Philips creates first LED incandescent light replacement

from http://www.rapidonline.com /
May 12, 2010
Philips seems to have made a breakthrough by creating the world΄s first LED replacement for a 60w incandescent light bulb.
The company introduced its new 12w EnduraLED bulb at the Lightfair International tradeshow and is considered to be the future of lighting.
Homeowners and businesses can expect to make substantial energy savings with the bulb cutting bills by approximately 80 per cent, while it will also last 25 times longer than its predecessor.
It is noted that use of the LED replacement could save enough electricity each year to power an additional 16.7 million homes, while also representing a milestone in the use of LED lighting technology in everyday applications.
Rudy Provoost, chief executive of Philips Lighting, said: "We challenged ourselves to answer the consumer call for an LED alternative that can mimic the traditional incandescent in light quality, shape and use.
"This milestone is even more impactful because we have been able to show people around the world that LED lighting can deliver energy efficiency and the warm white light people desire for their homes, without compromise to quality."
Cree recently posted an experimental video on YouTube highlighting the benefits that LED lighting has over traditional incandescent lamps.
Rapid Electronics is a leading UK supplier of educational products, electrical products and teaching resources to the primary, secondary and higher education sector.
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Be very interested to see if it produces a light quality even close to that of halogen. I doubt it will.
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*Growing old is inevitable, growing up is optional *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On Thu, 13 May 2010 16:52:47 +0100, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

Doesn't say halogen it says incandescent. B-)
Be interesting to see one in the flesh. I guess the CT is just a case of selecting the right phosphor(s) but I still have my doubts about light intensity and distribution. An incandescent bulb radiates fairly evenly in all directions apart from where the cap is.
All the "domestic" LED lamps I have seen so far have a very directional pattern and a horrible cold blue/white light.
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I was giving them the benefit of the doubt. ;-)

Snag is the actual junction produces a blue light which is converted by the phosphors. So efficiency goes down as you 'warm' it up.

To keep the cost down they are made up of ordinary low powered devices which are pretty directional. But higher powered types which aren't do exist. And cost a lot more.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On Thu, 13 May 2010 23:28:33 +0100, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

That last bit is the key factor, unless the light is good and the cost reasonable(*) no matter how little power they use they won't be taken up.
(*) On a PAR with mid range CFLs, not the 99p for two supermarket offerings...
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Dave Liquorice wrote:

dont think leds use phosphors.

They are very monochromatic. I would guess a warm light LED would use RGB LEDS and a frosted bulb to diffuse the light.
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On 14/05/2010 00:07, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

Wiki re white LEDs:
Phosphor-based LEDs
This method involves coating an LED of one color (mostly blue LED made of InGaN) with phosphor of different colors to produce white light, the resultant LEDs are called phosphor-based white LEDs. A fraction of the blue light undergoes the Stokes shift being transformed from shorter wavelengths to longer. Depending on the color of the original LED, phosphors of different colors can be employed. If several phosphor layers of distinct colors are applied, the emitted spectrum is broadened, effectively increasing the color rendering index (CRI) value of a given LED.
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Rod

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Rod wrote:

Ah...re-emmission.
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That's how they modify the base colour. Which with 'white' types is usually blue.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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If the original light is blue, why did it take so long for blue LEDs to come out? (You can't get away from them now.)
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Mike Tomlinson

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They've been around for years (20+ at least) but were very expensive compared to the usual red. Now there's a mass market for blue (to make white ones), you can pick up blue ones for a lot less.
MBQ
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Blue LED been around since early 80`s in silicon carbiide form, couple problems , output was tiny and maunfacturing yield was like 1 in 10,000, Siemens offered a blue SiC LED , about 80 quid each for the 5 mm in late 80s.
Big breakthrogh is down to one man in the late 90s, Shuji Nakamura who developed with aid of a lab assistant and funding of his employers, Nichia, Galium Arsenide blue LEDs with far better output and yield.
Nichia`s main buiness being CRT and lighting phosphors Mr Nakamura went on to develop the white LED.
http://archive.sciencewatch.com/jan-feb2000/sw_jan-feb2000_page3.htm
http://ledmuseum.org /
Phillips are an innovative company, compact cassette , video cassette , CD with Sony , huge medical division, been on a buying spree of other lighting companies recently. One of the big 3 lighting companies Phillips, Osram/Sylvania and GE, been the big three since electric lighting was new, didn`t get there by not keeping the hype going.
Cheers Adam
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Actually Gallium Nitride for blue LEDs. Gallium Arsenide produces Infra Red LEDs. "Ye cannae change the laws o'physics".
MBQ
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Course you can! Look up "quantum well" structures. Laser diodes work because you get to write your own version of, if not the laws of physics, then at least re-write the physical properties of materials.
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Darn looking at too many CCTV illumnators recently ;-)
Cheers Adam
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I think white LEDs do. They're actually blue LEDs with a phosphor to convert the light to white, which is why they often look blue-ish.
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On Fri, 14 May 2010 00:07:54 +0100, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

White ones do, others have been saying the light from the junctions is blue. I think in the case of white LEDs it's actually somewhere in the UV range rather than visible blue but I haven't googled... B-)

So trichromatic. Not sure that is much better than monochromatic.
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On Thu, 13 May 2010 16:52:47 +0100, "Dave Plowman (News)"

Exactly my thought. That weird sci-fi blue is just tolerable in my 28 led torch.
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On 13/05/2010 16:27, whisky-dave wrote:

.. without tripping over in the dark! Brilliant!
Are the energy companies going to subsidise these as well?
Should I get on to my broker and splash out on shares in Philips?
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Adrian C wrote:

Follow NP and get a nuclear fuel tracker
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