Plasterboarding Stud Wall

Just about to start plaster boarding my new stud wall. I have the non tapered edge plasterboard. Do I just butt the sheets up against each other and scrim tape over the joints in preperation for skimming?
TIA
Richard
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snipped-for-privacy@btinternet.com wrote:

leave 1/4 - 1/2" gaps, the plaster squishes thru and bonds them together. Otherwise the joints jhust crack.
NT
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     snipped-for-privacy@meeow.co.uk writes:

If you have any bonding coat plaster, use that to squish through the gaps. Probably not worth buying it specially for this though -- finish coat or plaster board plaster works too, but don't make the gaps too big in that case. Then scrim tape over before skimming.
BTW, no gaps required where both edges of the ajoining boards are screwed to the same timber, only where they are floating across studs.
--
Andrew Gabriel

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snipped-for-privacy@meeow.co.uk wrote:

Or use the sticky open weave (glass?) tape to tape the joints, which is equally as good.
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... a.k.a. scrim tape.
The gap allows the boards to be bonded. The scrim tape stops the plaster falling away if there is any movement -- you just get a hairline crack which will be easily filled with paint. It won't bond the boards together by itself though -- you still have to do that.
--
Andrew Gabriel

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snipped-for-privacy@btinternet.com wrote:

Yup...
Most people go for the vertical positioning of the PB since in many houses it reaches the ceiling. A better way (IMHO) is to do it horizontally (you position the noggins across the middle to match a board width from the floor). That way you can stagger the boards top and bottom which gives a slightly more rigid wall.
You don't have to make the joins a perfect fit, since there is no harm in the skim getting a little extra "key" into any gaps.
I use the bugal head drywall screws on a 400 x 400mm spacing (assuming the studs are on 400mm centres that is!). One of the drywall screwdriver bits (i.e. with the shroud) works well - especially in a magnetic bit holder. They are quite a shallow screw pitch, so you can spin them in with the drill on high speed as well I find.
--
Cheers,

John.

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Thanks again! :)
One more thing:
Where I have made the stud wall I had to rip down all the old lath and plaster from the ceiling where the head plate went and around it. It was in terrible condition big cracks blown and just waiting to drop on my head, In fact most of my upstairs is like that. I plan to just plasterboard over in other rooms after looking like a chimney sweep for a couple of days!
The problem I have now is that one part of the new stud wall is running parallel with the ceiling joists. When I come to plasterboard the ceiling I'm worried that there will be nowhere to screw the plasterboard edge too, the nearest joist that I can screw to is about 350mm away. Will this provide enought rigidity? (if thats a word) failing that should I attach a strip of wood to the head plate which I can screw into through the plasterboard, or could I just leave a gap around the top when I board the walls which will allow the ceiling plasterboard to rest on the edge. The run where I have this problem is not that long, about 4ft.
What to do?
TIA
Cheers
Richard
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     snipped-for-privacy@btinternet.com writes:

Normally, you recess some noggins and use them to support an extra dummy joist bottom. Although no one is going to lean on a ceiling, it might be difficult to plaster if it is flapping around when you press the trowel against it.
--
Andrew Gabriel

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snipped-for-privacy@btinternet.com wrote:

Stop worryingn, leave a 3mm gap and use decorators caulk to fill it prior to painting.
Or use the sticky tape to cover the gap before plastering.

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snipped-for-privacy@btinternet.com wrote:

Just nail/screw a bit of 2x2" to the side of the top rail and then screw the PB to that.
--
Cheers,

John.

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snipped-for-privacy@btinternet.com wrote:

Maybe next time youll screw the old plaster up before PBing, and avoid all that mess and loss of sound insulation.
NT
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I like to do things the hard way........:)
Thanks guys for all your help, made some good progress today. I have plumbing in place for my extended ensuite and cladded one side of the stud extension, this DIY lark is a doddle when you know how :)
Gonna have a few beers now and put me feet up for once
Cheers
Richard
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I always leave a 1/4" gap and fill with plasterboard adhesive. Never cracks.
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I've often wondered what exactly the term 'dry lining' means, Do you fix the plasterboard then skim over with a thin coat of plaster or just fix and fill screw holes/gaps etc?
Dave
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I suspect it originally meant lining a room without using wet trades (i.e. no plastering). I suspect nowadays, it is also used when you are intending to skim the plasterboard.
--
Andrew Gabriel

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On Sun, 05 Jun 2005 10:44:30 GMT, "David Lang"

Dry lining is when you 'glue' sheets of plasterboard to a brick\block wall and skim over it rather than the other methiod of wet plastering which is to a apply a bonding coat of some sort and then skim over that.
Dry lining is a lot cheaper, quicker and easier than the traditional wet plastering method for all trades involved.
--

SJW
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