Paint matching questions

There is minor damage to the wall of our close (common stairway for readers in England). I'm just wondering how to carry out a temporary repair. The Factors (managing agents) claim that matching the paint is
too difficult.
1. Is the Dulux colour matching app reliable? I took an ordinary photograph and it looks nothing like the colour of the wall, so I have my doubts.
2. It is a very small indentation (about the size of a pound coin) so I wondered if I could use car touch-up paint. This would give me a large choice of colours at low cost compared to having a whole tin mixed up at B&Q.
3. Is basic Polyfilla okay for a minor repair to plaster?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, 27 July 2020 10:30:19 UTC+1, Scott wrote:

Some years ago, I got Johnstone's to match a Dulux colour. I continued painting the same wall where I had run out of Dulux - and there was no perceptible difference. (I got a discount on Johnstones's so it made sense at the time.)
You simply cannot expect a photograph to work. Far too much variation unless there is good colour management in use.
Can you take a physical sample? Most decent paint mixers have photospectrometers.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 27 Jul 2020 02:53:57 -0700 (PDT), polygonum_on_google

Thanks, but I was looking for practical advice about the paint matching app: https://www.duluxdecoratorcentre.co.uk/download-our-app
I would not consider using a photo for the reasons stated. .

The problem is that I could then be accused of making the damage worse. This is a mutual area and relations with neighbours are less harmonious than they once were.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The link to the Android app is broken. If I search for the app ID on Google Play it doesn't show up, although other AkzoNobel/Dulux apps do. It might be a hint that one of them is an app for using a Bluetooth colorimeter - I don't think they would bother if a phone camera was good enough.
(The iOS app link tells me to download iTunes, which is no good on Linux)

You can get tester cards from paint vendors - as others have said trying RAL/BS colours can help. Although if they've painted it in pound shop Magnolia you might discover that every magnolia is a different shade...
Theo
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 27/07/2020 11:04, Scott wrote:

I was a colour matcher, for 1 year only, in the early 70's. We would only work with actual examples. If it was a car part we would expect it to be from as near as the site of repair as possible because of colour variance due to a bias exposure to strong light on any one area over years.
Neither could it be said exactly how a mix, with what may be a different base of resins, etc, would look after time due to 'life' of the resins. Close to colour and feathered blending is best you can do.
But, there is more than one answer. I have seen examples of a same colour mix but, the area was painted as a simple design or pattern that reflected the light differently so that an image was seen at different angles or light levels. Hidden art.
The other example was a curry stain on a wool carpet. The woman, whose roof I was doing at the time, was in despair. I took a picture, came home to Photoshop and designed a 5 colour image of an owl, (She had owls as figurines about the place).
I took her a printed A4 and she said OK, give it a go. It turned out well. Better than a little rug over it.
...Ray.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 27/07/2020 10:30, Scott wrote:

Wikes do paint tester pots. If necessary mix it your self
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 27/07/2020 10:30, Scott wrote:

It can be but you might do well enough for a tiny patch with a small sampler shade card and pick the two closest and a neutral white. Then mix a small amount of the exact colour - bear in mind that it usually dries to a different shade to when it is wet.

Car touch up paint is intended for painting metal and usually a base coat pigment clear gloss finish. It will stick out like a sore thumb!
The emulsion samplers are a much easier way to do it. Dulux and various own brand versions are available. But you may be in trouble if the surface finish is anything other than matt.
The eye spots straight lines so stipple any repair paint on.

Yes. A touch of the right colour paint in it can help too.
--
Regards,
Martin Brown
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 27 Jul 2020 11:28:49 +0100, Martin Brown

Actually the wall is shiny gloss.

I may be in trouble then :-)

Thanks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, 27 July 2020 10:30:19 UTC+1, Scott wrote:

It's very unlikely that a close painter used a custom or fancy colour; look at British Standard BS381C, BS2660, BS5252 and BS4800.
https://www.britishstandardcolour.com/
https://www.e-paint.co.uk/BS_4800_Colour_chart.asp

If it's a glossy finish, yes; I have done that in the past and it was imperceptable. It helps that older car colours were probably also BS colours, before the car companies got custom paints made.

