OT: Wood burning stove question

I inherited a WB stove with this house, but no instructions. I lit it today for the first time and realise that I don't know how to set the controls, and without knowing the make/model I can't search for instructions. I presume they're all the same to those in the know but I'm a WB newbie. It's a small (4kW?) stove. There are 3 controls: a rotating air valve at the bottom of the door, a pushrod control beneath the ash tray and a second at the left, at approx the same level. The first pushrod seems to let air in from underneath but I don't know what the other does.
How do I set them?
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I trawled through pictures of WB stoves on Google until I found mine, then downloaded a manual ...
The controls usually adjust amount of air admitted at the front ("air wash") and back. There's sometimes a lever to riddle the ashes without opening the doors.
And if you live in London, don't bother. You won't be allowed to use it shortly.
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On 30/09/17 14:32, Huge wrote:

That 'announcement' made me chuckle. It wasn't so long ago the tree huggers were preaching we should be using wood burners to reduce CO2 emissions. THEIR theory being that, while burning wood produces CO2, it isn't CO2 that has been 'locked away' for millions of years (as in the case of coal, oil, gas, etc. or energy derived from them).
I also remember, in the 1970s, when the tree huggers where trying to kill off nuclear power, they were arguing we had enough fossil fuel (especially coal) to last 300 years. Having convinced the government to stop investing in nuclear power, they invented man made global warming.
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In fact even burning wood-chip or logs increases atmospheric CO2 in the short term. It takes say 50 - 100 years for a tree to grow, slowly extracting CO2 from the atmosphere as it does so, but only a moment or two to burn wood-chip, a bit longer for logs, so the atmospheric CO2 rises in the short term. If we want to reduce our emissions of CO2, burning wood-chip or logs is not the way to go.
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wrote:

Lot better than with coal and natural gas tho. And some eucs grow a hell of a lot faster than that. One of mine which is only 45 years old has an immense trunk that is now 5' across at the base, not circumference and we mostly burn eucs in our WB stoves.

Still much better than coal and natural gas. Only nukes are better again.
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On 30/09/2017 15:31, Chris Hogg wrote:

That was why I emphasised THEIR theory, I don't have much time for tree huggers.
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On 30/09/2017 14:54, Brian Reay wrote:

When I joined the CEGB in 1967 or 1970 (depending on your definition) the received wisdom was that we had coal for 300 years, but that oil would run out by the end of the 1980's.
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We did. We decided to stop mining it for a number of reasons. It is now lost - mostly you can't recover a flooded/collapsed deep mine.

There was a naivety that we had found all the oil. We hadn't. However, what's remaining isn't the cheapest to recover, and current oil prices make many of the active fields today not viable because there's a surplus of supply over demand.
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Me too.
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Would this " ban" include barbeques heated by wood or charcoal?
Many a warm evening in urban areas is ruined by people who think that burning food under an open sky makes it taste good, but a lot of barbeque sauces are sold that disguise the taste of the burnt offerings.
G.Harman
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On 30/09/2017 14:54, Brian Reay wrote:

"Tree huggers" makes me think of the 1993 film set in New Zealand called "The Piano" where the Maori kids "hugged" (i.e. shagged) the trees and the white girl got told off for doing the same.
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On 30/09/2017 14:32, Huge wrote:

I tried that for a short time but didn't spot it and other jobs took me away. Perhaps I need to persevere :-(

I wouldn't dream of living in London. Being there for a year in my early 20s was fun, and so are short visits, but I can't think of many things worse than living there (unless you can afford the "nice" bits) now.
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On Sat, 30 Sep 2017 14:56:53 +0100 snipped-for-privacy@nomail.com wrote:

I keep hearing from residents that 'the nice bits' are getting smaller and smaller, and/or are being over-run by people from other countries.
And London seems to be swelling, places that I knew growing up as being in Essex are now referred to as being in London. Woodford, Romford, for example.
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I was surprised when I saw this announcement because I though that any city that was designated a smokeless zone prohibited wood as well as coal from being burned. Evidently not, and wood (but not coal) has been permitted. I'm lucky that out in the country we can burn coal and wood and probably will always be able to.
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The exemption is not for wood (which is banned), it's for a specific list of exempt appliances which can be used to burn banned fuels in clean air zones. The list of exempt appliances is here: https://smokecontrol.defra.gov.uk/appliances.php
They were supposed to meet specific polution figures, but that's just based on what the manufacturers claim. Turns out they all chuck out loads more than the manufacturers claimed, so removing most, if not all, from the exemption list should be easy to do. About 6 months ago, GLA said they would ask DEFRA to update the list in October when they had measured actual polution output from the appliances. This would be all clean air zones in England not just London.
It may be that GLA are now also looking at London-specfic legislation. I saw a suggestion of a ban on new installations (which GLA can do), with the exemption list being updated later (which DEFRA has to do) which would ban the use of most/all existing installations. Clean air zone legislation is all restrospective, or it wouldn't work.
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On Sun, 1 Oct 2017 09:16:19 -0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@cucumber.demon.co.uk (Andrew Gabriel) wrote:

And the manufacturers will be burning the correct fuel.
Despite being in clean air zones look at some of those filling stations that sell (expensive) bags of solid fuel on the forecourt. Many still have bags of plain old coal and that being cheaper means people who are hard up buy it. or they burn old pallets or skip find wood with layers of old paint and treatments over it.
G.Harman
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On 30/09/17 14:29, snipped-for-privacy@nomail.com wrote:

If you have a wood burner you should have the chimney swept- at least once a year. A good 'sweep' will almost certainly recognise the stove - at least the make- or be able to show you the drill.
Seriously, don't neglect the chimney- wood burners deposit all kinds of 'muck' in the chimney and it is just waiting to burn.
You can do it yourself but getting it done once by a proper sweep would be a good idea- firstly you would have a clean chimney you can just give a run through yourself, and solve your other problem.
I'm not a sweep looking for work BTW but I researched wood burners- we were keen to have one. In fact we are still half considering it.
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On Sat, 30 Sep 2017 14:43:14 +0100

Very sound advice. It may also be relevant for your home insurance. And if your house happens to be thatched, be very careful of woodburners, they emit air at far higher temperatures than other stoves.
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We have 2. Very pleased with them. Took me a while to get used to operating them in an optimal manner, especially stopping the sitting room from being a sauna.

Agreed.

Be careful of fires, full stop. When we were looking for a house 2 years ago, Rule #3 was "No thatch". (and to preclude the inevitable questions, Rule #1 was "No neighbours" & Rule #2 "Nothing listed.")
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On 30/09/2017 14:55, Davey wrote:

If you're thatched you will have consulted your insurance company.
Assuming you want your insurance to be valid... We have a metre long chimney pot to keep them happy. And spark filters seem to be out of fashion.
Andy
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