Retrofit modern house with wood-burning stove - possible?

I'm reading all the latest doom and gloom from the oil markets as oil approaches $60 a barrel. I hate to think what the next 1,000 litres of heating oil is going to cost me.
Is it possible to fit a wood-burning stove into a house that currently has no chimney or flue? Web pages? Companies? I figure that there will always be some wood available somewhere, if oil and gas supplies dry up totally or become too expensive. Don't forget that the neocons have signed off on plans to bomb Iran in June. Not that they will definitely go ahead, but Bush is thinking of it. And I'm worried.
MM
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Can't be too hard, get some good concrete foundation, and build a free standing chimney next to an existing (cardboard) wall. A woodburner looks good in an inglenook, so thats all the living room of your modern house used up.
Rick
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MM wrote:

Sure it is. Most wood-burning-stove-suppliers will be happy to fit a suitable external chimbley; I believe the usual solution is a double-skinned stainless jobbie (dbl-skin is to let the inner skin get all toasty-warm to avoid too much gunge condensing on the way up). You're best off finding a local one (yell.co.uk/Yellow Pages, and o'course google.co.uk with the 'UK pagiz pliz' option selected), as they'll know what your local authority's pet likes and dislikes are.
Sometime this decade, we're after doing the same - and I do fancy the 'honest engineering' approach to stove construction of http://www.dowlingstoves.com / while a greenie friend swears by http://www.clearviewstoves.com /
Note that these are mfrs, rather than installers, but Clearview for one are big enuff that they're likely to have a local supplier who'll do installation for you. If you want to read up with the intention of d-i-y'ing it, I'd start with the mfrs websites to get a feel for the basic scope of the job. Doubtless, better-experienced advice will roll in here within the day...
Stefek
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Yep, should be. My parents put a solid fuel burning stove into their house (this would have been around 1978 ish) when they had a loft conversion done to convert the single floor cottage. You can get twinwall stainless steel flues that in principle don't seem that disruptive to install - my parent's ran up behind a false chimney breast, through the wall across the kitchen wall, through ceiling, and up through cupboard and through the roof.
--
Chris French, Leeds

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It is but have a look at an external wood burning water heater. This takes shredded wood from a hopper and automatically dumps it into the burner as needed to heat your water in the same way oil or gas wood. You need a reasonable sized outhouse but it takes up no room internally.
And despite all the glossy brochures, wood burning stoves always seem to end up both looking dirty and pouring out ash all over the floor.
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<snip>
reasonable sized outhouse but it takes up no room internally.

end
Very true ;)
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Clear skies grant available too!
Look carefully at the cost of wood, all wood's not the same, neither is the moisture content. I guess automatic stokers are worthwhile in the 50kW(t) sizes, smaller than that and you may consider a pellet stove, but make sure pellets are available locally. They may appear expensive at GBP150/tonne but in terms of calorific value they compare well with a pickup load of logs at 50 quid.

Yes and it's very hard to avoid dust throughout the room.
AJH
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MM wrote:

Definitely BUT to meet regs you need a fireporoof hearth with fire resistant backing amd a double insulated flue and stovepipe. These can be used without chimneys at all - the pipes themseves are safe for going through timber areas and up walls inisde or outside.
Not cheap though - couple of grand for a good stove AND chimney flues...and fitting
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wrote:

I don't think a couple of grand is all that expensive for the items you listed - including the fitting. It'll last practically for ever, won't it?
MM
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MM wrote:

Well, compared with 20 notes for a pliug and go 2Kw electric radiator thingie....
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The Natural Philosopher wrote:

You can also get flexible multi-fuel liners which are designed for multfuel stove use, these are cheaper than sectional ones but more generally applicable to lining an existing non-combustible flue. These are not cool to the touch, as they are double lined but dont have insulation.
See http://www.flues.co.uk /, they have lots of bits and are quite helpful (if you get to the right person!) and from what I remember are competive on price (not cheap tho!).
From memory, 2 years ago, I spent around 350 on the parts for an 8m long liner, adapter, top plate, and multi-fuel cowl.
IIRC Part J of the building regs covers this lot.
HTH,
Alex.
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AlexW wrote:

I THINK you are precluded from using flexible liners in anything other than a pre-existent flue constructed before 1970.
Certainly I was NOT allowed to use them on a wood burner or an aga in a new build three years ago. .

