Screws/Raw plug advice required from DIY ol'timer

Ok.
I guess the reason most websites and DIY books don't go into too much detail is they expect everyone to know this most basic of questions.
I am looking to put the brackets up to hold my wall units in the kitchen.
I am following the guide from kitchensfitten.co.uk
It goes on to to say
Use at least a 2 1/2" x 10 screws
It seems that different websites and shops do things differently
firstly the I don't understand the size thing.
Secondly, it does not mention what type of screw.

- chipboard - twinhead - brass, zinc, stainless steel
They all refered to as 'wood screws' yet if I am putting the screw into a raw plug. Then why do I not see 'raw plug screws' for example ?
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

The 10 refers to the gauge, or width of the shank. The 2 1/2" is the length.
Screws are usually sold in metric sizes now. You want some of these, or similar: http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/cat.jsp?cId 31379&ts@475 Size 10 screws are 5mm shanks and you want 60mm length... http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/pro.jsp?ts@790&id 535
Si

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Mungo "Two Sheds" Toadfoot wrote:
Oh, and brown, as opposed to yellow/red/blue plastic wall/rawl plugs.
Si
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Rawl is a misuse of a brand name from the past. It basicly means the plastic screw plugs found in packets at all the DIY stores. Some are garbage and some are OK. Try to relate them to a known trade supplier. Avoid those that carry a trade name such as Homebase or B&Q. The packet you buy them in will tell you what size and length screw they are made for. Read the packet for the screw length and drill bit size they are made for. It is very important to use the correct drill bit size as the expansion of the plug is caused by using the corrct screw diameter (and correct length). When you are drilling--do not wobble the drill around--the egg shapped hole will severly reduce the amount of load you can hang on the screw. Hanging kitchen cabinets requires a great deal of reliability and care. For instance--if the cabinet door operator is a gentle person the factory specs may be OK for screw size.. If it is like my old girl--who always slams every door--double the spec size.
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JimP wrote:

... and present - see http://www.rawlplug.co.uk/ (which may be of interest to the OP).
--
Andy

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JimP wrote:

You can still get the fibre rawlplugs (Although who they're made by I don;t know). I still think they give a better grip than plastic, but then I'm an old fart.
See here:
http://www.toolfastdirect.co.uk/acatalog/Fibre_Rawlplugs.html
Cheers
Tim
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In an earlier contribution to this discussion,

I agree (with the grip bit - don't know about the fart! <g>) - but they're more fiddly to use, so I only use them for heavy duty stuff.
With plastic plugs, you just push them in and then screw the screw into them. Being tapered, they grip well enough not to twist in the hole as you do the screw up.
Fibre plugs, on the other hand, being parallel, do tend to twist unless you partially screw the screw in to expand them before inserting them. I always chamfer the bottom end, too, for good measure!
--
Cheers,
Set Square
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Set Square wrote:

And occasionally they do get too tight, especially with big screws, needing a little vaseline. Interestingly (or not!) I did find them very effective for light fixing into plasterboard, if hole is drilled for a tight fit before inserting screw.[1]
Interesting tip on chamfering - I must try that.
Cheers
Tim
[1] When plasterboard is dabbed onto blockwork, so cavity fixings don't work and the screw gauge is too little to get the length for fixing into the backing blockwork. Boy, do I hate plasterboard.
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Thank you to all those that have replied to my original question.
I know it's a simply question, but I've only been doing DIY about a year.
Besides I am sure this will help someone in the future.
But for me in summary if I understand
10 x 60mm 10 x 2 1/2"
is the same (ok no ruler near me but if we assume 60mm is 2 and a half inches) The 10 is a gauge, and although we now use MM rather than inches the 10 part is the same
By the way, I read that the gauge is taken from when screws were invented. So thats' why I am making this summary statement.
Correstions or agreement welcome
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Oh and forgot to add. With all that talk of SCREWS. I was thankful to see that someone told me what wall plugs to get
Just looked at screwfix, and they have some brown ones that take a screw gauge of 10-14. And use a No.7 drill bit.
I have a drill set, but might get a nice new one for this kitchen job
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Exactly right :)
Tim
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In an earlier contribution to this discussion,

This tends to happen if the screw is not fully threaded, and the plain shank enters the rawlplug. If you keep turning, the screw will shear. In such cases, you need to recess the plug down the hole a bit - so that only the threaded portion of the screw goes into it.
--
Cheers,
Set Square
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Tee first size is the length - sometimes specified in metric but often not. The second one is the guage - the bigger the number the thicker the screw. Most screws intended for heavy fixing will be 8 guage or thicker - with 8, 10, and 12 being the most popular.

These are as the name suggests designed to make screwing into chipboard simpler. They tend to tbe thinner with a very sharp point and a coarse thread. Not ideal for this task - but good for making stuff out of chipboard.

I expect you mean "Twinthread" - which as the name suggests has two interspaced threads cut into the screw. These are good general purpose screws well suited to power screw driving. The twin threads mean they screw in twice as quickly as a single thread (i.e. half the number of turns qre required) - they will grip and hold as well as a single thread screw, but are not able to "pull in" quite as hard as a single thread screw.
Twinthread are the type I use most often, and they would be well suited to the task.

Brass tend to be used where you want the screws to either look pretty, or you need additional corrosian resistance. Most modern screws will be zinc plated to stop them rusting. Stainless tend to be used in special cases where the greatest strength and corrosian resistance are required (like boat building for example).

You makes a certain amount of sense - but in fact plugs are almost always designed to take wood screws.
--
Cheers,

John.

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In an earlier contribution to this discussion,

This means a two and a half inch long screw, of size 10. The screw size refers to the diameter (though not directly in any measurement unit with which I am familiar). No 4 is a weedy little thing, and No 14 is prettty fat. Nos 6, 8 and 10 are the most common sizes used in DIY work.

Chipboard screws are fine. They are like 'ordinary' wood screws, but threaded all the way up to the head rather than having a plain shank.

You won't! A rawlplug is simply a device which enables you to use a woodscrew in brick, block or concrete. The screw screws into the soft material of the plug, and expands it so that it is a tight fit in the hole - enabling a firm fixing to be made.
--
Cheers,
Set Square
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I don't know if this was by accident or design but if you measure the head diameter of a woodscrew in 32nds of an inch and subtract 2 you end up with the screw size. E.g. a no. 8 woodscrew has a 5/16 in. dia. head
--
Mike Clarke

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Mike Clarke wrote:

I thought about that for a while - then my head started to hurt.
Dave
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Just to add a key piece of advice to what others have said, often mentioned in this newgroup, which is that if any plugs and/or screws have been provided with the brackets, dump 'em NOW! and buy some new plugs; and use the screw and masonry drill sizes specified on the plugs.
David
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

You can use woodscrews, chipboard screws, self tappers, twinthreads, plasterboard screws, or any other coarse thread screw. While there are some diffrences between them, none of the differences will stop them working fine with a rawlplug.
NT
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The OP said
"I have a drill bit set but......."
IMHE Drill bit sets for newbies usually contain HSS bits. What you will need for drilling bricks or blocks are masonry bits.
HTH
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snipped-for-privacy@connectfree.co.uk wrote:

unless theyre old soft bricks, in which case a carrot would do.
NT
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