New style LED Light Bulb

Spotted this new style of LED light bulb in Tesco Hexham today:
http://www.philips.co.uk/c/lustre-led-light/led-4-w-25-w-e27-cap-warm- white-8718291192787/prd/
Price tag of £13 and not sure how bright (ha! dim) 250 lm is I didn't purchase but the design got me interested as most LED bulbs are very directional.
This looks like it might give a light distribution similar to an tungsten bulb. The one I examined didn't have the "crystal" defractor bit but a translucent tube with what looked like a conical reflector at the top end. Which is a bit odd as the barcode number between the one I saw and the one in the link above is the same.
Any one tried one? What is the light distribution like?
We have a couple of light fittings in a dark corridor that are essentially on 24/7. Think they currently use 2 x 9 W CFLs so cost about £23/year to run. So a couple of these would "buy" themselves in a couple of years. Assuming that 250 lm is comparable to a 9 W CFL. Trouble is a 20,000 hr life is about 2.25 years... Think I've just talked myself out of them for this application. B-)
--
Cheers
Dave.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thanks for the heads-up
For sparkling read glaring. Seems at odds with the warm and inviting claim.

Gasp, that's steep. I see they're claiming a whole 25W incandescent equivalence, so definitely not bright..

I make it 5,000 hours to break even with incandescent. Your 9W CFLs should be true 36W equivalent so these would be a bit dim. If you stocked up on 1quid (or cheaper) subsidised CFLs then I make the break even point 20,000 hours so no financial gain at all. Add to that that no Philips lamp I have ever used has reached their estimated life (especially the 24/7 ones) and it becomes a lose-lose situation.
I think you're wise to pass ;-)
--
fred
it's a ba-na-na . . . .
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That is on the basis that electricity costs won't rise. And they will.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 5 Jul 2013 07:50:47 +0100, harryagain wrote:

cost

themselves in

dim.
That's what I thought. But at least the packaging of all bulbs now has a proper unit of light on it, rather than some useless weasel words marketing speak "60 W equivalent".
I need to make up a crib sheet of the lm's for 60W perl tungsten (my personal "base line") and a few CFL's and LEDs.

Spouting bollocks about the payback. You don't know what rate I currently pay, what rate I used for the cost calculation or if I'm on a variable or fixed tarrif. As it happens there was a 4.3p/unit difference with the cost calculation having the higher value and the tarrif is fixed until May '14.
--
Cheers
Dave.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 05/07/2013 08:44, Dave Liquorice wrote:

Still gotchas.
Two lamps - one 2700 the other, say, 4300. The 4300 will need to chuck out more lumens to have the same perceived brightness as the 2700. (Albeit 2700 almost always seems yellow and gloomy to me.)
--
Rod

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 05 Jul 2013 09:04:05 +0100, polygonum wrote:

Well I don't like lamps that are 4300 K, far too cold and harsh, so lamps like that don't even get a look in. I like the warm glow of 2700 K. B-)
--
Cheers
Dave.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 05/07/2013 09:19, Dave Liquorice wrote:

Have to say, some 2700 rated LEDs are quite acceptable where none of the 2700 CFLs were. But in general I much prefer higher colour temperatures (given reasonable CRI). Think I'd actually choose somewhere around 3200 to 3700 for most environments. But in so many rooms, a lot of light is reflected from off-white surfaces, and this has quite an impact on perceived light.
--
Rod

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If you find an LED that truly gives the warm glow of tungsten, let me know.
--
*WHERE DO FOREST RANGERS GO TO "GET AWAY FROM IT ALL?"