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The Natural Philosopher wrote:

> > Certainly I was NOT allowed to use them on a wood burner or an aga in a > new build three years ago. > . >
Worth checking. Possibly time for a phone call to building control by the OP?
My flue is, err, slightly older than that, and although I have seen this approach used in at least four other settings (some done "professionally" BTW) they were *all* in very old houses.
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You won't get all that lot for a couple of grand! Casting back further, if "all the gas and oil supplies dry up" I think you might find the wood's all gone rather suddenly too!
--
Bob Mannix
(anti-spam is as easy as 1-2-3 - not)
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On Mon, 11 Apr 2005 11:09:51 +0100, "Bob Mannix"

But at least wood grows again. Anyway, I like to be prepared. Actually, probably what I'll do is buy a house that already has an open fire.
MM
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MM wrote:

I am nort so sure on price. I think my flues were about 600 quid, and teh stove (highhlander) was a reclaim for free, but a small woodburner is available I suspect for less than a grand..ok the hearths were there alreasy as part of the build.
We fired it up when my wife was ill in bed - its in the bedroom. Extremely efficient - must have kicked out about 3kW just ticking over.

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wrote:

Oh, I have no doubts as to whether burning logs or coke produces a lot of warmth. I grew up in houses without any central heating and only open fires and/or an Aga. The thing that originally put me off having any open fires was the palaver my father went through each morning, cleaning out the grate, then laying a new fire. But when needs must... as they say, and the price of oil and gas doesn't look like it's going to go down.
Supposing one bought one of those small trailers for a car - Erde, I think they're called - surely there is enough dead wood around for free, just for the asking? Obviously I don't mean stealing fallen trees because they just happen to be lying on the ground somewhere, but I see so much fallen timber that obviously the owners have forgotten about, so a quick enquiry at the farmhouse might provide enough fuel for the winter for a few quid, or nothing at all. A chainsaw is all one needs.
MM
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Hi,
Stoves are more practical as the ash drops into a pan for emptying, and with a spare pan they can be used in rotation to save carrying a hop pan through the house or putting hot ashes in the bin. Also AFAIK wood ash is quite good for the garden.
Stoves can be reasonably cheap too for smaller ones or buying second hand can be a good way to get a lot of stove for the money.
I'd look into using a plain steel stove pipe which could be double skinned where it passes through floors and walls. 'Gas barrel' pipe from a steel stockholder is fairly inexpensive and can be had in a range of thicknesses.

Best to collect in spring then dry it out under cover for winter. Even if only used for part of heating or in mild weather it will help keep bills down. A 'maul' makes splitting logs quite easy, especially if they're dry.
cheers, Pete.
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Pete C wrote:

Our open wood burning gartes need emoptying of ash about once a month in winter, by which time we have a bin bag full.
The stove needs emtyoing every cole of sdays.
Why? because its siomply got less room for the ash.

A chainsaw is indeed all one needs.
Ther is no need to store under cover either. Not the whole logpile.
We take he very old landrover down to teh pile, cut enough for a week, and leave it in the land rover. Best mobile woodstore I know.
its dry enough - about 2 days worth copmes in and is stacked by teh fire whih dries it out in no time.
Wood burning though is voracious on logs. Far more volume of wood required than e.g. coal.

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wrote:

For splitting firewood? Nothing like splitting well seasoned logs with a maul on a crisp winter morning with a large mug of tea (to drink thatis!)

I tried that but the bugs under the damp bark would get uncomfortable and seek alternative accomodation :)
cheers, Pete.
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