repairs and shoe repairs all from one shop.
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wrote:

With modern moulded composition soles i.e around 90% of Clarks shoes nowadays, never mind the cheap end of the market, proper repair is impossible as they're made as a unit.
Traditional shoes with leather shoes can still be repaired and there are plenty of cobblers around if you know where to look.
Many of the kiosks appear to specialise in repairing heels on women's shoes.
michael adams
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On Wed, 23 Mar 2016 13:40:26 +0000, michael adams wrote:

I had a pair of Ecco shoes with moulded one piece soles re-heeled last year by one of those key cutter/shoe mender shops and he did a great job and they're still in good nick.
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There is one operation in my town that does that.

Never seen that here. Forget what else the shoe repairer does, but it certainly isnt what you listed.
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There's also the cost of someone's time to be taken into account. DIY repairs can be worth doing, but paying someone do to the job is most likely uneconomic.
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England

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