QUIET ceiling switch?

The ceiling switch in my bathroom is as noisy as hell. Pull the cord to turn on the light and it makes a very loud "kerching" noise. No, you can't have a better description! :)
During the day it's not so bad, you get used to it, but at night it can wake up my son who sleeps in the room next to the bathroom.
So, who makes a switch thats quiet? I've been in to my local branch of CEF and tried thiers and I've been to the sheds. They all seem noisy. (The current one is a Wikes own brand and nearly new). Is it inherent in the design of the switchgear?
Thanks for any pointers.
--
Regards from Mike Barnard
South Coast, UK.
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there is but sorry cant for the life of me find a link someone on here will have it im sure..

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On Sun, 06 Feb 2005 16:21:36 +0000, Mike Barnard
The Legrand ceiling switches are fairly quiet. There is the dimmable pull switch available from <http://www.tlc-direct.co.uk that is silent but isn't just a on\off switch.
--

SJW
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Mike Barnard wrote:

Depends on how quiet you want it...
I used on of these recently:
http://www.tlc-direct.co.uk/Products/CM2781.html
And it is much quieter than many, it gives a single click when pulled rather than the more common "click clack" type of action.
If you want silent, then you may need to look at one of the pull cord dimmers.
--
Cheers,

John.

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I hate the b***dy things and would replace it with a wall one outside the bathroom - if necessary.
However, IIRC, TLC do a dimmer version which is silent in operation - and suitable for loads up to 250 watts of mains or LV, but not obviously any type of low energy or fluorescent.
Its part number is TL PCD51 and costs 17.99 + vat.
--
*I started out with nothing... and I still have most of it.

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

A kindred spirit! My builder looked at me very oddly when I said I wanted the bathroom light switches outside on the wall, but I was paying, so he shrugged and did it.
I can live with the remote possibility of somebody accidentally (or deliberately) turning off the lights while I'm in there, if it means avoiding those horrible dangly bits of string :-)
--
Tony

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But can you live with the admittedly lowish risk that someone with really wet hands (or the person who follows them) gets a belt from the switch ?
Maybe it's because I have childhood memories of getting a shock from a light switch in my parents' kitchen.
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brugnospamsia wrote:

Well, to be honest, yes I can. First of all, that's true of any switch in a room with a basin or sink (like a kitchen, or a utility room), but mainly I don't subscribe to the "remove every tiny weeny bit of risk from life" view - IMHO, it's what has allowed Part P into our lives.

Everyone is entitled to their own view. I'm not wishing to criticise you at all - but if you bought my house, I'm afraid you'd have to move the bathroom light switches :-)
--
Tony

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But can you live with the admittedly lowish risk that someone with really wet hands (or the person who follows them) gets a belt from the switch ?
Maybe it's because I have childhood memories of getting a shock from a light switch in my parents' kitchen.
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Where IMHO it is more likely. But no regs about cord switches.
I also wonder about the health aspects of those cord thingies.
--
*The first rule of holes: If you are in one, stop digging!

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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Bolt one of theose external weatherproof switches to the wall :-)
I lived in Germany for a while, where they have a lot of rules, and the light switch in the bathroom was a regular switch next to the open unswitched power outlet. It was open 'cos the washing machine was plugged in at the other end of the bathroom.
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brugnospamsia wrote:

outside the

wanted
so he

means
really
switch ?
So what about the light switch for the bedroom next to the bathroom? It's just as likely that someone coming out of the bathroom with wet hands could get a belt from there.
MBQ
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I hadn't thought of that since my house isn't laid out that way, but I will now have to give some thought to making all the lights in my house operable with no risk of electric shock :-)
Maybe it's cos I'm about to hit 45 and I live alone, but since I'm completely overhauling my house, it seems foolish not to make it as safe as possible ....
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

There is a kind of implied assumption made in the regs that the bathroom will be fitted with a suitable extraneous conductivity elimination device. called a "towel" in some parts ;-)
--
Cheers,

John.

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Tony Eva wrote:

outside the

eek.
Try hanging a heavy cast aluminium light pull from the 'dangly bit of string' to make the newly refurbed bathroom look nice & finished off.
Cue my girlfriend shaking out a towel in there and getting the end caught up in the string, whipping the aforementioned light pull into just underneath her eye giving her a big shiner.
Pleased she was not :-0 !!
Cheers,
Paul.
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I'm the same way and did exactly that in my last house.,
However, in some cases, it may now even be permissible to put them on the wall inside the bathroom. Unfortunately, this isn't the case on my new house (too proximate to the bath), so it will gain an outside switch at some point...
Christian.
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On Mon, 07 Feb 2005 12:41:44 +0000, Christian McArdle wrote:

Would it be permissable to use a water proof wall switch (the sort with a membrane over the rocker) in a bathroom (I forget the definition of zone 1,2 etc, but on the wall by the door within 1m of the bath and basin but 2m from the shower)? Not as pretty though...
Tim
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On Mon, 07 Feb 2005 13:16:27 +0000, Tim S wrote:

Though I just thought that perhaps such a switch isn't actually totally waterproof, or at least the metal clad box it fits isn't. I've only seen them fitted outside but protected from direct rain, in for example, a porch and under a car port.
A full monty waterproof switch would be fairly ugly (unless you like the bathroom looking like the inside of a submarine).
Question still stands though with provisos.
Tim
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If you were really concerned, a low voltage coil stepping relay would be one answer. Or perhaps an isolating transformer in the lighting feed to that room.
--
*Rehab is for quitters

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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Tim S wrote:

You can use an ordinary switch in Zone 3 - i.e. more than 600mm from the nearest edge of the bath or shower tray. Switchgear closer to the bath than that needs to be SELV, not exceeding a nominal 12 V AC (or 30V DC).
--
Andy

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