Replacing fluorescent tube with LED



After we moved, I went round the house and tallied up the fittings, then threw away all the bulbs we had no use for (actually, I gave them back to to the people who bought our house, since they had the appropriate fittings and I can't bear to throw away perfectly functional "stuff".) When the end of filament bulbs was announced, I stocked up. Totally unnecessarily as it turns out, since they're still widely available, and we had loads left over.
Annoyingly, I've just had to buy some R63 spotlight bulbs for our study, since I hated the CFLs in there and couldn't find a good LED equivalent. They're about the only incandescent bulbs left in the house.
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On 2017-12-08, Huge wrote:

Yes, I think I posted here years ago asking for recommendations for good, bright R63 CFLs, but you guys confirmed that no-one made any over "60 W equivalent".
I had to rip out the false drop ceiling in the kitchen a couple of years ago because of a loose screw terminal in a junction box buried in the real ceiling, but one long-term benefit (apart from a bit more storage space on top of the cupboards) was getting rid of the last 4 R63 fittings in the house.
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Yes, one of the problems with modern light bulbs is that they have various different fittings - large bayonet, small bayonet, large edison screw, small edison screw. And some CFLs and LEDs are only made with one fitting, so you need to change your fitting (or get an adaptor which increases the overall length).
My previous house had been a show house for the development and so all the light fittings were supplied with the house. And almost every fitting used a different type of bulb, so I needed to keep a stock of candle bulbs (SBC and SES), conventional bulbs (LBC and LES) and *low-voltage* mini-spotlight - the bathroom, the hall, the landing and the kitchen all had transformers in the loft to power 12V spotlights (ie not mains-powered GU10 bulbs). Most shops stocked GU10 bulbs, but not many stocked the similarly-sized 12V equivalent.
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wrote:

Me too.

Mine certainly will given that I don’t use them anymore.
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Adam Funk wrote:

I found them annoyingly slow starting on outdoor PIRs, so swapped them to LED before they died.
The only CFLs here now are in the loft, where usage is so infrequent they'll effectively last forever, but I have a handful of the 10p supermarket 'giveaways' as spares.
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On 2017-12-07, Andy Burns wrote:

They do have a noticeable start-up, especially in cold weather, but I find them good enough for getting to the worm bin or the shed (which has a better light inside) in the evening. I'd rather put up with that outside occasionally than inside frequently (until I use up the CFL stock).
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If all you're doing is using a light for a very short time, does how much energy it uses really matter?
Probably why so many CFLs end up lighting cupboards, etc.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On 2017-12-08, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

Not so much energy use as:
1. using up the stock of CFLs;
2. not being left in the dark by a failure (incandescents just stop working completely; CFLs usually get dim before they fail)
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We've got daylight CFLs (mostly 25W or 30W, equivalent to about 150W or 175W tungsten) in wax-paper lampshades on pendant fittings in several of the bedrooms to provide general room lighting; likewise for the hall and landing lights. I find for single-fitting ceiling lights, CFL provide a much brighter light. For rooms where multi-bulb fittings are available, a group of LEDs provides enough light.
My bedside light and my wife's (*) bedside and pendant ceiling lights are coloured Philips Hue, as are some of the GU10 mini-spotlights in the kitchen and bathroom, with white versions (2800-6500 K) in the remaining GU10 fittings in those rooms. We also have an LED strip light (a flexible clear strip with LEDs embedded all along its length) under the wall cupboards to illuminate the worktops.
These are supplemented by a dimmable tungsten photoflood uplighter in the dining table part of the living room, and by a conventional 3x tungsten-candle-bulb ceiling fitting in the centre of the living room; the latter has a mixture of 60W conventional tungsten and 40W halogen tungsten bulbs (the 60W are replaced by 40W halogen as they fail).
We've got the Philips Hue bulbs controlled by a Hue hub from an Android app and an Amazon Alexa voice control; this also controls a switchable 3-pin plug for the photoflood uplighter so we can ask Alexa to turn on "downstairs" (living room uplighter, kitchen 5x GU10 fitting and kitchen worktop LED strip) or "living room" (just the switchable plug for the uplighter).
My wife has a dimmable LED-array desk light in her study and I have an ancient U-shaped fluorescent tube (warm white) desk lamp in my study - the sort of tube that has a flash-flash-on bimetallic starter in the fluorescent tube base.
The LEDs on "concentrate" setting and the CFLs appear to the human eye to be fairly close to cloudy daylight, though to a digital camera on fixed white balance setting rather than auto-white-balance, the LEDs appear fairly warm compared with the CFLs which the camera sees as white when on its cloudy-daylight setting; the LEDs appear white on the camera's warm-white-fluorescent setting if they are on "concentrate" or else as white on the camera's tungsten bulb setting if they are on the "reading" setting which looks slightly warmer (though still less orange than a tungsten bulb) to the human eye. In other words, a camera sees the LEDs as warmer than the human eye when compared to daylight or to tungsten bulbs. The auto-white setting on the camera seems to sort it all out very well: the days of any fluorescent light reproducing as sickly green went out with the demise of slide film.
I did some comparison photos of a makeshift colour chart, with the camera white-balanced under various lights, and the results are fairly consistent apart from a slight dulling of reds under LED and, to a lesser extent, CFL:
https://s33.postimg.org/6f2cuf5fz/daylight.jpg - illuminated by daylight in the shade (ie not direct sunlight)
https://s33.postimg.org/7hcjcyvz3/daylight_CFL.jpg - illuminated by "daylight" CFL
https://s33.postimg.org/500s5own3/Led.jpg - illuminated by "cool white" GU10 LED
https://s33.postimg.org/hreyc7tkf/white_fluor.jpg - illuminated by "white" 4-foot fluorescent tubes
(in all of the above, I white-balanced the camera from a sheet of A4 printer paper illuminated by the relevant light source)
https://s33.postimg.org/4n9dzi6nj/white_fluor_daylight_WB.jpg - same fluorescent tubes, with camera on "cloudy" daylight setting, showing that it is fairly warm compared with daylight
The red plastic box of screws (left of the face in the photos) was a fairly vibrant red which is a bit dull in the artificial light. The blue box of drills was dark royal blue. As expected, both of these have reproduced most faithfully in shady daylight
(*) I snore, so we tend to sleep in separate rooms - mostly :-)
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On 06/12/2017 21:39, Adam Funk wrote:

Everywhere apart from the front outside light that I cannot see been bettered by an LED, the rear outside light that will be LED as soon as I drop on a spare at work:-), and the loft light (that can keep it's crappy CFL and I have a few spares).
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Adam

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On Tue, 5 Dec 2017 18:19:25 +0000

Only the very top of the tube is emitting light that will be obstructed by the tube on reflection. Obviously reflection is not 100%, and is diffuse, but you're not losing half the light.
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Of course not. Ever seen an LED car headlamp without a reflector?
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On Wed, 06 Dec 2017 11:15:36 +0000 (GMT)

Eh?
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What was there before? Maybe it was some form of multiple light fitting. Brian
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You can get led tubes that replace just the old fluoro tube.

Nope, that would be too sensible.

Someone wants easy access to the terminal blocks in future.

Its actually the reverse, regardless of how it looks.
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