Resin 'paving'.

I fancy doing some paving at the back of our house to replace some poorly laid concrete.
There are a couple of manholes at jaunty angles though and a soil pipe so I can see a lot of cutting and faffing so wondered about the resin stuff that I'm seeing advertised for drives.
Anyone got any opinion or experience? Is it DIYable?
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probably not allowed under current building regs. Surfaces like drives need to be permeable.
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from KT24 in Surrey, England
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wrote:

Pehaps worth sorting out the manholes - not as big a job as you may fear.
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On 10/01/2019 18:19, charles wrote:

That might apply to new builds but as a replacement for an existing concrete slab?
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On 10/01/19 18:19, charles wrote:

Maybe if you are doing one from scratch, but what if you are replacing one impermeable surface (concrete) by another (resin)? Is there a difference if the resin in laid on top of the concrete, or the concreter removed first and the resin laid on a prepared base? If the latter, do the base and resin have to be permeable?
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Never heard such a lot of twaddle. I think people would be forgiven for thinking that around these parts the national pastime during the summer is people out with their angle grinders laying their own drives and patios. Brian
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On Thursday, 10 January 2019 18:49:10 UTC, Jeff Layman wrote:

It's all bollix anyway. The permeable bit soon blocks up with moss and general crap.
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On 10/01/2019 18:19, charles wrote:

*or* have drains to a soakaway
*or* slope so that the rain drains onto the owner's land.
You absolutely CAN have any surface you like - you just have to make sure rain goes into the ground.
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On 10/01/2019 18:19, charles wrote:

Non-permeable surfaces are allowed, but they must drain to a soakaway.
SteveW
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You now need planning permission to install a non-permeable driveway, in order for the local water authority to be brought into the loop to confirm your plans for drainage are acceptable to them (e.g. soakaways have to be set well back from your boundary, and many gardens aren't big enough for that).
A recent new build near me had some interesting problems with this, as they didn't have enough garden left around the house to handle the rain water soaking in. Water authority made them install a giant underground grey water tank (which can be up to the boundary), and I believe the house has to use this for things like toilet flushing. It overflows into the street surface water drainage, but they are charged for doing that.
For the last several years, water authorities have the right to charge you for rain water run-off from your land. They've been going around all the commerical properties adding that levy to the water bill, but AFAIK haven't started on residential properties yet except when some relevant modification has taken place.
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On Fri, 11 Jan 2019 11:00:06 +0000, Andrew Gabriel wrote:

Note the above - the drive is not being done.

Its not the drive.

Its not the drive that is being done.
But for the OP I'd say that it would be better to hire a Stihl saw and cut the paving around the manholes if they cannot be easily repositioned more 'squarely'. The job will look a lot better.
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On 11/01/2019 11:30, Mark Allread wrote:

Whether its the drive is not the relevant bit. Any impermeable hard standing counts, regardless of if its a drive, patio, tennis court etc.
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On Fri, 11 Jan 2019 15:22:08 +0000, John Rumm wrote:

See:
https://www.planningportal.co.uk/info/200130/common_projects/44/ patio_and_driveway
extract: "Please note: different rules apply to paving over your front garden.
Elsewhere around your house there are no restrictions on the area of land which you can cover with hard surfaces at, or near, ground level.
However, significant works of embanking or terracing to support a hard surface might need a planning application.
If you live in a listed building, you will need listed building consent for any significant works whether internal or external.
Please note: The permitted development allowances described here apply to houses and not to:
Flats and maisonettes (view our guidance on flats and maisonettes) Converted houses or houses created through the permitted development rights to change use (as detailed in our change of use section) Other buildings Areas where there may be a planning condition, Article 4 Direction or other restriction that limits permitted development rights.
Also note that these rules only cover your Patio/Driveway." end extract
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On 11/01/2019 15:42, Mark Allread wrote:

Fairy snuff, I sit corrected!
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On Fri, 11 Jan 2019 21:42:58 +0000, John Rumm wrote:

:-) no worries.
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On 11/01/2019 15:42, Mark Allread wrote:

And there is this one.
https://goo.gl/maps/E1VHRmttLqj
Street view will take you back to 2009 and up to May 2018.
Every piece of garden is now concrete (trust me there has been more concrete laid since the May 2018 Streetview picture).
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wrote:

Fark, we don’t get anything like that sort of streetview history.
And I saw the google streetview camera car here almost a year ago now and it still hasn’t been updated. Something must have been comprehensively fucked with the system in the car or something.
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On 11/01/2019 11:30, Mark Allread wrote:

Would a 9 inch angle grinder do?
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On Fri, 11 Jan 2019 18:31:18 +0000, ARW wrote:

Never tried it with an angle grinder but I'm not sure you would get as good a finish on the 'cut' edge.
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On 10/01/2019 18:19, charles wrote:

The key phrase was 'back of our house'.
There is nothing in building regs to dictate what you can do in your back garden.
Only if your front garden (that leads onto a highway) slopes towards the road, are you supposed to install a drainage system to prvent surface water spilling onto the highway.
In my village I have seen at least 6 houses block pave their front garden and no attempt to provide drainage, by a company (pikey-sounding) who probably undercuts a local tradesman who does a proper job.
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