Plasterboard walls

I've normally come across plasterboard walls that have been skimmed. The ones I'm looking at have just seen paint and/or wallpaper.
These are in a poor condition and was thinking of simply replacing the lot. Removing wallpaper is taking away the paper on the board too.
This could also present the opportunity of adding sound / thermal insulation into the studded walls. Currently there isn't any.
Any thoughts? I see even Wickes only charge £6.50 for a 8 x 4ft x 12.5mm board.
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On Monday, 18 June 2018 23:05:39 UTC+1, Fredxx wrote:

.5mm

Simple mineral wool for sound insulation won't work. The sound is transmitted through the timber battens from one side to the ot her. They have to be decoupled.
http://www.acaraconcepts.com/soundproofing/soundproofing-walls/decoupled-ti mber-stud-wall-solution/
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On 19/06/2018 08:52, harry wrote:

You could just overboard, and refit or replace the current skirting? I did this on one wall, and joined the remaining with dry lining tape and special 'skim paste', and it worked fairly well by my standards. Other services (mainly heating, but also electrics) can complicate.

Won't work *as well* as decoupled/solid-mass type options.
If there are joins/gaps (say around switches, skirting and openings) in the current arrangement that'll be plugged by wool, there will be an appreciable difference. Also ceiling and floor voids.
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On 19/06/2018 08:52, harry wrote:

Depends on what you mean by work. Mineral wool insulation *will* give a reduction in sound transmission, although it will not be a total sound block - and will not obstruct lower frequencies.
There are other things you can stuff walls with that will result in better attenuation, without going to the effort of fully decoupling the wall surface. (e.g. you can get a cork backed PIR foam insulation with a bitumen face cover on the other side. They have a bit more density and will block lower frequencies better than normal mineral wool)

If trying to reduce noise from a neighbouring property, then that might be the best way to go. For just providing better isolation between rooms that may well be overkill, especially since you will lose rooms space in the process.
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John.
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On 19/06/18 09:06, John Rumm wrote:

Dry sand is the boy.
AS massive as concrete, but has no cohesion, You dont get much sound from e.g. smacking a hammer into a pile of sand vis a cis a concrete block.
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On Wednesday, 20 June 2018 09:52:36 UTC+1, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

with

d

k.
Only trouble with sand is it leaks everywhere. Other things don't.
NT
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On 18/06/2018 23:05, Fredxx wrote:

You may even find cheaper sources if you need multiple boards, but generally PB is cheap.
Its an easy enough job to do, although don't underestimate the mess - its difficult to get off full sheets of PB without breaking them up quite a bit in the process. (easiest way I found was to cut them into sections using a wall chaser in line with each stud. Then it basically comes off in a 4x2' panel at a time).
Ideally you would want to skim the new wall if you want to avoid a repeat of the process you are currently going through.
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John.
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On Tuesday, 19 June 2018 09:00:58 UTC+1, John Rumm wrote:

e

12.5mm

unskimmed is ok as long as you don't wallpaper it.
NT
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On 19/06/2018 09:00, John Rumm wrote:

I've already filled a few bags and have a number of larger sheets to dispose of!

That was my thought too.
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Fredxx wrote:

Depending on where you live, disposing of it might cost you almost as much as buying the stuff ...
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On 20/06/2018 07:21, Andy Burns wrote:

Some of the larger house builders now attempt to entomb as much scrap PB as they can in stud walls on places they are building. Saves disposal problems, and probably helps with sound insulation a bit!
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writes

Use Rockwool rather than glass fibre for sound insulation. Better performance and much nicer to use.
--
Tim Lamb

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On 19/06/2018 09:04, Tim Lamb wrote:

Many thanks.
It's a shame it seems near double the price. But I guess about the same per kg.
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On 19/06/2018 09:04, Tim Lamb wrote:

This article: http://www.knaufexeedinsulation.ae/glasswool-or-rockwool suggests "In acoustic applications there is negligible difference between rock and glass wool in terms of optimal performance other than glass wool typically achieves the same db reduction with less than half the mass. A deciding factor can sometimes be the secondary feature of a product. For example, glass wool can also give far higher thermal performances, which may also help to retain heat in certain zones when partitioning between rooms in domestic housing. Glass wool is also often considered easier to handle due to its weight and longer, less itchy and dusty, fibers"
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On 20/06/2018 02:23, Fredxx wrote:

I recently got some glass wool style insulation from B&Q that was made from recycled material. A darker grey/brown colour that the normal yellow glass wool. A pleasant surprise what that it was far nicer to handle than the normal stuff - softer to the touch, and it did not leave that itchy "impregnated with glass fibres" feeling you normally get if you touch the stuff.
This was the one IIRC:
https://www.diy.com/departments/knauf-eko-roll-loft-insulation-l-7-28m-w-1-14-m-t-100mm/182146_BQ.prd
--
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John.
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writes

I think that article must come from the advertising dept!
I have been re-modelling a mid '90's timber frame chalet bungalow. The original insulation is glass fibre and also fitted to internal studwork. The stuff is horrible to breathe or touch! I have cut and fitted Rockwool as a replacement without any protective mask or special clothing.
I think *Earthwool* is glass fibre. Presumably so named to confuse.
--
Tim Lamb

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On Wednesday, 20 June 2018 09:46:31 UTC+1, Tim Lamb wrote:

ites

x

totally, it's the exact opposite of my experience all along.
NT
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On Monday, 18 June 2018 23:05:39 UTC+1, Fredxx wrote:

.5mm

http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php/Stud_wall_noise_reduction
NT
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On 19/06/2018 12:06, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Many thanks for the useful article.
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On 18/06/2018 23:05, Fredxx wrote:

You can get plasterboard, such as Gyproc Soundbloc, which has a high density core, to reduce noise transmission. It seems to cost about twice the price of standard 12mm, so you could simply use two layers of 12mm, with staggered joints, for about the same price. It obviously depends how much noise you want to stop, but I have used 2 x 12mm as the outer on a plasterboard wall of a fire compartment and the difference from a standard plasterboard partition was noticeable.
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Colin Bignell
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