8ft Fluorescent tube options ..

Our lounge is lit by 2x8ft fluorescent tubes. After 15 years (and they
weren't new when we moved in !) one has packed up.
Looking at prices and alternatives, I see you can get LED replacements
which (AFAICT) are direct plugins.
Given fluoros are quite low power anyway, what's the groupthink on this ?
Replace with LED (and is there a recommended make ?) or stay old-school,
and just get a new tube ?
I have swapped the two over (there is a slight tension when waving an 8ft
tube around) and it's 100% the tube. Not starter or ballast.
Reply to
Jethro_uk
Jethro_uk wrote in news:oj0f2n$ejo$ snipped-for-privacy@dont-email.me:
8ft tubes are obsolete - but you may find some in stock. Replace them with new tubes until alternatives are cheaper.
Reply to
DerbyBorn
Didn't know that ... but with an expected life of > 15 years, future availability isn't too pressing.
One thing I am wary of is my initial experience with plug-in LED replacements (GU10s) all failed within a year. To be fair the second set I was sent have lasted.
Reply to
Jethro_uk
unusual
really?
There isn't much advantage of LEDs over 8' tubes. 8 footers are the most efficient of them all. Get another triphosphor tube if you can find one.
NT
Reply to
tabbypurr
I think mine turned out to be the capacitor, but then its only there to do clever power facctor stuff, but no good if it goes short!
I'd imagine the led would be more efficient but if you are going to change them do both as colour temperature and warm up times will be different. Brian
Reply to
Brian Gaff
Also of course its usually the power supply bit that goes on direct replacements and I suspect those are made to a price, low price! Luckily I seldom use lights unless somebody is around but my old dual 4ft Thornes are still Ok but the ballasts hum a little after all these years. Brian
Reply to
Brian Gaff
I bought three from TLC a few months back (in fact I bought two, broke one installing it, and then got another!)
Reply to
John Rumm
In article ,
The chances of bodged technology like a LED replacement for a florrie tube lasting 15 years are, I'd say, remote. Different (perhaps) if a custom designed LED fitting.
Also the light quality won't be the same. Only you can decide if that matters.
Reply to
Dave Plowman (News)
Dave Plowman (News) wrote on 28/06/2017 :
That depends on the actual LED's, some do provide a better quality of light, especially than a 100Hz flickering tube.
I do wonder at anyone using 8' foot tubes in a living room.
Reply to
Harry Bloomfield
A LED tube is likely to flicker too. Some have smoothing capacitors in, but not very big ones.
I am going to install some flexible strips in aluminium extrusions in my conservatory, I may even try some as up lighters in the lounge and kitchen if they are OK.
Reply to
dennis
In article ,
Can't say I've ever noticed flicker from a decent florrie. But do know some claim to.
LEDs never seem to match the light quality from anything else. Whether that is better or not is down to the individual.
Does seem an odd choice.
Reply to
Dave Plowman (News)
It was like that when we bought it. Both lounge and main bedroom have no lights in ceilings. The lounge has 2 8ft tubes - on above each window.
Reply to
Jethro_uk
dennis@home brought next idea :
I have a 5' tube/fitting mounted on top of some kitchen cupboards as supplementary lighting acting as an uplighter, for when more light is needed, but the main lighting is all LED. It works rather well, bouncing light from the ceiling. I notice flicker from flourescents, but none at all from the multitude of LED's I have fitted.
Reply to
Harry Bloomfield
The LED strips are 12V DC so as long as its a decent PSU there will be no low frequency flicker.
The LED tubes don't usually have much of PSU in them so they have a 50/100Hz flicker. The internal supply can be 100s of volts depending on how many LEDs they string in series.
The strips I have purchased have 5050 RGBW LEDs on them and a cheap IR remote. The aluminium extrusions and covers cost more.
Reply to
dennis
In article ,
Most decent florries have used high frequency ballasts for a very long time now. Higher efficiency, longer tube life - and no flicker.
The most efficient way to drive an LED is much the same - high frequency pulses.
Reply to
Dave Plowman (News)
I have had quite a lot of LED failures - may be lower power usage - but not looking like it will save any money
Reply to
rick

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