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 05 Jul 2013 10:00:05 +0100, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

Livarno LED jobbies from Lidl (I think) aren't bad for colour temperature @ 3000 K and are normally an acceptable price. Not available in a GLS type light distribution though. I have one for when the 40W R50 tungsten spot fails in my desk lamp, it's had a "wobbly filament" for ages...
Another was in use as a trial/replacement for a R120 spot with other tungsten lamps. A pretty close match.
--
Cheers
Dave.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If you do, can you share it with us?
--
Today is Sweetmorn, the 40th day of Confusion in the YOLD 3179
RIP Douglas Carl Engelbart (January 30, 1925 – July 2, 2013)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 4 Jul 2013 23:18:40 +0100, fred wrote:

http://www.philips.co.uk/c/lustre-led-light/led-4-w-25-w-e27-cap-warm-

The one in that link would certainly be "sparkling" with that faceted defractor but the one I saw wasn't like that it was more like this:
http://www.directtradesupplies.co.uk/media/catalog/product/cache/1/ima ge/500x500/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/p/h/philips_led_golf_ball_ clear_es.jpg
http://tinyurl.com/kaac34l
Except that the tube wasn't clear like that but frosted. I think it would give a much softer light source.
--
Cheers
Dave.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Still sounds like a pig in a dress to me, value wise.
Going back to your app, they are way dimmer than your existing lamps which you could still drop to 4 or 7W CFLs if lower light was acceptable and save a few quid.
--
fred
it's a ba-na-na . . . .
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
They are still fiddling in order to get an omni directional light out of LEDs by the look of it. Interestingly I am confused by the apparently short life expectancies of leds. What are they do doing, in theory if run within their specs they should never wear out short of some internal mechanical or psu failures. Brian
--
From the Sofa of Brian Gaff Reply address is active
"fred" < snipped-for-privacy@for.mail> wrote in message news: snipped-for-privacy@y.z...
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 05/07/2013 10:08, Brian Gaff wrote:

Not sure omni directional is all that much use half a sphere will do me fine. I don't need the ceiling to be brilliantly lit. YMMV

The capacitors in the control electronics dry out and or slowly cook themselves. CFL and LED lamps in conventional enclosures tend to get too hot for the capacitors to have a long and healthy life. Also to get the best headline lumens they are run a bit close to the edge.
Purpose designed LED fixtures with proper heatsinks will last a long time but retrofit LED/CFL bulbs are always a design compromise.
The ones with the chunkiest heatsinks in fittings with nice airflow will last a good long time. Stick one inside a small glass ball diffuser with no airflow and it will die a quick horrible death.
--
Regards,
Martin Brown
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 08 Jul 2013 09:53:52 +0100, Martin Brown

Yep; the Chinese 7W (7x1W) PAR30s I bought months ago haven't failed yet and, to make sure of that, I left them on around the clock for days on end - reasoning that early failure would be weeded out that way. Their normal duty is many hours per day anyway - at least, until the start of summer. They still survive, and I reckon on buying more from the same seller on ebay - http://myworld.ebay.co.uk/yescompany200808/&_trksid=p3984.m1423.l2754 I also found, not entirely unexpectedly, that cheaping out on Chinese LEDs just isn't worthwhile - yescompany's ones seem ok, but trying to save even more money is full of pitfalls. Of three LED bulbs from fasttech, two have failed in short order. They are good at refunds and/or replacement, depending on what I want, but I'd rather not have to.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Has anyone had an LED reach its claimed life?
--
*Monday is an awful way to spend 1/7th of your life *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 04 Jul 2013 23:44:31 +0100, "Dave Plowman (News)"

Many still in operation for almost 50 years so I suppose some of them will ultamatly have a lifetime of 100 years or more if_you_don't_push_them, which is the issue of course.
--
Graham.

%Profound_observation%
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

In terms of this discussion LEDs haven't been around for 50 years.
Signal LEDs of course may have a (near) infinite life - but so do vastly under-run filament types. Things like the warning lights on a car dash.
--
*Eschew obfuscation *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

More of an issue is the controller that powers the LED. The lamp units all tend to run hot - at least 50C, and all controllers have to have large - read electrolytic - capacitors in them. No cheap electrolytic will do 20,000 hours at the kind of temperatures expected. The LEDs themselves have a known degradation rate at will last the course.
Andy
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That's what I sort of guessed. I've had two mains LED sort of explode. Given the cap ain't a user replacement, isn't it about time these extravagant claims about LED life were banned?
--
* What do they call a coffee break at the Lipton Tea Company? *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.