Removing tree stump?

Best way? Its more like a large plant (castor oil plant) but its pretty large.
Tried to dig around but the roots seem well spread. Is it a case or suck it up and dig it out or can I kill it somehow and wait for it to die off?
Tried the commerical stump killer stuff in the past - useless...
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paulfoel wrote:

I'd dig as much as I could, chopping roots off as far as possible, then hitch a strop to the Landrover and pull it out.
If I couldn't get the Landrover in, I'd rig the Hi-lift jack up to winch it out.
Otherwise, simple diggin' 'n cuttin' and brute force .. ;)
A chain saw might help ...
--
Paul - xxx
Mark cavendish Danny Hart
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On 11/03/2012 15:33, Paul - xxx wrote:

Cheap wood chisel bit in an SDS drill is a very effective way of severing roots below ground level. With enough of the roots cit, it becomes a much easier job.
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paulfoel wrote:

Patience and muscle. Preferably of the 50bhp digger sort.
ring the plant first, cutting any lateral roots, then go under and break the taproot if it has one.
Rope it and drag it out.
--
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On 11/03/2012 5:27 PM, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

I had to remove a number of old privet hedges (50 yrs +) they had huge roots, ended up using a chain winch, with fixed end attached via a long lifting strap to a convenient telegraph pole.
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On Sun, 11 Mar 2012 06:48:58 -0700 (PDT), paulfoel

Angle grinder.
Fein Multimaster.
--
Frank Erskine

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Frank Erskine wrote:

Dynamite!
JGH
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On Sun, 11 Mar 2012 16:24:42 -0700 (PDT), jgharston

B&Q are fresh out of it...
--
Frank Erskine

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jgharston wrote:

OOOh yes, the possibilities for harm are almost endless ...
--
Paul - xxx
Mark cavendish Danny Hart
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On Sun, 11 Mar 2012 16:24:42 -0700, jgharston wrote:

Ooohhh - that brings back memories of tales from Dad.
They had a large old tree in the middle of what had been a former hedgeline and they wanted it out. Various options were suggested but then one of the lads 'knew a pal' who could get some 'left over' dynamite.
They over calculated apparently and the tree show up on the air and back down in exactly the same spot.
I never did discover just what happened after that.
David
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We had a chap come and blow some stumps out at RHS Wisley, around 1989, they didn't allow stump gobblers because of the risk of fungal pathogens, and he successfully lifted about three big ones but had an extra stick of explosive left, so he doubled up on the last one. I saw the dull red glow followed by the stump breaking up and the loud crump. One smallish piece tumbled over in the air toward me and the tropical greenhouse. It came over in such a lazy arc that I thought I would easily field it but when it hit the ground about 50 m between me and the site of the blast I was amazed, I could barely pick it up.
The curator insisted on excavators after that.
It was about this time I made the stump burner with an old vacuum which was successful in some circumstances. Now I have a 1kW igniter for a woodchip boiler that I suspect would work better but with stump gobbles being widespread now there's not much need.
AJH
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On Sun, 11 Mar 2012 18:40:46 +0000, Frank Erskine

A reciprocating saw with long narrow woodsaw blade is quite good for this if you don't have access to the heavy duty stuff.
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On 11/03/2012 13:48, paulfoel wrote:

Stump grinder. Messy but effective.
Colin Bignell
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On Sun, 11 Mar 2012 06:48:58 -0700 (PDT), paulfoel
Burn it out. Splash with cheapo vegetable oil to make it more flammable. May take quite a few application but it will remove pretty much all stumps - or reduce them to easily removed ashes anyway.
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Simon Cee wrote:

Doesn't work unless its well old and dried out.
to be honest, get a new chain and sharpening file for the chainsaw and expect it to be wreked when you are finished, and just carve it up
There are so many ways to do it but none do not involve hard physical effort and/or expense.
Personally at the cheap end a pick spade and saw are perfectly usable.
Up at the top end you have diggers and stump grinders
I tend to save all these jobs until I have a digger onsite - its the best way to totally clear ground, followed by rotovating or ploughing.
I have burned stumps out but they were very old and dry.
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wrote:

Just attack it with a hammer and an old wood chisel, half an hour work with same demolished a 10" stump in my lawn last year.
I have ground down bigger stumps with an electric chainsaw. I re-fitted an old chain and used a "G" clamp as a second handle on the end of the bar. That soon ground down 3 bigger stumps that had been cut off just 4 or 5 inches above ground. They were all in lawn, I wasn't bothered about removing them completely, just ground them down and turfed over.
Mike
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On Mon, 12 Mar 2012 14:31:43 +0000, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

Burning out stumps was the standard way of clearing land for farming here back in the day, at least for stumps that were too big to pull out with horses straight off. I think I recall reading somewhere that it could take a couple of weeks per stump, though - not a "light a fire for a few hours" kind of thing.

Yes, that's the way I've done it in the past, at least for stumps where the trunk was up to a foot in diameter. Anything larger and I'd go for powered equipment, renting if necessary, I think.
cheers
Jules
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The Natural Philosopher wrote

I used a full road grader myself.
The crowd I hired stuff like that from was run by one hell of a woman who when I asked them to clear the site before building, said that the road grader was the best thing to do that with. She was right.
Corse that was the first house in a new subdivision so there werent any fences etc at that time. Not viable otherwise.

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On Mon, 12 Mar 2012 14:31:43 +0000, The Natural Philosopher

Ah, you may well be right as they're what I've used it on.
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On 13/03/2012 19:07, Simon Cee wrote:

Just revisiting this thread as I think I might have another crack at my ancient cherry stump (which is indeed 'well old and dried out', and full of splits and cracks) this weekend. I'm sure getting the timber impregnated with something burny has to help... what's the deal with veg oil? Do you apply it and then start the fire straightaway or do you keep sloshing over a period of time and then burn?
Thanks David
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