Remove wooden fence post 'stub'.



Wow.
--
Today is Boomtime, the 57th day of Chaos in the YOLD 3184
Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Brian Reay wrote:

Thermite mixture? :-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Break up the concrete using the expansion characteristics of quicklime?
I've never done it, but AIUI you drill some decent sized holes* down into the concrete, fill them with quicklime and tamp it down a bit, pour in some water, plug the hole with a bit of broom handle or whatever, and leave it to do its thing. Or just plug the hole without adding the water and let the quicklime hydrate from the ambient moisture. As the quicklime hydrates it expands, relentlessly, and eventually splits the concrete or rock it's in.
Google throws up several links to commercial expansive mortars and patents, the latter seem to be based on quicklime with other additives, e.g. http://www.freepatentsonline.com/4565579.html .
But quicklime is nasty stuff. You need to take care when handling it not to get it on your skin and definitely not in your eyes as it's potentially very caustic. It also gets hot and may boil in the hole, so take care to avoid it splashing and spitting out onto you.
*what's a decent size? Don't know, but getting on for a couple of cm diameter I guess. SDS drill? Mind you, if you've done that, the concrete might be easy enough to break up by hand.
--

Chris

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 26 Feb 2018 18:33:00 +0000 (GMT+00:00), jim <k> wrote:

Builders' merchant or a firm that supplies lime mortar?
--

Chris

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Brian Reay wrote:

I don't know if you want to get the lump out of the ground, but I got one out by rolling it around (I was able to stick a scaffold pole I'd found buried in the garden into the hole), and pushing soil underneath it as it was moving about. Didn't take very long.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 26/02/2018 12:07, Brian Reay wrote:

Let the lorry diver fix it.
--
Adam

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 26/02/18 12:07, Brian Reay wrote:

If you can drill a 50mm hole (long Auger?) then a short length of scaffold pole could sit in it, and then you'd hollow out the new post to conceal that.
Alternatively, one of these might get the wood out, after mushing with various chemicals.
https://www.manomano.co.uk/auger-1747?model_id 98729
--
Adrian C

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
<snip> >Drilling and breaking it up.

<snip>
That's what I did (and have another to do).
I fitted a 20mm Forstner bit to a long extension (or two) and then chain drilled a row of holes across the middle of the stub.
Then I did the same across the stub to form a cross.
Then I drilled diagonally though each hole to break each hole into the next (the Forstner bit seemed less keen to bind than most and could be 'steered' easier, even when fairly deep in a hole and were quite strong in general), and the Henry used to keep the wood chips out so you could see what you were doing.
I think I finished the breaking though off with a long Saber then panel saw and was then was able to compress the sides in and pull the stub out (a screw eye, rope and a long lever over the old post top laid over the hole).
That's probably how I'm going to do the remaining one (to be replaced by steel posts in the same holes).
Cheers, T i m
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, 26 February 2018 12:07:12 UTC, Brian Reay wrote:

You can buy a short "repair" spike for this very purpose intended to be hammered into the wooden remanants. https://www.ironmongerydirect.co.uk/product/powapost-fence-post-repair-spike-twin-bolt-75mm-162275?vat=1&shopping=true&gclid IaIQobChMI89bNjNHF2QIVirftCh2rsQDyEAQYAiABEgJNEPD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

My 2p's worth of advice would be to drill into the wooden stub and screw in the largest eye bolt you can find (something like a shield anchor perhaps which will expand). Then after loosening the soil around the concrete as be st you can use the broken post with a hole at one end with a rope through t he hole/eye bolt to act as a lever to pull out the concrete stub. Might nee d some jigging but this worked for me (I did have a few inches of broken po st above the concrete so I was able to drill a hole to thread the rope). Ot her advantage is that your hole isn't much bigger than the original as you' ve not had to dig out the concrete.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Why not I have always found them to be stronger than the wooden post.
I have often broken the concrete with an sds and then levered it out but if the concrete is as good as you say why not use the metpost with a square base and resin bond the fixings to the existing concrete.
I have also removed the wood and hammered a modified met post into the socket. I have not been successful burning the wood out but it may be possible with a cheap hot air gun like the Einhell I light my fire with.
Personally I would never concrete or postfix a wooden post in, they seem to rot faster.
AJH
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, February 26, 2018 at 12:07:12 PM UTC, Brian Reay wrote:

FWIIW my idea would be to drill a large diameter hole in the centre of the post say a 1" auger or the like and use a coarse threaded rod which cuts only into the sides of the timber because the shaft of the threaded rod is loose within the hole. Put a couple of nuts on the rod for grip and pull i t out with a jack or the like. Wait till a dry day and put in a hair drier for a few hours first to get the MC down as much as possible . Alternatively, if time is not of essence, drill lots of holes and introduc e a bit of dry or wet rot on a bed of malt agar. It will only take a year o r so! If time is of essence the idea of burning out with an oxidising agent is pe rfect. When putting back the timber replacement soak the pointed end grain to go i n the hole in an organic solvent borne fungicide for a day two, let it dry, sleeve it with plastic and then drypack with 1:1 fine sharp sand and cemen t around the perimeter of the new wood which should be slightly smaller in diameter to allow for this. Alternatively, use the same size, coat it in a n epoxy resin and ram it home !
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bite the bullet, dig it out from one side and break it up. When you replace it use heavy gauge steel box section with a rain cap. If that gets damaged it can be straightened/repaired or cut off and a new piece welded on.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.