Some kitchen questions.

My kitchen is in need of a bit of a refresh. Not a total re-fit, though.
I built it all myself when money was tight. And ready made units cost more (pro rata) than today.
All the floor units are basically one, made from approx 30mm square section timber with mortice and tenon joints. 'Legs' which run from floor to worktop one piece and a door's width apart. The whole lot firmly fixed to brick walls. Tops are blockboard and tiled.
Most of the timber came for free as scrap lengths from the company I worked for.
Doors and drawer fronts were bought ready made - and have been changed recently, so still OK.
All the carcasing? is immensely strong and rigid compared to the usual chipboard, and I don't intend changing it.
But I'd like new worktops. Possibly something like Corian? I realise this is likely a totally pro job. Is it strong enough to sit on top of the carcasing or does it need additional support like ply or whatever under it? And what would be a very rough cost for about 9 metres total (three walls with a peninsula unit, so 3 mitre or whatever joins. And a cutout for a sink and hob. A rough guess would be fine, as I've zero idea of the cost.
Other thing is the cooker hood which is ancient. It extracts to the outside via a vent behind it. Still works fine - just old looking. Most of the 'pretty' ones I see now seem to have a chimney. Can those be vented anywhere up that chimney - or only at the top? I don't mind moving the hole in the outside wall if needed. But the closer it is to the hood itself the better.
Last thing. The entire kitchen is tiled, and I don't want to change them. Obviously some will need replacing where the new hood goes in, and round the new worktops. I do have some spares - but will have lots from the old worktops. However I used some type of semi-flexible waterproof mortar bed to stick them to the blockboard, which has survived very well indeed. I think the small (2x2") very strong tiles will come off the wood intact - but how about removing the mortar from them?
--
*Money isn?t everything, but it sure keeps the kids in touch

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 13/02/2020 15:32, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

It may depend on the type of mortar used, when I moved a few things around in my kitchen a few of the tiles I wanted to reuse I got off in 1 piece and then soaked overnight in a bucket of water and the `mortar` scraped off easily enough.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 13/02/2020 15:38, ss wrote:

if it's cement based soking in HCl works eventually
--
Those who want slavery should have the grace to name it by its proper
name. They must face the full meaning of that which they are advocating
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 13/02/2020 17:16, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

Is that brick acid?
Be interesting to see what it does to tiles. HCl is stored in glass, and the glaze on tiles is effectively glass, so that sounds promising. But any defects in the glaze could let the acid attack the colour underneath, and of course the baked clay is porous.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I was wondering if that was the answer. The tiles are extremely strong - can be used on a floor. So I'd guess porcelain. The adhesive is definitely a waterproof mortar based one.
--
*I couldn't repair your brakes, so I made your horn louder *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 14/02/2020 11:17, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

I still think you may be over-worrying about the need to reclaim these tiles.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It would depend on the thickness of the new worktops. At the moment the existing tiles start with full ones where the current worktop meets the wall. If it is the same thickness fine. If thinner, I may have to add some. If thicker, easy to remove the bottom row of tiles and trim them - as they're held to the wall with ordinary tile adhesive.
But I expect I'll have to make good round the new cooker hood. The old is mounted directly to the wall and tiled round.
--
*Letting a cat out of the bag is easier than putting it back in *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 14/02/2020 15:15, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

My suggestion is to put a small upstand at the back of the new Corian worktop (or whatever you decide to get). Then butt that up against the face of the tiles. It looks very effective, and it provides a 100% waterproof joint.
Generally, modern worktops tend to be 38mm. You can get thinner, but they don't look as good. The current blockboard + tiles worktop is surely quite a bit thinner? More like 25mm, perhaps? Hence, to save a hell of a lot of messing about, I suggest that the new worktop is butted up against the face of the tiles.

You said you had a few spare tiles?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Simply don't like added on upstands. Look a bodge to me.
--
*Real men don't waste their hormones growing hair

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No expense spared on my wife's new kitchen (she paid for it:-).
The Corian work top wraps up the wall and forms a window sill.
Incredibly neat workmanship.
She specified a Quooker without realising this meant she could not have a sink entirely of Corian (heat). The fitter cut out the sink bottom and put in a stainless steel base.
Part of the cost is because they do a *measure up visit* and create hardboard templates.

--
Tim Lamb

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

An upstand that forms part of the corian would be fine. It's an added type I don't like.
--
*Frustration is trying to find your glasses without your glasses.

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

25 miles up the road! Come and see it or I could post a photo.

--
Tim Lamb

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Can anyone give a very rough idea of costs? Say per metre of a standard width worktop? Just that I really have no idea at all, and Google doesn't help.
A couple of grand might be OK. 10 wouldn't. ;-)

--
*I didn't drive my husband crazy -- I flew him there -- it was faster

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 16 Feb 2020 13:58:10 +0000, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

According to Worktops.org "Corian is priced from £120 to £170 in a number of limited styles. The styles stocked are sourced from ex-stock inventories of lines which are no longer part of the Corian range."
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Much head scratching.... she doesn't really know!
John Lewis!! Initial visit to measure up. Follow up visit to install. Payment of 8k somewhere about the time.
This was sink/drainer, 4m work top/upstand and 2 wrap around window sills. 1.5m promontory and a large island unit.
--
Tim Lamb

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

A bit more Googling asking a different question found a site that could give a near enough price based on a sketch.
--
*When blondes have more fun, do they know it?

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 16/02/2020 13:58, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

You can get a rough idea here: https://ukworktopsdirect.co.uk/worktops-price-calculator/
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 15/02/2020 11:37, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

You can butt up against the face of the tiles without an upstand.
A friend has recently redone their kitchen. White glossy units, and white glossy walls (not tiles, some sort of sheet material). Black Corian worktop with an upstand. It looks *extremely* smart - IMHO of course.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 13/02/2020 15:32, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

I can't help you with your other questions, but perhaps I can about the tiles, as we have recently replaced a couple of worktops.
First, we got the old worktops out without breaking any of the existing tiles. Quite easy, with care. We just unscrewed them and scraped out any mastic/grout joining them to the tiles.
Second, you might think it's a great idea to slide the new worktop in under the old tiles. In practice, it's even better to have a thicker worktop that butts up against the face of the tiles. If you are going for Corian, get them to incorporate a 5cms upstand at the back, and the whole join is then completely waterproof, no matter what.
3. If the tile cement is waterproof, you can't get it off. Well, I haven't succeeded, anyway, even with weeks of soaking.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 13/02/2020 15:32, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

For worktops, perhaps take a look at Maia http://www.maiaworksurfaces.co.uk/ As far as I remember it is available in lengths so unless you want anything complicated could be DIY'd. A basic masons mitre should be doable with a suitable router.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.