Seeking shed plans for inaccessible location

I wish to erect a shed in the corner of my garden. Two sides of the shed will be no more than 10 cm from fences. So I need a means of erecting a shed from the inside. The two sides referred to could be built nearby and slid sideways into position, but the problem is fixing them to the framework. Shed base to be not more than 183 cm square. Any thoughts about where I may find plans for such a shed?
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Frederick Williams wrote:

Is it not possible to erect the entire shed remotely, and then slide then entire thing into place a la Belle Tout Lighthouse?
JGH
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jgharston wrote:

I shall be working on my own and moving a whole shed--even a small one--may not be possible.
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On 17/04/2012 21:34, Frederick Williams wrote:

I built a 12 x 8 shed, using fairly solid construction (3/4" shiplap on 3x2" framing), in a similar circumstance, and had no difficulty shifting it with two walls clad and attached to a floor assembly.
This was how close to the boundary it was:
http://www.internode.co.uk/workshop/images/thebase.jpg
Shifted it enough to get behind and clad. Clad, and pushed it back again:
http://www.internode.co.uk/workshop/images/4walls.jpg
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jgharston wrote:

Buy a number of tortoises and wait until they hibernate. Mount the shed on their shells and put some lettuce in the corner of the garden. When the tortoises wake up they will see the lettuce and crawl towards it, taking the shed with them.
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wrote:

That's not such a daft idea, in my opinion. Well... not tortoises exactly, but if I had to build a shed into an awkward corner, I'd be tempted to build it somewhere easily accessible then roll it into place on round wooden poles. The round wooden poles become the floor joists and, once the flooring has been nailed in place, the whole thing becomes rock solid.
Nick
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Frederick Williams wrote:

Thanks for the replies. What dimensions of timber should I use for the frame, and what timber should I use for the cladding? (Sorry, I know nothing about these things.)
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Frederick Williams wrote:

And what timber should be used for the floor, what angle should the roof slope at, and what should the roof be made of and covered in?
The wood in contact with the hard standing (or whatever the word may be, it's made of 18" square paving slabs) will get wet when it rains and stay wet for some time thereafter. How do I stop it from rotting?
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On Tue, 17 Apr 2012 22:15:17 +0100, Frederick Williams wrote:

If you're happy with a non-timber substitute, the resin sheds would be easy. You can build those from the inside...
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On 17/04/2012 22:15, Frederick Williams wrote:

Depends on what you want to spend and how solid you want it to be...
Cheap light commercial sheds will use framing that may be as skimpy as 35mm square, and not much of it, and then 12mm shiplap.
Something like the first workshop I built:
http://www.internode.co.uk/workshop/plans.htm
Detail:
http://www.internode.co.uk/workshop/phase3.htm
Used significantly heavier timber and cladding.

You could opt for none (i.e. the floor is whatever base its sat on). However IME 19mm WBP ply makes a decent floor.

In my design I specced 30 deg, however when I built it, I found 20 looked "right"

12mm OSB3 is probably a reasonable choice if reasonably well supported.
For covering I would use a couple of layers of torch on felt... probably a 2mm underlay, and a 4mm cap sheet. That will give a very good and long lasting roof.
Cheap shed felt will cost far less however, but probably won't last 5 years.

You can stand it off the base on blocks / bricks / or sacrificial timber bearers.
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You can combine this with one of the other ideas. Use substantial round pressure treated fencing posts as the rollers. Try Countrywide or a similar farm shop, rather than a "shed". These should last ages when resting on paving slabs. Screw through the floor to hold them in position. When / if they rot and need replacing, undo the screws, roll / drag it back and replace them. I'd be inclined to use 3 for a 6x6 shed.
Cheapest construction method is feather edge fence board, with boards horizontal (pointing upwards). As others have said, don't skimp on the roof.
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jgharston wrote:

Thank you. I didn't know it existed.
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On 17/04/2012 22:15, Frederick Williams wrote:

TBH it sounds like you would be better off buying a shed. They are delivered as 4 sides, a base & 2 roof sections.
Assemble & slide into place.
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The Medway Handyman wrote:

Sliding may be impractical: I am shall be working on my own and I am not strong.
Sliding may be impossible: a bought shed will be susceptible to damp too, and I may wish it to go up on to bricks (or blocks of some kind).
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Frederick Williams wrote:

use levers and wedges etc.

yup. I am thinking 'shed' too and a brick plinth THEN DPC THEN timber - and pantiles on the roof, seems to be where its at :).
I am sick of replacing felt..
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The Natural Philosopher wrote:

It is a well-known fact that the ancient Egyptians had the help of alien spacemen when they needed to move sheds.
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On 19/04/2012 20:36, Frederick Williams wrote:

I think you may be over estimating the quantity of wood used in commercial sheds. Getting them to not blow away is usually more of a problem.

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On 2012-04-17, Frederick Williams wrote:

I built a shed by putting the posts up first, then adding horizontal and diagonal members between them, then screwing plywood from the inside to form 3 of the walls (close to fences and a hedge), and finally putting cladding on the (fully accessible) front. Oh, and I put a corrugated plastic roof on it too (working mainly from the inside and front, but a little from the back).
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Dave Liquorice wrote:

That is what I shall do. Thank you. Now, before bolting the frames together should I apply glue to the wood surfaces? My thought is that a long vertical gap (be it ever so thin) will let in moisture as rain runs down. Glue will keep the moisture out; it's role as an adhesive being secondary. What do you think?
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On 18/04/2012 16:45, Frederick Williams wrote:

Fit a length of gutter to that side, and direct into a water but... save letting the inaccessible side get too wet.
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