Radiator valve mystery

I have a radiator I'd like to remove while decorating. At one end it has a thermostatic valve, at the other end a plain valve (if that's what you call it?). The plain one has a plastic cap that removes easily, revealing this -
http://i.imgur.com/bH2il3H.jpg
I.e. there is a brass thing with a hexagonal head that I think I'm to turn clockwise with a spanner until it won't move, shutting off the valve.
If that's right so far, what if anything is the purpose of the screw in the middle of the brass thing? It's a bit blurry in the picture, but it seems to be the head of a screw that goes into the axis of the brass thing.
Should I attempt to loosen or tighten the screw, or remove it, or just pretend it's not there?
Thanks
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I think the screw is so that the valve can be either the lock-shield valve that it is now or a normal, non-thermostatic, radiator valve if you attach a hand turnable know to the shaft using the screw.
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Chris Green
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I think the thing that would shut off the valve is the screw you can see inside what you have shown - and it's presumably currently set to be open a bit to let just the right amount of water through the radiator.
The big hexagonal nut you refer to should already be turned fully clockwise - if you were to turn it anticlockwise it would start to leak and eventually, if turned far enough, the valve mechanism would come apart
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On 15/03/2015 17:34, Murmansk wrote:

Yes, indeed. The big nut is what holds the valve together, and is not adjustable. So turn it off by turning the screw clockwise. Just in case the system has been balanced, and the valve has been set in a particular partly open position, note how many turns (and fraction of a turn) it takes to close it, so that you can put it back to the same state.
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Thinking of the other end of the radiator, beware of just turning the therm ostatic valve to the off position and taking the radiator off - if it gets really cold in the room the valve could open and let water out. You need to take the head off the valve and put on a cap in its place which will push down the pin in the valve mechanism to fully seal the valve.
Be aware that once you have isolated both ends of the radiator, it'll be ve ry heavy and full of water, which will need to be drained out - and that th e water will probably be horribly dirty and capable of staining your carpet s etc
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You would think, by now some bright spark would have designed swivelable pipe connectiors so the radiator could be made horizontal while decorating. Brian
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On 15/03/2015 18:32, Brian Gaff wrote:

That'd be your plastic pipe, elbow at the valve pipe connectors, and pipe round the back of the skirting, down and under the floor.
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On 15/03/2015 18:32, Brian Gaff wrote:

The connections on any value allow it to be positioned horizontal.
This is effectively what this youtube demonstration shows - but then it goes on to to show removing the radiator without first draining it.
<
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ru-nNFqBzqk

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On 15/03/2015 18:32, Brian Gaff wrote:

The problem is not the pipe connectors, but the brackets that take the weight of the radiator. The radiator needs to be lifted off those.
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Nick wrote:

Is the thing even connected? it looks suspiciously like a break in the pipe going through the floor.
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Looks more like insulation coming up thru the floor to me.
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Rod Speed wrote:

May be
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F Murtz wrote:

Ps I was not talking about the obvious bit of insulating material
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On 16/03/2015 09:34, F Murtz wrote:

Difficult to see clearly because the important bits are not in focus. [The camera must have had a very small depth of focus because the flaking paint is wonderfully sharp!]
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I have never seen one with a slotted screw. Are you sure it isn't a broken off shaft that lookes like a screw slot?
Most "lockshield" valves are ordinary valves but with a cap rather than a knob.
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I don't think I've seen one on a radiator, but it looks the same idea as a gas restrictor valve, commonly used to supply a gas fire in a fireplace.

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Andrew Gabriel
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On 16/03/2015 15:33, Andrew Gabriel wrote:

I've seem something similar where the hexagonal nut locks the central shaft - release the hexagonal nut half a turn or so to allow the screw to turn and once adjusted tighten the nut again.
Is that lead pipe coming out of the floor?
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On Mon, 16 Mar 2015 14:16:52 +0000, DerbyBorn wrote:

You should get out more! :) My c1975 c/h is fitted with them:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/t1iwumq5z4kul0f/Lockshield.jpg?dl=0
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Good heavens. I had the twinfast double entry valves where the lockshield was a screw under a brass cap. Never seen the type you are showing though.
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Other radiators here follow the same pattern, so I'm pretty sure it's a screw slot, yes.
Since posting, I attempted to turn the brass thing, which was very stiff, with a 15mm spanner. I couldn't move it clockwise but it did turn a little anti-clockwise, but then water came out so I hastily turned it back as hard as I could, I think back to where it started. Fortunately, no more water so far.
I can't shift the screw at all. The radiator still gets warm so I don't think I made any net change to the valve.
Thanks for all the other replies so far.
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