Securing a gate . . .

Having just had a neighbour's break-in (keys to car stolen, nothing else), and
caught on camera several quite open casing-the-joint forays into our between
the houses passageway (my Audi's next, apparently), we've just had a metal
gate fitted. It's fine, quite substantial.
However, the latch and hinges are fitted with easy to remove hex nuts (fixing
the adjustable screw hinge) and bolts (holding the latch and hinge pins to the
brick wall).
I'd drop a spot of weld to the various bits if I had the kit and skill - but I
don't. Any recommendations for a supplier and type of secure nuts and bolts?
They don't have to be the last word in security - really, the padlockable
latch isn't that secure.
Cheers, Rob
Reply to
RJH
As well as dealing with securing the hex nuts, maybe consider something like this to offer another visible and effective deterrent:
Reply to
Jeff Layman
Thanks - seen those, but they don't seem to supply retail, only via a web form. And I'm curious about the torque at which the head snaps off. My experience of bolting stuff to the brick of these houses hasn't been too promising - so if it does need to be tightened *tight* they might not work.
Cheers, Rob
Reply to
RJH
On 13 Feb 2020 at 22:25:46 GMT, " snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com" wrote:
Thanks - drilling out the head of a large pozi screw would seem to be a crude but effective solution . . .
Cheers, Rob
Reply to
RJH
Most of the crooks around here are either after the catalytic converters or just getting the electronic codes to open the cars and filch anything inside. Brian
Reply to
Brian Gaff (Sofa 2)
On 13 Feb 2020 at 22:07:26 GMT, "Jeff Layman" wrote:
Yes, perhaps I should. Irony being my car is pretty much the least valuable on the street (2007 Audi S3) . . .
Reply to
RJH
This is a job for the uk.d-i-y angle grinder. Use it to take the corners off the nuts and bolts, so that a spanner can't grip them. You can use it again if you ever need to remove them.
Alternatively, should you want to be able to use a spanner on them yourself, drill through one of the flats on the nuts and through the bits the bolts pass through. Tap the holes and fit pointed hex socket grub screws to grip the threads.
Reply to
nightjar
Then you can drill it out, on that rare occasion when you might have to. The crims won't bother to try anyway. If they want to get through it then they'll use brute force if they think that would do it.
Reply to
Andrew
Use bolts that need an allen key to tighten, then fill the hex recess with something that sets quite hard.
Reply to
Andrew
I have a grate secured with Torx screws, a round head like the head of a coach bolt, only with a regular Torx recess. These came with small aluminum slugs that one is to hammer into the recess. I touched up the head with zinc paint, and the slug is not longer apparent.
I had to remove the screw screw, and gently drilling out the aluminum middle, and then picking out the bits in the grooves is possible, given time, patience, and the knowledge of the ally slug. Thieves would likely have none of the above...
Recessed hex would work just as well, I think.
Thomas Prufer
Reply to
Thomas Prufer
If the bad guys have a battery angle grinder then they can go through most things quite quickly (albeit noisily). I lost a padlock key recently and it took much less than a minute to cut through the staple. Could you use a different style of lock, rather than a padlock? Alternatively, shipping containers have a hardened steel cover over the lock, which is completely inside the cover - search for "lock box".
Reply to
nothanks
But would attract considerable attention to themselves when doing that and there are clearly surveillance cameras there.
Reply to
jon lopgel
Padlocks are often very easy to undo silently. Something better is called for if anything more than casual offputting security is wanted.
NT
Reply to
tabbypurr

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