PAT testing class I or class II

I know a few people on here that have done PAT testing courses.
Anything wrong on this web page?
http://www.intersafe.co.uk/news/What-does-Class-I-and-Class-II-mean-when-it-comes-to-PAT-Testing/
--
Adam

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 20/07/2018 19:42, ARW wrote:

Do you mean other than the constant use of "PAT Testing" where the T Testing?
The assumption that anything with a plastic case is double insulated?
--
mailto : news admac myzen co uk

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Do people usually wire inside mains gear using bare wire then? I remember an old Decimo clock with bare wire neons, but that was a long time ago now! Brian
--
----- --
This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 20/07/18 19:42, ARW wrote:

I have, though about 10 years ago:
Metal = Class I - Bollocks
3 core cable = Class I- A strong indicator but not proof
Plug metal earth pin = Class I - Bollocks
Plastic case = Class II - No. eg Kettle.
Double box symbol = Class II - this is the only bit that is correct as far as I can see.
OK - I know who not to use for PAT now....
Ring them up and ask them what might be a Class 0 appliance :)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Code for Southampton is 023 not 02380!
--

Graham.
%Profound_observation%
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 21/07/2018 13:04, Graham. wrote:

You've now lost me!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

https://www.ringcentral.co.uk/local-numbers/southampton-2381-areacode.html
Moreover, like most places you can omit the STD code when dialling another subscriber within the same code from a fixed line. Within Southampton you can optionally omit 023, not 0238 or 02380.
--

Graham.
%Profound_observation%
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 21/07/2018 14:01, Graham. wrote:

I am, just that while it may be against convention and annoy some, any number starting 0238 is a Southampton number.
Their contact page has it in the correct notation, and I suspect the webpage is made from some template that can't cope with the less usual number format.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@mail.com says...

The 0207/0208 misconception came about because BT were running out of numbers and split the original 01 code into 071 and 081.
When the 020 code was introduced, many people thought that the 7 or 8 was part of the code because they had been used to this differentiation for several years.
However, this has now spread to the new 3000 series of exchange numbers, despite the fact that there never was an 031 London Code!
Look on Google earth at virtually any London dhopping street and you will find shops with the correct 020 code on their frontage next door to a shop with an 0208 or 0207 number!
I ordered a spare part for something a few years ago from a local supplier. I was asked for a contact number and said 8220 1234. "So that't 0208 8220 ..." came the reply!
--

Terry

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 20 Jul 2018 19:42:20 +0100, ARW

Anything right would be more appropriate. Pat testing does not fulfil a business's health and safety requirements, it no more grants immunity from prosecution than a complete failiure to PAT anything guarantees prosecution.
After that the website gets worse!
I would hope that whoever wrote the garbage has been separated from his screwdriver!
AB
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Friday, 20 July 2018 20:30:42 UTC+1, Archibald Tarquin Blenkinsopp wrote:

His *neon* screwdriver?
Owain
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 20 Jul 2018 13:35:12 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gowanhill.com wrote:

Apparently now non-approved according to my source, on the basis that a bulb failure would give a false negative. I always test mine at the start of a job and (after using the neon screwdriver) touch the live with a moving finger to be extra sure.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 21 Jul 2018 14:51:34 +0100, Scott

I would assume that was the case with any instrument, hence those proving devices that seem to be popular now.
I watched a young electrician at my previous place of employment unpack a Volage tester that had arrived from RS components and use it to test the Voltage on the three phases of the smashed socket he was to replace, the disconnection was carried out by a.n other.
As he grabbed his terminal driver, I stopped him and asked if he thought it might be a good idea to test a known live first. At this point he stuck the index finger in the handholding the terminal driver out and wiped it across the most exposed phase.
I am not sure if this is an accepted means of checking phase Voltages, but the technique would have been my ticket off many construction and manufacturing sites.
AB
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 21 Jul 2018 17:30:28 +0100, Archibald Tarquin Blenkinsopp

It would certainly not determine the voltage, but I suggest it must be safer to find out under controlled conditions that a wire is live rather than finding out later. I emphasise I would test with the neon screwdriver first so the 'wipe' would be belt and braces. This is at home where I decide the H&S rules!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Come on now, apprentices are a perfectly valid sacrificial piece of test equipment.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, 23 July 2018 08:20:48 UTC+1, Cynic wrote:

I'd say the same about students ;-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, 23 July 2018 15:29:02 UTC+1, whisky-dave wrote:

Some of those piercings must be a bit dangerous in a high voltage laboratory.
Owain
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, 23 July 2018 17:25:13 UTC+1, snipped-for-privacy@gowanhill.com wrote:

We don't allow our students to go above 50V in my lab, personally I wouldn't trust most of them about 5V. Don;t forget the dangers of Neodymium magnets, put those in your pocket with some genital piercings for a laugh :-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 24/07/2018 09:56, whisky-dave wrote:

50V? God. Back in my schooldays, 11 year olds were experimenting with CRTs, with 3500V or more on two banana plugs PLUGGED BACKWARDS onto the protruding pins - ie: with the live pins sticking out each side.
Right next to them, the next child was doing an experiment with water!
SteveW
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.