Polyfiller might be too soft compared to a hard wall plaster.
Owain
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 27 Jul 2020 04:01:12 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gowanhill.com wrote:

This is certainly good advice. Could I get a colour chart from the Dulux shop as I would not trust my mobile phone to reproduce the colour precisely? There may be a difficulty in that my neighbour (sadly now deceased) told them the paint was the wrong colour and made them do it again. Anything could have happened at that stage.

It is very glossy, probably oil-based gloss.

What about car filler (which comes with the touch-up paints anyway) if I am attempting to use car paint?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 27 Jul 2020 12:57:29 +0100, Scott wrote:

Should be able to and a phone hasn't a hope in hell of colour matching.

coin) so

I very much doubt any car colour will match a decoration colour.

Bit odd to use an oil based gloss on walls. But if it's that glossy I think it must be (or a water based high gloss paint). I've never come across a high gloss emulsion.
When picking up the colour charts pick up the one covering gloss paints...

Probably not an issue unless the dinge is there due to the repeated impact of say a door handle. In which case a door stop is required meaning the dinge can be filled with polyfilla. Provide a decent key for the filler, scratch out/remove the paint from the hollow.
--
Cheers
Dave.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, 27 July 2020 13:22:32 UTC+1, Dave Liquorice wrote:

Normal in Scottish closes which are intended to be washed down - weekly, when the auld wifey put the little card saying "it is your turn to clean the close" through your letter box.
Either gloss on the lower half, or 'wally'.
https://were.co.uk/wally-close-tiling/
Owain
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 27 Jul 2020 05:33:43 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gowanhill.com wrote:

Ah, that and "Glasgow Corporation Green" brings back memories of green gloss walls in old (victorian vintage) hospitals.
Tried asking Glasgow council what their green was(is)? If some one complained the orginal colour was "wrong" then perhaps it was redone in Glasgow Corporation Green.
--
Cheers
Dave.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, 27 July 2020 13:58:44 UTC+1, Dave Liquorice wrote:

If it was the same as the buses, Glasgow Green or Glasgow Apple Green, FM 171 or 174
https://www.dorsetmodelbuses.co.uk/page3.html#SCOTTISH
modelling suppliers are another source of small quantities of paint in strange colours.
Do we know if it's Glasgow, or green? It might be Midlothian Maroon? :-)
Owain
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 27 Jul 2020 08:46:19 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gowanhill.com wrote:

I did say 'Glasgow Corporation green' so you can take that as a yes.
The problem is I think it's darker than the colour that was used on the buses. I think it was 'inspired by' rather than an exact colour match.
I went to the Dulux shop. They can match any colour - preferably with a sample to work from - but the minimum quantity is 1 litre (which is why I was interested in the possibility of using car touch-up paint).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 27 Jul 2020 05:33:43 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gowanhill.com wrote:

Its wally up to the first floor then painted thereafter.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 27 Jul 2020 13:22:28 +0100 (BST), "Dave Liquorice"

I just phoned them and she sounds very helpful. She says it's 'cool'.

It was done more than 10 years ago in an attempt to retain the traditional appearance. I think the aim was 'Glasgow Corporation green' but it looks darker than that to me.

Will do.

It's not. I believe the impact occurred when roofers lowered a bucket of debris from the loft but I cannot prove that allegation.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I wouldn't trust any colour chart, whether on a phone or a printed colour chart.
We bought some "terracotta" paint which looked that colour on the chart and in the see-through plastic "tin" but was more of a pink when applied to the wall.
We bought some "emerald white" (*) paint which looked very pale green on my phone and on the colour chart, but is very pale blue on the wall. That paint was bought in a hurry to replace some green paint that the builders applied but which was a far more saturated and vivid colour than the colour chart suggested.
(*) Emeralds are a *green* gemstone.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, 27 July 2020 13:35:26 UTC+1, NY wrote:

The other day we were looking round some paints. One particular colour - two pots. Both with areas purporting to be the colour. They were more different to each other than to completely different colours.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

There are printed colour charts, which are just an approximation like a screen is, and painted colour charts that are the paint applied to the surface just like you would. The latter are more accurate.
Theo
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.